How to install WinXP to sata drive without floppy

vbimport

#1

Newer PCs have no floppy drive or floppy controller. How can WinXP be installed to sata drives since Windows prompts for floppy with drivers when F6 is pressed to install sata drivers during install?


#2

You can either use a cd or usb stick


#3

I think USB stick won’t work with XP, however it’s possible to integrate SATA drivers (have to be the F6 drivers) into XP using nLite.


#4

Liggy

Newer PC’s or capable to load from USB sticks per the bios, so I thought It could be used /done that way?


#5

I remember what it was now: It was a Dell and they had a F6 Driver utility to set up a usb stick.


#6

I was a repair tech for a compant that had a fleet of Dell GX280’s

Windows XP from the factory, Dell XP reinstall disc the only thing that was necessary most times was to make sure you made a fresh pot of coffee
before you started.

so the whole XP doesn’t recognize SATA drives is quite simply hogwash

They HAD to recognize SATA drives because there was NO IDE connector on the MotherBoard.

I also dealt with a bunch of Dell 1520 notebooks these also used SATA HDD’s

Never had a problem doing an installation on them.

BTW if you don’t have a Dell reinstallation disc get one, the best one to use is the Teal colored XP PRo SP3 disc.

These can typically be found on ebay for ~$15

Installing XP with a genuine Dell disc you will NEVER need to “Activate” your installation, without a genuine dell disc you are on your own…

SOMETIMES a particular boar was a bit twitchy about recognizing an UNFORMATTED drive, but generally I’d format them as a separate operation before I ever got near a system for a fresh installation of XP.


#7

Exactly what setup do you have, bevills1? You may be able to get by with the generic Microsoft IDE drivers.

Or, with an esoteric setup, you may have to make a custom installation disc (using another computer, if necessary). Or get a USB floppy drive. Or use some other pre-specified method of instructing the XP installer to use the proper drivers.


#8

I’ve done this before using rufus which is free and n-lite which is also free.

You can google the rufus tutorials and use n-lite to integrate any post sata drivers you need or anything else for that matter to the image

Works on most systems, mostly newer, your chances of it working probably diminish with older systems


#9

If your BIOS has the SATA ports configured to operate in IDE mode, then it will install without any issue. If they are configured in AHCI mode, then WinXP will require a driver for the SATA controller to recognize the drives.
Dell installation CDs have all their required drivers integrated, that’s why it’s not an issue in that case. You can use nLite to make your own customized install CD with appropriate drivers integrated, although getting that to work properly can involve some frustrating trial and error. I’ve never tried rufus, so maybe that’s easier.

One way to try sidestepping this is to install in IDE mode, then install SATA drivers, then finally change your BIOS to start using AHCI. I vaguely recall there’s issues that can cause this procedure to fail though. I can’t remember what the trick is, but unless I’m thinking of something else, then I think it’s not as straightforward as what I just said.


#10

BD, you can do a Google Search on the phrase “slipstream SATA into WinXP” and this will provide many discussions about how to ‘unzip’ the raw WinXP CD to your hard drive, how you can insert each motherboard’s specific SATA drivers and then - if you choose - you can edit the start-up script to look there and load those drivers. Otherwise, it will look in that Folder and offer those, whereby I can then press ENTER to accept.

You’ll need to burn a Bootable CD, which takes a Boot File AND some specifications for Boot Sector & Size. There’s a mention of N-LITE above, too.


#11

[QUOTE=shamino;2707727]
One way to try sidestepping this is to install in IDE mode, then install SATA drivers, then finally change your BIOS to start using AHCI. I vaguely recall there’s issues that can cause this procedure to fail though. I can’t remember what the trick is, but unless I’m thinking of something else, then I think it’s not as straightforward as what I just said.[/QUOTE]

There are registry keys you must change, or you must use a tool provided by Microsoft (the location of the tool/patch fails me now) to prepare the system to switch to the new drivers. You are essentially causing a change in detected hardware and the OS will not otherwise have the matching drivers for the “new” hardware, nor will it expect the change.


#12

The easiest thing is to use nLite and insert the AHCI-drivers in the XP-CD

To install XP from USB-Stick is also possible, you can make a bootable Stick with YUMI.

If you have a Board with AMD-chipset you can switch some SATA-connectors to IDE, connect a HDD and install at least the AHCI-drivers. After that you can switch all SATA to AHCI


#13

[QUOTE=shamino;2707727]If your BIOS has the SATA ports configured to operate in IDE mode, then it will install without any issue. If they are configured in AHCI mode, then WinXP will require a driver for the SATA controller to recognize the drives.
Dell installation CDs have all their required drivers integrated, that’s why it’s not an issue in that case. You can use nLite to make your own customized install CD with appropriate drivers integrated, although getting that to work properly can involve some frustrating trial and error. I’ve never tried rufus, so maybe that’s easier.

One way to try sidestepping this is to install in IDE mode, then install SATA drivers, then finally change your BIOS to start using AHCI. I vaguely recall there’s issues that can cause this procedure to fail though. I can’t remember what the trick is, but unless I’m thinking of something else, then I think it’s not as straightforward as what I just said.[/QUOTE]

Switching from IDE mode to AHCI mode after installation will often result in a no-boot situation… at least with Vista or 7… Not sure what happens in XP.

To fix this issue will require either an appropriate SATA driver, AFTER the switch,

an appropriate Microsoft fixit
(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976)

Or a clean installation

another “work around” is to install the OS onto an IDE drive then clone the OS to a SATA drive after the fact.