How to fit a 3hr30min wav file onto 1 CD?

vbimport

#1

I am trying to burn a huge file to a CD (.wav file). It is 530mb and 3hr 30mins. I haven’t tried to burn a CD in some time, and obviously this attempt was rejected by WMP, as the CD-R only holds 82 minutes of audio. Any way to get this file onto a CD? If not one, can it be broken down somehow and burned on multiple CDs?
Thanks for answering a newbie q.
-Zach


#2

Hey Zach, you can either burn the entire file on the disc as a wav file (it will only play in wav supported players, basically the computer) or split it up into 80 minute chunks using a wav splitter or wav cutter. You can find these programs free for use or trial by searching for them in either google or download.com. I would split the file into 4 - 55 minute chunks. Good luck with your project.


#3

You could re-encode the .wav to a much lower bitrate (about 1/3 of what it is now) and get it all on one CD.
Virtualdub, Audio, full processing, Compression, mp3, choose a bitrate, then File, save wav.
Depending on it’s current bitrate, select one that’s about 1/3 the size.


#4

You could re-encode the .wav to a much lower bitrate (about 1/3 of what it is now) and get it all on one CD.
Virtualdub, Audio, full processing, Compression, mp3, choose a bitrate, then File, save wav.
Depending on it’s current bitrate, select one that’s about 1/3 the size

What does a lower bitrate do? The quality drops, I take it? And for the sequence you gave (virtualdub, audio, etc)…what program? WMP? Or is the program called virtualdub? Once again, forgive my ignorance.
BTW, the current file is at a bitrate of 44100Hz, 4bits, stereo. Another profile of the file says “WAV 354 kb/s 44.1kHz 4bit stereo”.
-Zach


#5

I always thought that if you burn it as an Audio CD, the bitrate, filesize or any of those things doesn’t matter, it is only the length (playing time) of the music that matters. Only way to fit that music on an audio cd would be to speed things up, so that 3.5 hrs of music is played in about 80 minutes…that will be quite a funny thing, but not something you desire I think.

But I could be wrong about the above…I am no expert

However, if you want to burn it as data, this should be no problem. As Aliens50 pointed out, you could split the file into smaller chunks.


#6

Bitrate is directly related to filesize. Various compression schemes also have a huge effect on filesize.
A raw wav (for example) that is uncompressed PCM, is 500,000kb. (about 1.5 hours ripped from an avi).
In virtualdub (the program), I ripped the same avi, and used Microsoft ADPCM compression at 44,100hz, 4bit stereo, and the resulting .wav is 126,300kb.
I ripped the same avi again, and used MPEG Layer 3, 24,000hz, 80 kbit, and it’s only 52,000kb.
You do the math, and figure out what fits on a CDR.
Find out it’s current bitrate and frequency. Most .wav files are between 128kbit and 256kbit @ between 24000hz and 48000hz.
You can drop the bitrate to probably 64kbit, and freq to 24000hz, and I doubt your ears can tell the difference.
It’s still going to take some serious compression to fit that whole wav onto one CDR, but it can be done, and virtualdub is the ideal tool to do it. There are others, such as Audacity, Goldwave, Soundforge etc, but vdub is easy.

Given your file is bitrate of 44100Hz, 4bits, stereo, uncompressed PCM, open it in virtualdub. Select Audio, WAV audio. Then Audio again, Full Processing. Then Audio again, Compression. Choose mpeg Layer-3. On the right you’ll see a list of frequencies and bitrates. Keep it at 4bit stereo, 44100hz.
If that setting is not available, select the next highest, such as 8bit, 44100hz, anything, as long as it’s stereo.
This way, we’re not dropping the bitrate, but we are using mp3 compression.
Select File, save .wav and save it somewhere.
Compare it to the size of your original, and it just might fit on a CDR.


#7

:confused: What on earth!

The file will already fit a DATA CD, so it’s bitrate and/or compression format are already low enough for that.

If the time is 3 1/2 hours ( 210 minutes ), then the only way to make compliant audio CDs out of that, is to split it into 3, - 80, 80, 50, or even them up if you like.

The “quick and dirty” way in Nero, would be to make a track, and then adjust the start/end (and add additional track marks if you like), and then repeat for al 3 parts - overlapping them if you want.

The only other option, is to recompress to MP3 for an MP3/CD player and that still leaves enough space for a 320k bitrate.

You CANNOT alter an audio CD, since the specification dictates a 44.1k sample rate and 16 bit uncompressed stereo audio.


#8

Matth is right. It would have to be a nonstandard CD, which may not play even.