How Do You Store the Videos?

vbimport

#1

We all know we can store the videos on our memory card, external hard driver, DVD disc, blu-ray disc or even cloud storage, but which one is your favorite? And do you know the history of those video storage? Check here for the details if you got any interest.


#2

You still can’t beat optical discs, and there is [I]nothing[/I] on the horizon to replace them. :frowning:

I don’t consider hard drives suitable for long-term storage. Even if you don’t suffer a catastrophic failure (and there seems no other kind with HDDs), they need too much management and checking. The cloud merely delegates the responsibility to someone else, who is probably over worked, under-paid and places no value on your data (unless it’s the sort that can be stolen & sold ;)).

A hard drive may still work, but how do you know the data hasn’t been modified? Your new (badly written) professional photo management software could have overwritten a few thousand photos with thumbails when it catalogued a hard drive, then your backup routine meticulously replicated the error to all of your backup hard drives. I know that this has happened to at least one professional photographer - who continued to proclaim HDDs as the only safe storage medium for the rest of the three page article. :rolleyes:

For long-term storage it has to be write-once (or difficult to re-write) media. Not only for data security, but it also encourages good working practices - such as bringing a project to a timely conclusion which can be archived, rather than letting it drag on until you’ve forgotten what you were doing.

Also the read/write mechinism should be separate from the storage medium. This not only reduces the cost of making multiple copies, but disconnects the two points of failure.

In 15 years of trying, I have yet to lose any data from optical discs.

But then again, if you only want to store downloaded videos of cats doing funny things…


#3

I agree with Ibex, but for my Bluray movies I store them in .mp4 format on a very large external hard drive.


#4

I would say, storage today.

  1. Harddrive (preferably offline storage with docking station and software to index so you can find what you are looking for).
  2. Ultrium tape storage
  3. Blurays and DVDs and CDs

Hard drives are fast, all data there at once, overwrite, delete. Easy to use in docking stations, large space on hard drives. Cheap and portable. Perfect for off line storage.

Ultrium tape storage, not that much space, not that expensive for the tapes, but a big investment for hardware. Long archival life if you do not need access to it and so on. Last is optical, not that much space, where CDs are the best for archiving stuff, hardware is cheap. Probably long archival life. But you can not erase and not cheap. Remember all of the information in my post is with the thought about, price per gigabyte or in relation to that with some other factors.

Conclusion:

Optical is best because of price, hardware, archival life and all that. But it is only good for storage of smaller amounts of data. The use of optical should be for stuff you absolutely want to save, personal pictures, movie clips and other important data. You can supplement with USB storage to for temporary storage that you will move over to optical once you are done with editing and all that.

Harddrives are best for mass storage, mostly of stuff you want to save (like me a hoarder of data) but with the option to erase of just to store for as long as I like. If the hard drive breaks down or something happens to it. Bah, not the end of the world. The space hard drives save for me, plus how practical they are, the win out over any other media.

Otherwise buying movies on bluray, dvds, plus music is safe for archival reasons as they will not go bad, you do not burn these movies but it is a pressed disc. As shown here on the forums, people have done error scans of these old discs and they are still good and sound.

The key in my post is simply, store lots of data on hard drives, and buy stuff you really want (blurays dvds) and save important data on gold CDs or something like that.


#5

[QUOTE=alan1476;2724960]I agree with Ibex, but for my Bluray movies I store them in .mp4 format on a very large external hard drive.[/QUOTE]

For storing copies of DVDs etc. you can’t beat the convenience of a HDD. Reliability if of minimal importance as you still have the original disc, so the only loss is your time re-copying.

You make a good point about the data format, for long-term storage it’s a very important consideration. It is a near certainty that MP4 videos will be playable long after encrypted, proprietry data formats like Blu-Ray.

Apologies to Christine for going a bit off-topic. :flower:


#6

A hard drive for me, so and if there is something very important also back it up on DVD and BD.
In any case i should have one working copy when i need it.


#7

Hard drives still have the demonstrably longest shelf life of any known storage media.

Particularly “External” drives that are “powered down” when not in actual
use (read/write activity)

Anything you are really worried about should simply be stored twice
on separate drives (or “multiples of” depending on importance)

Disregarding manufacturer’s claims I have yet to see an optical disc >5 years old remain fully readable.

SSD’s are still too expensive for archival storage, even compared to storing the data in a double redundant hard drive (storing the date THREE times on three drives)

Prices are coming down, but they are not there yet.

And long term readability as unpowered storage devices is not yet proven.

I know I have a fireproof file cabinet with a drawer full of old hard drives
that are still perfectly readable >20years after writing to them


#8

AllanDeGroot, agree.

Because of a hoarding problem, I did have over 1000 burned DVDs. Copied all of them back to hard drive storage, and eight of them had errors, I could read back most files, as I had multiple files on all the dvds but a few where lost. And I never had bad media, verbatim and other good brands. Plus always used a pioneer burner and burned at optimal speed (not to fast, not to slow).

The funny thing is that I trust CD’s the most, why, because they have been around for a long time and seem to be of high quality, plus less risk of damage, and high tolerance for errors. The drawback is less space, but high quality media.

Reason for this is I did have about 100 CD-R and that was kodak, teac and other media that was burned on a 2x plasmon scsi burner, WAY back during the 90s and none of them had any problems reading back the data. Some where gold discs and others grenish.

So for optical, I trust gold CDs the most. And now with USB2 or USB3 memorysticks like 32gb 64gb or 128gb you could use them as well to stor data, as most important data is not to big. Multiple storage places reduced the possibility of the data being lost forever.

And I believe, off line hard drive storage using a docking station is the optimal solution when comparing price and storage space. And as a bonus you can access all data at once.


#9

[QUOTE=Ibex;2724947]You still can’t beat optical discs, and there is [I]nothing[/I] on the horizon to replace them. :frowning:

I don’t consider hard drives suitable for long-term storage. Even if you don’t suffer a catastrophic failure (and there seems no other kind with HDDs), they need too much management and checking. The cloud merely delegates the responsibility to someone else, who is probably over worked, under-paid and places no value on your data (unless it’s the sort that can be stolen & sold ;)).

A hard drive may still work, but how do you know the data hasn’t been modified? Your new (badly written) professional photo management software could have overwritten a few thousand photos with thumbails when it catalogued a hard drive, then your backup routine meticulously replicated the error to all of your backup hard drives. I know that this has happened to at least one professional photographer - who continued to proclaim HDDs as the only safe storage medium for the rest of the three page article. :rolleyes:

For long-term storage it has to be write-once (or difficult to re-write) media. Not only for data security, but it also encourages good working practices - such as bringing a project to a timely conclusion which can be archived, rather than letting it drag on until you’ve forgotten what you were doing.

Also the read/write mechinism should be separate from the storage medium. This not only reduces the cost of making multiple copies, but disconnects the two points of failure.

In 15 years of trying, I have yet to lose any data from optical discs.

But then again, if you only want to store downloaded videos of cats doing funny things…[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the comments, and your title already told us what is your favorite, haha


#10

[QUOTE=Dennis_Olof;2724961]I would say, storage today.

  1. Harddrive (preferably offline storage with docking station and software to index so you can find what you are looking for).
  2. Ultrium tape storage
  3. Blurays and DVDs and CDs

Hard drives are fast, all data there at once, overwrite, delete. Easy to use in docking stations, large space on hard drives. Cheap and portable. Perfect for off line storage.

Ultrium tape storage, not that much space, not that expensive for the tapes, but a big investment for hardware. Long archival life if you do not need access to it and so on. Last is optical, not that much space, where CDs are the best for archiving stuff, hardware is cheap. Probably long archival life. But you can not erase and not cheap. Remember all of the information in my post is with the thought about, price per gigabyte or in relation to that with some other factors.

Conclusion:

Optical is best because of price, hardware, archival life and all that. But it is only good for storage of smaller amounts of data. The use of optical should be for stuff you absolutely want to save, personal pictures, movie clips and other important data. You can supplement with USB storage to for temporary storage that you will move over to optical once you are done with editing and all that.

Harddrives are best for mass storage, mostly of stuff you want to save (like me a hoarder of data) but with the option to erase of just to store for as long as I like. If the hard drive breaks down or something happens to it. Bah, not the end of the world. The space hard drives save for me, plus how practical they are, the win out over any other media.

Otherwise buying movies on bluray, dvds, plus music is safe for archival reasons as they will not go bad, you do not burn these movies but it is a pressed disc. As shown here on the forums, people have done error scans of these old discs and they are still good and sound.

The key in my post is simply, store lots of data on hard drives, and buy stuff you really want (blurays dvds) and save important data on gold CDs or something like that.[/QUOTE]

Agree with you, Dennis. We always need to think about the cost and what we need to store before choose the storage types :slight_smile:


#11

Thanks you guys for sharing.

According to the polls for now, the Hard Drive is still the most used storage type for most of the people. It is cost effective, easy to use, large volume and could be erased easily.
Besides the hard driver and DVD discs, I also use the cloud storage such as Dropbox to sync some working files on different devices, it is much more convenient compared with others.


#12

[QUOTE=vroom;2724973]A hard drive for me, so and if there is something very important also back it up on DVD and BD.
In any case i should have one working copy when i need it.[/QUOTE]

Same approach here…:iagree:


#13

TBH I use a combination of methods.

Most of the movies I watch nowadays are recorded on my Sky+ HD box. I watch them and then delete them.

I have a large collection of DVDs which doesn’t get added to these days and any movies I really want to keep I buy on Blu-ray.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#14

Wombler, exactly.

I did this like 10 years ago, started cleaning out and sorting the stuff I have. I am almost done, but it is so nice to be free at last. My mistake was not understanding, in time, that having a nice and tidy storage, and index finding program was the problem.

Yes, I am a hoarder but the nice thing with having everything sorter, (and I keep sorting stuff right away if I want to save it), it is so much easier to just dump thing, or just ignoring it or forgetting about it.

Only stuff I need to save, like photos and other stuff, I burn onto gold CDs, but I do keep them on hard drive to. Plus store a DVD copy to because dvds are good enough quality and proven media. Plus price is not to bad. The worst optical media is bluray, for sure, they fail even faster then DVD and there are lots of problems, my conclusion from all the stuff I have seen in the forums, here on myce.

Remember I am talking about optical media you burn, not the cd’s dvd’s bluray’s you buy in the store, they are fine and even better than burned media, but you can not store your own data on them. The process of producing these media are different compared to media you burn.

I was hoping HD-DVD was going to win the format war, but it did not. Those discs would have been way better for burning, than what blu-ray is even though the storage space is smaller. Sure, bluray is a future technology and good for movies, 4k and so on.

But as for burning your own discs, not so much and with future formats I am unsure there will be consumer products for such things. As the sales of burned media have fallen so much. That being said, as I do not backup most of my stuff any more to optical media, because hard drives are so convenient, my need for optical media is more or less gone.


#15

Excellent thread Christine. Interesting results.:flower:


#16

Currently, I mostly use DVD+/-Rs, so that’s how I voted. I don’t have any dual layer, as I’ve never really needed them and they tend to be expensive. Regardless of price, I’m also afraid to trust them as much as single layer discs.

Comparing the cost of quality DVDs vs hard drives, hard drives are looking increasingly economical, and they are certainly less time consuming to work with.
I do wonder whether hard drives are stable when stored unpowered. I’ve had an idle hard drive not want to spin up when I reconnected it a few years later.

I don’t trust Flash memory. I’ve had way too high a percentage of bad experiences with it. I’ve seen all the datasheets that always claim 10K or 100K rewrite cycles, but I don’t believe them.
I haven’t had any experience with SSDs, but removable Flash cards/USB sticks are completely unreliable IMO.

I think I’m in a transition towards using hard drives. I’ve been working (slowly) on a linux server for various reasons. The scope of that project keeps expanding, and now I think I’ll be archiving video files on it.

For most videos, I’ve decided they aren’t worth the cost of a 1:1 backup. However, I still need some degree of redundancy or they’re all going to break someday. RAID-5/6 would be a reasonable option, but I don’t like RAID for most things, including this. There’s better ways to protect data IMO. The main value of RAID is uptime, and that’s not very important here.

At the moment I’m tempted to try SnapRAID, which is entirely a software solution and not really a traditional RAID at all. The goals of that project seem to match up well with the needs of archiving large volumes of rarely changed files. It uses a configurable number of parity drives, so you can decide how much redundancy you want without needing to go 1:1.
The feature I like the most is that it maintains a checksum on every file, so it can detect and recover from silent corruption.
It doesn’t need matching drive sizes, and it’s not a big deal to add/remove them, so it’s practical to expand as you go.
Unfortunately it doesn’t look like it can manage hot swapped drives, which is too bad. If the pool got very big I can imagine I’d like to hot swap video drives to eliminate their power usage, but SnapRAID wants them always connected.
Despite that, one good thing about the power is that it only needs to spin up one drive when reading, since the data isn’t striped.


#17

[QUOTE=shamino;2725699]Currently, I mostly use DVD+/-Rs, so that’s how I voted. I don’t have any dual layer, as I’ve never really needed them and they tend to be expensive. Regardless of price, I’m also afraid to trust them as much as single layer discs…[/QUOTE]

Thanks Shamino, it seems you also belong to the majority who prefer DVD, and IMO, you can also try the HDD, it may be not that weak like we think.

And I also had bad experiences with the Flash for a few times, you can imagine the scene how mad I am when I insert it into the USB port and the PC says “Sorry, the flash driver could not be detected, please reformat it”.:sad:


#18

Yeah, CDs and DVDs are probably the safest bet, for longer term storage. For home users.

Or if you have more important data, tape backup. But I think gold CD-R’s will be just as good as tape backups for personal data, for home use.

After all, the data you want to save, documents, pictures and so on, are not that big in size and can be backed up onto optical media.

Then you just need to remember to duplicate it at least once every 5 years or 10 years. In order to safeguard against the original media going bad.