How do I modify burnt audio CDs?

I made a compilation CD and one song is buggered up, probably due to media defects. My CD player then gets stuck trying to play that song. Is there any way I can modify a burnt CD so that the player ignores that particular track?

Unless it is on CD-RW you can’t…

In some cases you might be able to rip it by using good hardware and the right software (EAC or plextools if you have plextor). You then might be able to rip all but that particular song and copy that to a new CD, so you’'ll be able to play at least most songs of the CD

Nah, I don’t need to rip songs from the corrupted CD. I have the set of originals and their ripped tracks on my HDD. I just don’t want to see an otherwise perfect CD being used as a coaster.

I may be oversimplifying matters, but is it possible to directly control the frequency modulation of the laser in my drive? What happens if I replace the 1’s and 0’s to all 1’s? Would I be fixing the problem?

I just want to tell regular CD drives to skip that track (which I didn’t think fit the compilation anyway).

As far as I know you cannot modify a burnt CD

Don’t think there is a program that allows such action, if it technically even possible to accomplish such things on the medium. I think it is not possible to ‘plug a hole’ and change 0s to 1s.

For CD-RWs this is possible, but that is a whole different story.

But then again, the technical part is not my specialty, so someone else might know better and prove me wrong…

Originally posted by Da_Taxman
[B]
Don’t think there is a program that allows such action, if it technically even possible to accomplish such things on the medium. I think it is not possible to ‘plug a hole’ and change 0s to 1s.

[/B]

No, what I meant was you have a song consisting of a string of 1’s and 0’s, like: 010101001…000100101010. Somewhere along that line, a large media defect makes the extrapolation software (which I believe is what is used to correct small errors) unable to predict what is missing. By changing it all to 1’s, the software would be able to extrapolate through the defect with 1’s. i.e. you can guess with certainty the value of “?” in 111111111111?111111, but not in 1001010101010?000101.

Of course I may be quite mistaken here 'cause I’m a CD n00b.

Originally posted by Devils Advocate

Of course I may be quite mistaken here 'cause I’m a CD n00b.

If that was n00b talk…then I am even less than a n00b

It’s not possible to reburn a burned CDR. No burner can do it.

Anyway, all you could do would be burn all, but that would not stand for 111111. First the synchro frames would be missing, the drive would still be stuck on the reburned part. Then even if you paid attention to all the useful data, you would have to modify the burned data, and that would not be always possible.
The data is coded in EFM, then NRZ (see http://www.ee.washington.edu/conselec/CE/kuhn/cdaudio2/95x7.htm for technical details). In order to detect errors, in the code used, only certain patterns are valid. When one bit is changed, the data is imediately detected as corrupted. So, being only capable of burning more, you would often find situations where no more valid codes are writeable adding some burning. So parts of the original data would remain.

Last, the amount of burning is strictly controlled for the laser to keep track of the groove, that’s the role of the DSV explained in the above paper. Burn more, and the groove will be too dark to be read properly. Again, the player will be stuck at the bad point.

Originally posted by Pio2001
http://www.ee.washington.edu/conselec/CE/kuhn/cdaudio2/95x7.htm

I tried going there - that link seems to be broken T.T Does it have IP access control? Some sections of my uni only allows IPs from my uni or registered users access.

Hmmm… the server is not up now, try again another time.