How do I Find Someone to Calibrate MY TV?

vbimport

#1

Hello,

I know there are calibration discs out there, but I know nothing on
the subject and on my 46" Samsung HDTV The 3 different settings are sub par at best…

Does anybody know of any services that do the calibration. I live in West Virginia…

Thanks for any Help…


#2

I really don’t believe you need to recalibrate your TV since the factory default is the best setup for vowing, but if you insist then cal Samsung about this they will help you.


#3

Factory settings are in most cases bad, esp when viewing at home.
Ofield, use a source that’s clean (non CG) and you know what its supposed to look like and tune it. When done take another DVD and do justifications if you think something is a bit off.
//Danne


#4

http://www.hometheatermag.com/advicefromtheexperts/407cali/

excellent link check it out…


#5

Anybody tried this?
http://www.avical.com/calibration.html


#6

Avia II http://www.ovationmultimedia.com/avia2.html
This will help you. I just ordered from amazon, as my ex took my first one.


#7

See if you can buy the service manual. I used to calibrate TV’s and the service manuals give you a lot of info on how to do it. You should get a good calibration DVD first.


#8

http://www.isfforum.com/Find-a-Calibrator/ISF-Forum-Calibrators.html


#9

[QUOTE=TCAS;2003170]I really don’t believe you need to recalibrate your TV since the factory default is the best setup for vowing, but if you insist then cal Samsung about this they will help you.[/QUOTE]

That isn’t true at all! Factory setup is usually too bright, to sharp and with too much contrast. They are set up for bright showrooms. Most people watch TV in a more dim lighted setting. Get the AVIA disc and you should be OK. A professional calibration can easily run you $400. They have special equipment and it will take an hour or 2. The AVIA disc does a reasonably good job.


#10

If you really feel you need to “re-calibrate” your TV return it to an authorized Samsung service center. That being said, you can probably do all the adjustments you need within the user interface. You best bet is to get a DVD that has the "THX Certified " test pattern on it. You probably have a few DVD’s with the set-up patterns. This will get you in to very close to where you need to be. It will save you money and some “Tech” who doesn’t really know what he is doing won’t mess up your TV. You cable service color temperature is probably different than your satellite color temperature as compared to your DVD player. That is why you should fiddle with it using the aforementioned technique. If all else fails then there may be something else wrong. I had a TV repair shop for 8 years and 99% of the time set-up problems had to do with the factory default settings. A lot of TV’s will return to those settings in power is lost or the TV is unplugged.


#11

Ya,
The King Arthur DVD has the THX logo and allows you
to adjust your HDTV. There are others, but that’s the only one I own…


#12

Just an FYI. If you have Blu ray a lot of Sony discs have the picture calibration easter egg: Menu and 7669. Not sure the normal Sony discs have it or not.


#13

Remember to adjust the TV in your regular viewing environment and lighting for best results. If you have the lights up bright so you can read the guide and then turn them down for normal viewing, it defeats the whole purpose. Samsungs are supposed to be notoriously difficult to calibrate. I would google a Samsung forum for tips.


#14

As a general rule, the consumer based “calibration” things like the THX discs are pretty useless. The consumer level discs from Avia and DVE are OK, but do take some time and effort to accomplish. There’s a private donation-based disc available called “GetGray” that has all the necessary test screens for calibrating either with or without light meters. Most videophiles insist on using light meters, but most anyone can get at least passable results without a meter. Proper brightness and contrast are critical, and effect all other display parameters including picture sharpness and color saturation.

The one thing that’s for certain is that careful calibration is the only way to get the most from a monitor, and out of the box settings are WAY off in most cases. It’s also often best to turn off most of the “auto” contrast and gamma settings that a monitor has, but this is not a hard and fast rule. Just be aware that these type controls may be defeating or affecting your other settings. The default setting for “sharpness” should be off or turned very low, and DNR type controls should be off as well in most cases.

[QUOTE=ricoman;2072312]Remember to adjust the TV in your regular viewing environment and lighting for best results. If you have the lights up bright so you can read the guide and then turn them down for normal viewing, it defeats the whole purpose. [/QUOTE]

Exactly correct, lighting is easily the biggest factor that you have control over. Keep all your setting adjustments small, and re-check all other settings whenever an adjustment is made. Be patient. Brightness effects contrast, color and hue, contrast effects brightness, color and hue, etc, etc.


#15

We have all decided which colors are by agreement. No one really knows what each other sees since seeing takes place in the brain,not the eye. You know how things look to you. That is your best guide for viewing. You can use a couple of hundred dollar disc, a shareware one or a THX setup. You could still get it wrong. The best dice about viewing and adjustment maximized to the lighting that you view in is great. If you watch TV at different times of the day or a whole family watches your TV then there is no one optimal adjustment. If you try to become a perfectionists at this, you will never get it right. Make sure the Reds don’t bleed past their borders and that will give you a good start on the overall color adjustment. Look out your windows and see if you can match reality with what you see on your TV. That is the best way to calibrate.


#16

If you have the money and want someone to calibrate your set, you can find them here http://www.imagingscience.com/isf-trained.cfm

Best Buy also does calibration services, but their techs are not certified and their work is not as thorough. Keep in mind getting someone to calibrate your tv will costs a few hundred dollars, how much depends on your setup (# of inputs, etc.).

As mentioned above you can also do it yourself with test discs such as Digital Video Essentials, AVIA or Getgray. I have both DVE and AVIA and AVIA is easier to use. I agree that tv calibration is pretty much a compromise since lighting conditions will skew the results a bit. Even the type of cables (component, HDMI) could vary the colors for each input. But basically you want to be at a happy medium and at the very least, it’ll look better than the factory “torch” settings. The whole point of calibration is to get your tv to look “reference” and accurate, even if you may not like the end result.

If you want to skip all the above and just eyeball it, what you can do is change the setting to a normal or standard mode (not vivid), turn the sharpness to 0 or all the way off and the rest of the settings to 0 and maybe tweak from there.