How do I copy selected chapters to new DVD?

vbimport

#1

I am an opera enthusiast and will be giving a talk to a classical music society early next month. I want to play some sample chapters from an opera I already own on DVD (actually spread over 3 DVDs) and it would make my life much simpler if I could find a way to copy the required chapters to another DVD. On this opera recording, each chapter contains a single aria or chorus lasting just a few minutes. It would be quite tedious for both myself and my audience if I had to select these from the original DVDs.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. I’m technically competent but have no experience of DVD copying (all my DVDs are legal!). While on the topic of legality, let me also say that the music society pays annual fees to the relevant organisations to permit public performance of copyright music recordings.

I want to retain the full picture and sound quality of the original, though I would probably extract a stereo version of the soundtrack, if available, rather than a 5.1 version. Last night, I downloaded a trial version of 1Click DVD Copy Pro but this does not seem to permit chapter selection. I already own Roxio Easy Media Creator 8 but have not yet found a suitable tool in that package. Is there another DVD copy program (to run under Win XP Pro) that would do the job?

It would be even better if I could also select only a portion of some chapters, fading in and/or out as required.


#2

DVD Shrink is a good free program that will allow chapter by chapter editing in it’s Re-author mode, using the ‘start/end’ function. In fact it will even let you edit parts of chapters if you’d like… :wink:

Check out the guides at DVDShrink.info for the how-to.


#3

Thanks, MBK! I’m re-authoring with DVDShrink as I type this post. It looks like a straightforward solution to my problem. I will let you know if anything goes wrong…


#4

The Stream Selections options in the DVDShrink preferences are set to include all languages and I’ve ripped all the desired chapters from my three source DVDs. However, previewing these selected items does not show any subtitles. Is this simply a limitation of the preview screen in DVDShrink or when I burn my compilation to DVD will the subtitle options reappear in a menu?


#5

The preview doesn’t show subtitles, but they should appear on the disc. Just write info files (do not burn) and watch the result with some DVD player software. If all is well, you can burn to disc.


#6

I’m not quite sure what you mean by “just write info files”. The ripped files are already stored on my hard disk - but as a bunch of VOB, BUP and IFO files. I don’t know how to view such files with anything other than DVDShrink.


#7

You can use any DVD player software to view the files created by DVDShrink, e.g. Media Player Classic (freeware), PowerDVD, WinDVD, …


#8

If you kept all subtitle streams in DVDshrink, then all the subtitles ‘will’ be there. But Tru makes a good suggestion, to review the files just to be double sure if you’d like. When you go to the movie folder, inside the VIDEO_TS folder, click on any IFO file and it will either play automatically with your default DVD playback software or it will ask which program you’d like to view the movie with. It will automatically play all the movie files.


#9

Hmmm. Have just downloaded PowerDVD V6 Trial version but can’t yet find any way to select anything other than my DVD drive as the source.

As a separate question, what do I have to do in DVDShrink in order to make it possible to use Roxio Easy Media Creator 8 to burn my compilation to DVD? I don’t have Nero.


#10

To get PowerDVD to play the movie files, do as I outlined above by right-clicking on any IFO file and open with PowerDVD.

I would also suggest that you get IMGBurn (free) to burn your project to disc. Since it is in VOB, IFO files, use the build mode in IMGBurn.


#11

BTW, where did you download the PowerDVD V6??

You should get the free trial of PowerDVD 7 from here…
http://www.cyberlink.com/multi/download/trials_1_ENU.html

sorry, here’s a better link


#12

Many thanks for all the help so far - it’s much appreciated.

As recommended, I’ve now managed to view my compilation by opening one of the IFO files with PowerDVD (I suspect that the PowerDVD version is not a key issue for me at this stage) and was able to view subtitles. I’ve also experimented with using IMGBurn to create an ISO file. I haven’t gone as far as burning a disc yet because I’d first like to find a way to fade my selected clips in and out (fading both picture and sound). Any suggestions on how to achieve this?

BTW, I’ve got Videowave 8 as part of the Roxio Easy Media Creator 8 Suite but this does not seem to recognise the sort of files created by DVDShrink.


#13

Some further issues…

DVDShrink seems to get a little confused about how to categorise the clips in my compilation. After a Re-author session, some Titles are shown as being in the Main Movie while others are listed under Extras. How do I ensure that all clips are listed under Main Movie?

Also, when I eventually burn my compilation DVD how will I select the required subtitle language when playing back on a conventional DVD player (as distinct from a PC)?


#14

Don’t worry about it. You’re not compressing the compilation.

Also, when I eventually burn my compilation DVD how will I select the required subtitle language when playing back on a conventional DVD player (as distinct from a PC)?
You can cycle the subtitles via Subtitle button on the DVD remote.

I haven’t gone as far as burning a disc yet because I’d first like to find a way to fade my selected clips in and out (fading both picture and sound). Any suggestions on how to achieve this?
You need a better authoring software for this. Womble MPEG Video Wizard DVD has transition capabilities. I’m not sure about fading audio capability.


#15

I have two DVD players. Only the more recent one, a DVD recorder/player, has a Subtitle button. My older, but better quality, dedicated DVD/SACD player does not. Without such a button, are subtitles inaccessible?

You need a better authoring software for this. Womble MPEG Video Wizard DVD has transition capabilities. I’m not sure about fading audio capability.
I noticed that Windows Explorer described the VOB files created by DVDShrink as being MPEG files. Just as an experiment, I copied the VOBs to another folder, renamed them as MPGs, and tried Videowave 8 again. This time, they were recognised as valid video files and opportunities appear to exist within Videowave to fade both picture and sound between successive clips. However, there was no sign of any subtitles in Videowave and the process raises the obvious question of what purpose is served by the other filetypes created by DVDShrink, i.e. IFO and BUP. Can anyone clarify this, please?

Being very new to all this, I’m also unsure whether any of these solutions are degrading the video quality in any way (something I am anxious to avoid). I note that Videowave describes the clips as MPEG-2. Is this the same quality as on the original DVD? I’ve seen references elsewhere to something called MPEG-4 but don’t understand the differences between these various flavours.


#16

It should have this button somewhere, maybe it’s labeled under a different name. Check the user manual or the player’s settings. It can’t be called a DVD player without such a button. Otherwise, the only way to access a specific subtitle is through the DVD menu.

Check the Videowave’s functionalities to see if it supports subtitles. If it does not, no worries, just do the transition task. When done, have Videowave outputs as DVD files (IFO, BUP, VOB). Then demux (you can use the freeware PgcDemux for this task) the VOB files as separate video (m2v) and audio elementary streams. Now you need to extract (use PgcDemux) the subtitles from the DVDShrink files and mux them with the Videowave elementary streams again. Use the freeware MuxMan to mux video, audio, subtitles files together.

IFO and BUP files are information files, telling the player how to play the VOB files. BUP is a backup copy of IFO and is used only when the IFO file cannot be read. Without them, you cannot even burn the DVD as Video-DVD, let alone watch them in the DVD player.

Quality won’t be as good as the original once you do the transition as the video has to be modified, but you probably won’t notice the quality degradation that much so you just have to preview it. It all depends on the settings and how good the encoding/transcoding engine of Videowave.

MPEG-4 is a next-gen of MPEG-1, MPEG-2, and Quicktime technology. Google it and you’ll find tons of info.


#17

You are right. I unearthed the manual and the relevant button is labelled Display. Problem solved. I should have worked that one out for myself, but thanks for pointing me in the right direction .

Check the Videowave’s functionalities to see if it supports subtitles. If it does not, no worries, just do the transition task. When done, have Videowave outputs as DVD files (IFO, BUP, VOB). Then demux (you can use the freeware PgcDemux for this task) the VOB files as separate video (m2v) and audio elementary streams. Now you need to extract (use PgcDemux) the subtitles from the DVDShrink files and mux them with the Videowave elementary streams again. Use the freeware MuxMan to mux video, audio, subtitles files together.
I had another look but am still unable to find any reference to subtitles in Videowave 8. Just to make things confusing, the Videowave help index does contain a reference to subtitles, but when you bring up the item it only refers to the use of Disc Copier, another tool in the Roxio suite. Your suggested use of yet two more utility programs to achieve my goal is making the whole process look rather kludgy and non-intuitive (though perhaps it’s simpler to do than to describe). Would my life be simpler if I was to buy another more capable video editor, such as Adobe Premiere Elements? Would that program do all that I need, without recourse to all these shareware utilities?

Quality won’t be as good as the original once you do the transition as the video has to be modified, but you probably won’t notice the quality degradation that much so you just have to preview it. It all depends on the settings and how good the encoding/transcoding engine of Videowave.
Is the quality loss associated with introducing transitions or is it an inevitable result of ripping a commercial DVD? Given that I’m a newbie, I have no idea whose ‘engines’ are better or worse than anyone else’s. Can you recommend any top quality tools in this area? Rather than waste time experimenting and risking disappointment I’d rather use the best tools right from the start. As far as settings are concerned, I’m going for the best quality options right down the line and avoiding any additional compression.

MPEG-4 is a next-gen of MPEG-1, MPEG-2, and Quicktime technology. Google it and you’ll find tons of info.
Yes indeed. It was those very tons of info that caused me to ask the question. I found myself drowning in that info without ever managing to work out whether or not any commercial DVD currently uses MPEG-4.


#18

DVDs are Mpeg-2 streams, and it being in DVD compliant format makes it VOBs with the IFOs (&BUPs). Mpeg-4 is just the newest version of the mpeg stream, and is most used with iPods/Apple. Nero digital is also mpeg-4…

The creation of the MPEG-4 format was an important technological advancement born out of the need for an efficient, high-quality video and audio format.

In the world of mobile digital media, the MPEG-4 format has quickly established itself as the codec of choice for consumer electronic devices such as cameras, mobile phones and more.

The Nero Digitalâ„¢ audio and video codec is completely based on the industry standards MPEG-4 ISO 14496-2/-3/-10, allowing the flexibility to play other popular MPEG-4 content, yet offering additional features and advanced technology that transcends the next two decades.

Nero Vision Express can insert the special effects in between the video clips like you’d like without the need for added processing of the vidoe files. For example, you will just take those VOBs and run them thru Vision Express, add the special effects you want, then it will come out as DVD compliant files (VOB, IFO, BUPs) ready to burn to disc. And it should retain the subttiles, but you can have Vision Express output to the harddrive where you can again review the movi files with PowerDVD to see if the subtitles were in fact retained… (just did a test and it doesn’t reatin the subtitles, so for you not the right program. sorry guy :frowning: )

IMHO, processing video files too many times will cause some degradation to those files, which can lead to improper video encoding, audio sync issues, or outright failure. Also, I would only demux if it is absolutely necessary due to some audio sync issues.


#19

Hmmm. Do you know if Adobe Premiere Elements would also permit the insertion of clip transition effects without affecting quality but retain the subtitling data?

BTW, does the ripping process cause any audio or video degradation and, if so, do different rippers vary in the extent of such degradation?

Regards,
David


#20

The ripping itself doesn’t degrade the video files, it is when you start editing, tinkering with inserting special effects or the like, and doing things like demuxing.

As far as Adobe Premiere Elements, I have never tried it so can’t tell you what it is capable of. Hopefully it will come with a free trial period. :wink: