How did you find out about MID codes?

vbimport

#1

How did you all find out about the existence of MID codes?

They are not exactly emblazoned on the packaging so how did you discover their existence?


#2

What do you mean?

  • How we can tell what MID code a disc has: cdspeed2000.com, dvdidentifier.cdfreaks.com, et al.
  • How we know that MID codes exist: publicly-available specificiations (Mt. Fuji/INF8090, ECMA-279,337,…,etc. specs, et al.) … MIDs are no secret; drive manufacturers sometimes even include codes in their published media support lists, and Philips Licensing has posted a list of “approved” + media codes

#3

@code65536, I think his question was more directed towards the general user/member on our forums, to find out how they discovered MID codes.

@Slim Bim Jim, I believe that many people here would tell you that visiting cdfreaks.com was their source of education on learning about the existence of MID codes. :slight_smile: I know that I learned about it from these very forums.


#4

Didn’t think of that third interpretation. Well, in that case, then I’ll have to say ditto to your answer:

I know that I learned about it from these very forums.


#5

If you mean “what code does this media have”, there are some lists floating around, though much non-prime branded media flits between wherever they can source from, and even some big names can have a nasty surprise.

A few constants… if it says “Made in Japan”, it should be genuine Taiyo Yuden.
Verbatim - probably MCC
Ritek/Ridata - must be a Ritek code.

http://www.speedlabs.org/index.php/topic,23.0.php
Interesting, though you may not agree with some of their classification.

http://archive.speedlabs.org/index.php/topic,357.0.php
And their big list of mid codes.


#6

Wes is right! I was asking how you guys first learnt about MID codes to go looking for them in the first place.

They are not exactly made widely public on the packaging so you wouldn’t know. Kind of like the unlock codes on a cell phone, they are there if you were told about them… But to a normal phone user they are oblivious to them…


#7

i read an article on gamecopyworld (it used to be a different site back then) about cd-r’s and longevity of different dyes. After that i began to check my cd’s with cdspeed and it’s good to know what you’re really buying :slight_smile:


#8

I see. I wonder if this site and Afterdawn are really the only two resource for finding out about the quality of disks?

What percentage of media purchasers do we represent? I reckon about 5% at best. Let’s be honest, I don’t think the average Joe is interested in the transfer quality of a pack of TDKs they bought in K-Mart…


#9

At first it was bc i saw discs behave in ways i didn’t want to (cheaper ones). Next i wondered when nierle.de medtioned the code (media-id) and added excellent disc (ricoh, mcc) I noted the price difference and looked the id’s up in google and ended here. For unknown reasons i’ve been more or less interested in disc behaviour since (Toshiba 5002 was my first dvd-r drive) :smiley:


#10

Are we forgetting:


www.cdrinfo.com
Some german boards like Brennmeister (and there should be some others ) which are in german but contain some quite well informed users who do take there time to do some research !!
Also for countries have some community boards about the subject

Also Dutch/German computer magazines (Not just C’t ) try to inform there users about the MID codes and do some testing.
There is a huge difference when it comes to the quality of testing.
Some magazines go all the way (C’t) some try to make a decent article for the average Joe (Chip) and some simpley screw up (PC consument and I think the first test in PCM)
However every decent Dutch, German computer magazine has showed the public that there is something as MID and that this is more important as the brand. However I personally think that the conclusion has allready been catched up with faked MID’s and weird variations found in brands so that’s why I got back to recommending brands (support, quality, MID ! combined )


#11

My interest in MID codes came about when I first realized that the cheap media I was using had great variability between one spindle and the next. I knew that there must be something to it so I searched the net and learnt about mid codes. I then found that the different spindles of this cheap media (ultran) had different mid codes, this was despite the packaging and brand being otherwise identical.

I still find many vendors that cant (or wont) tell me the true MID code of the media they’re selling. These days I only ever purchase media if I know for sure what the mid code will be.