How come Plextor 716-A is so slow ripping with EAC?

vbimport

#1

The speed averages at 2.4x with test and copy function. Is there any way to speed up the ripping? Thanks.


#2

The 716A’s drawback is the momentarily lack of C2 support within EAC (we are all waiting for a new version) and the drive’s audio caching … not using C2 and enabling the “drive caches audio” checkbox will slow down almost any reader I know of.

You could either try “Test & Copy” in burst mode (I do that a lot) but you’ll have to look at the results closely (the # will indicate a CRC mismatch) as no read errors will be reported - but you’ll notice a great speed-up without sacrificing extraction security (in fact, André Wiethoff stated in this thread that he uses burst mode with T&C all the time).

The other option is to use Plextools Pro (you can do Test & Copy as well, but you’ll have to compare results manually, e.g. with EAC’s “Wav Compare” function) … with Plextools, your 716A will read audio up to 48x with no problem.


#3

Thanks for the reply JeanLuc. So if I rip with test and copy in burst mode, I just have to see if the #'s match in the CRC column? If it matches, then I just ripped a bit for bit quality audio file? There is also a CRC column that displays “ok”, should I look at that as well? Thanks.


#4

There are three columns to look at (you may need to scroll horizontically for that) … the first displays the test CRC, the second displays the copy CRC and the third one (named CRC) displays whether there has been a CRC mismatch (displayed as ‘#’) or whether the CRC’s did match during test & copy (displayed as ‘OK’) … if you encounter a CRC mismatch, just rip again (additionally, you can switch to secure mode for problematic single tracks).

Under drive settings -> offset/speed you can reduce the read speed from ‘actual’ to a slightly lower value (24x or 32x would be just fine) to avoid the so-called ‘timing errors’ (normally, these don’t do anything but could affect extraction quality if you put your system under load while ripping … but this will then result in CRC mismatches so you are notified) … you’ll have to try a bit to find your best setting there.

These measures should significantly speed up your ripping process …


#5

Thanks for the reply, but I think you know that I like to get a definitive answer. So in other words, if the CRC’s match by displaying “ok”, that means I’ll have a bit for bit audio file even if I rip with burst mode? Should I even bother trying to see if the CRC’s match if it displays ok? I don’t really want to do anything to jeopardize the drive’s ability to read them bit for bit perfect. If you can answer my questions directly, that would be greatly appreciated.


#6

Thanks for the reply, but I think you know that I like to get a definitive answer. So in other words, if the CRC’s match by displaying “ok”, that means I’ll have a bit for bit audio file even if I rip with burst mode? Should I even bother trying to see if the CRC’s match if it displays ok? I don’t really want to do anything to jeopardize the drive’s ability to read them bit for bit perfect. If you can answer my questions directly, that would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: Btw, my computer is relatively new so I don’t have to worry about this stressing on the computer. It’s a AMD A64 3000+, Nforce 4 mobo, Maxtor 200GB D10, and etc. ;).


#7

Yes, within the normal limits for CD error correction, that is. If ‘OK’ is displayed, the CRC’s match and you can be pretty sure that you got the correct rip. But as anything, CD error correction isn’t perfect and there remains a small probability that a read error will give the same value twice in a row (even secure mode would be compromised in that situation) … but within the given boundaries, you will be perfectly OK.

No, see above :slight_smile:

Keep in mind that even your state-of-the-art HDD (I assume you got only one) cannot be accessed by two applications at the same time … so while EAC rips and writes data to the disc, you shouldn’t load anything else.


#8

It surely can. While I rip Firefox writes temp files to its cache, the firewall writes to its log and Windoze to Event Log. No problems.

so while EAC rips and writes data to the disc, you shouldn’t load anything else.
Anything that does not stress the storage subsystem should be fine.


#9

I was rather referring to something like opening MS Excel or Photoshop while ripping in burst mode with EAC … you’ll see a bunch of timing errors in the log afterwards and maybe even CRC mismatches :wink:


#10

That can happen. Especially if you run a full system virus scan in the background, just to be safe. 8P