Hospitals in the United Kingdom hit by large scale ransomware attack - emergency patients diverted


#1

Originally published at: http://www.myce.com/news/hospitals-united-kingdom-hit-large-scale-ransomware-attack-emergency-patients-diverted-81986/

British hospitals have become the victim of a large scale cyber attack. Hospitals around the country were hit by a ransomware attack, The Guardian writes. Several hospitals had to divert emergency patients. GP surgeries reportedly had to shut down phone and computer systems while emergency departments have told people to stay away unless it is a real emergency.


#2

14th of March Microsoft released a patch to fix the whole that the virus uses. Time to get some new IT techs on those workplaces that got infected…


#3

I was waiting for this to happen, it’s a wonder it hasn’t sooner. All it takes is one uninformed person with the click click disease to open the wrong thing. My surgery still uses XP, but is not connected to the NHS net. The NHS and IT, now that’s one of the biggest jokes going in the UK.
I lost an important appointment because the hospitals computer system said I didn’t have one. I did however have a conformation letter with me, the receptionist used the words, “Computer says no” with a stupid smile.
I had to start again with a different hospital referral.
To make matters worse, I received a rude letter from the consultant for missing my appointment.
The words “piss ups and breweries come to mind” That took another 7 months of waiting to be seen!
Total time to have the surgery was almost two years in total. Even that was messed up.
We ain’t got a hope in hell health wise here, three to four weeks to see a GP, You are either better, or dead before you get seen. Oh and now you’re forbidden to go to an A&E unless you have been mangled by some horrific accident. Fun, ain’t it :rage:


#4

You think loosing huge quantities of blood counts as an emergency? Walk it off, you wimp. This hospital is only for people experiencing a REAL emergency.:tongueout:


#6

[quote=“voxsmart, post:3, topic:398413, full:true”]
I was waiting for this to happen, it’s a wonder it hasn’t sooner. All it takes is one uninformed person with the click click disease to open the wrong thing.[/quote]

I expected it sooner then later considering all the uninformed users whom click on anything like a caged pet. Why can’t the IT not make it only Admin that can click and log onto installs? Seems like they have not learned enough to remember to do the right thing and that includes the users as well. Why are you clicking on things you have no idea what they are to cause the problem. I thought well educated people knew better but I guess they don’t especially in those institutions. I guess p&&^ links rules the world and that gets them clicking on those P009 links. Guess users can’t get over s5x to be smart about it.

Ransomware only works when the user clicks on it. So you have to ask what the beep is going on in their heads to start with to do something this st**id. Guess in this date and age of click happy people Ransomware will be KING. Otherwise it’s finger chopping off time.


#7

Yeah, unlike with most ransomeware, people only need to have the vulnerability, they don’t need to make a mistake by clicking on a link, or opening an attachment. Once you have the patch you are covered for this rubbish.
Also this time it needed two months until mdfkrs built something on this vulnerability, next time it’s going to be two weeks, or even less.


#8

Couple common sense questions need to be ask?

  1. Why were the staff given Admin Privileges to run or click on unknown ransomware links to install?
  2. How and when will IT learn only give users “Standard” access not Admin access.
  3. Why are people clicking money scam links to get ransomware or worse going to infected sites.

If people stop doing this they would stop Ransomware infections. In this day and age I would’ve thought people learned by now but I guess Ransomware always finds idiots that will click on any links.


#9

Thats an excellent question.
I remember back 2002 when i was in the army we only allowed users* to have access to the very basic programs that they need, nothing more. They complained about it, everyday.
But they still did not have access to install or modify anything :wink:

*mainly students that wanted to download a PDF, write a document and then print it.


#10

When I was at college, it was similar - Students could not install software. Only the IT staff had accounts with Admin privileges.

However, the lack of admin rights did not stop infections spreading to everyone’s e-mail account. For example, while limited user accounts stopped viruses being able to install to run on boot, it had no effect on Word macro infections. Obviously students need access to Word and Microsoft did not provide a way to block macros back then ~2000.

Of course with many students never encountering a virus before, they opened every e-mail and of course once Melissa and the “I love you” viruses struck, everyone got hit with an inbox full of e-mails with the infection. The college had to disable e-mail for a while to clear the infections.

At that time, another issue was “privilege escalating infections”, as Windows 2000 did not offer any sort of data execution protection. This meant that there were many infections that exploited vulnerabilities to run as a system process from a limited user account, requiring the user to do little more than view an infected JPEG or website in Internet Explorer. These are quite rare now although I wonder if this NHS issue was such an infection that could take hold of a system from a limited user account.


#11

[quote=“Sean, post:10, topic:398413, full:true”]This meant that there were many infections that exploited vulnerabilities to run as a system process from a limited user account, requiring the user to do little more than view an infected JPEG or website in Internet Explorer. These are quite rare now although I wonder if this NHS issue was such an infection that could take hold of a system from a limited user account.
[/quote]
Sounds like P08n will never die down because user are always looking for P09n that is why they get infected. Maybe they should change their gender to fix that.


#12

[quote=“Sean, post:10, topic:398413, full:true”]When I was at college, it was similar - Students could not install software. Only the IT staff had accounts with Admin privileges. [/quote]Same here where I work if you tried to install software the Admin login kicks in blocking any installs. And they also have software blocks to prevent people from going to sites not approved as safe sites to go to or view.

[quote=“Sean, post:10, topic:398413, full:true”]However, the lack of admin rights did not stop infections spreading to everyone’s e-mail account. For example, while limited user accounts stopped viruses being able to install to run on boot, it had no effect on Word macro infections. Obviously students need access to Word and Microsoft did not provide a way to block macros back then ~2000. [/quote]That is a MS Office oversight and if they updated their Office correctly they could’ve also got updates to block those Macro infections but then again why are they running Macros they don’t know what the Macros is suppose to do? Wasn’t their education suppose to broaden their horizons to know more before clicking???

[quote=“Sean, post:10, topic:398413, full:true”]Of course with many students never encountering a virus before, they opened every e-mail and of course once Melissa and the “I love you” viruses struck, everyone got hit with an inbox full of e-mails with the infection. The college had to disable e-mail for a while to clear the infections.[/quote]If you get email with odd name or asking for money or love you should already suspect something is fishy here. Doesn’t take a Einstein to know this part.

[quote=“Sean, post:10, topic:398413, full:true”]At that time, another issue was “privilege escalating infections”, as Windows 2000 did not offer any sort of data execution protection. This meant that there were many infections that exploited vulnerabilities to run as a system process from a limited user account, requiring the user to do little more than view an infected JPEG or website in Internet Explorer. These are quite rare now although I wonder if this NHS issue was such an infection that could take hold of a system from a limited user account.[/quote]This is called the famous P09rn picture where they like what they see and click on it causing the infection now if they just keep it in their pants then they don’t have to worry about this but know people they want what others have. But if they have to click on it that usually tells something about their so called love life.