High density or low density DDR

Hi,
I want to upgrade my RAM to a gb and have been looking recently. I found though that there’s something called high density ddr. Apparently it’s 4x128 instead of 8x64 whatever that means. However the high density stuff says it isn’t compatible with all motherboards. I’ve got an asus k8v se deluxe running an athlon 64 3200. Does anyone know if I can use high density ddr or not. The only reason I ask is someone I know is selling some because it doesn’t work in their machine, so I can get it cheap.

Cheers

Hi and welcome aboard!

All you have to do is to look up the memory in the memory compatibility chart of your mainboard (found here). If the memory is in there, you can safely buy it. If not, it may work out, but the only way to find out is to try!

Also, make sure you have the latest BIOS in your system, as that can make the compatibility with memory better…!

Although… is there an issue with having low density (I’m assuming you have low density now) and high density RAM in the same PC?

HD Ram does not work with [U][B]ANY[/B][/U] asus boards

Works on the following chipsets:
VIA CHIPSET:
-VIA KT333
-VIA KT400 (except Asus)
-VIA KT400A
-VIA KT600 (except Asus)
-VIA KT880
-VIA PM800
-VIA P4M800
-K8M800

SIS CHIPSET:
-SIS 645
-SIS 648
-648FX
-SIS 650
-SIS 655
-SIS 661FX
-SIS 650G
-SIS 741GX
-SIS 760GX

Unfortunately, your motherboard, as well as many other motherboards from the likes of Asus and MSI, will not support any memory modules with x4 IC chips (which cram all 16 IC chips onto one rank) - they support the use of only x8 or x16 IC’s. Those modules physically look double-sided, but they are read by the motherboard as having one bank of memory installed (instead of the normal two banks). What’s more, these same motherboards will not support any 128Mbit depth IC chips at all (which means that you cannot use memory modules containing 128Mx4, 128Mx8 or 128Mx16 chips on such a motherboard). Third, if x16 IC’s are used, such motherboards are restricted to single-sided modules only.

As a result, for 512MB modules, you can use only those modules organized in a single-sided 64Mx8 or a double-sided 32Mx8 configuration. (Or put it this way, only normal-density or single-sided low-density DDR memory is supported on your motherboard.)

Just to be a bit more informative, chipset doesnt matter on a Athlon 64 since the memory controller is integrated on the CPU. If it doesnt work its either due to the CPU or motherboard design. Not that I’ve heard of any incompatibilities yet (except for some odd brands) but that doesnt say that they doesnt exist…
//Danne

well i made the error of geting high density DDR ram
and what happen was only half of the ram show up on my compter, even after i flash the BIOS witha new update

a 1 GB of ram only show up as 512 MB- even when my compter had a better chance of use the ram then other, as it use a gigabyte MOBO andf an AMD cpu

well a lot that did me any was

Ok, looks like I was suckered into buying some high density RAM off eBay. It doesn’t seem to be working in my IBM Thinkcentre 8194. The board is a Intel 865G. Does that board [U]not[/U] support high density ram as well??

Look like you have stocked with none useable RAM.

Well, if it doesnt work I think you’ve answered your own question unless its broken.
//Danne

Remember, guys, Intel, NVIDIA and ATi chipsets (regardless of CPU) and AMD Athlon 64 memory controllers (regardless of chipset) do not support “high density” DDR memory (made with x4 IC chips); those systems require memory modules with x8 IC chips (“standard density” modules) in order to work, and any memory modules made with x16 IC chips (“low density” modules) that are to be used in such systems are limited to single-sided (single-ranked) modules only. Only the Socket A and Socket 478 motherboards with a VIA or an SiS chipset will even work with such “high density” modules.

I’ve got a related query…

I bought some 128x64 RAM from eBay and it doesn’t work in my machine. (It’s an AOpen XCCube EZ18 running an Athlon XP 3200, mobo is based on the nVidia nForce2-GT chipset)
The vendor says this is because my board doesn’t support high density RAM which the thread above backs up, but before I bought it I visited the Kingston & Crucial sites to see what spec RAM they recommend for my machine, and both recommend 128x64 modules…
Why would Kingston & Crucial both recommend RAM that won’t work in my machine - I don’t get it and now I’m really confused…
Does anyone know if there’s any way I can find out what spec my current RAM is?

Thanks!

Buy cheap off eBay pays its price in general, next time you may want to spend the extra 5-10 bucks to get memory that actually works.
//Danne

[QUOTE=thejimmer;2004364]I’ve got a related query…

I bought some 128x64 RAM from eBay and it doesn’t work in my machine. (It’s an AOpen XCCube EZ18 running an Athlon XP 3200, mobo is based on the nVidia nForce2-GT chipset)
The vendor says this is because my board doesn’t support high density RAM which the thread above backs up, but before I bought it I visited the Kingston & Crucial sites to see what spec RAM they recommend for my machine, and both recommend 128x64 modules…
Why would Kingston & Crucial both recommend RAM that won’t work in my machine - I don’t get it and now I’m really confused…
Does anyone know if there’s any way I can find out what spec my current RAM is?

Thanks![/QUOTE]

Guess what? You get what you paid for. A lot of memory modules being auctioned on eBay won’t work at all on any motherboard with an Intel or NVIDIA chipset. And the so-called “high-density” modules that you’ve gotten actually have a lot more pieces of IC than is supported by your motherboard. These cheapies have “stacked” IC chips (the eight little chips on each side of the memory module), so that they actually contain 16 pieces of IC per row (line/bank/rank/side). This is the result of those eBay modules using x4 (4-bit) IC chips (e.g. 64Mx4), which no Intel or NVIDIA chipset memory controller supports! You must use memory modules containing x8/8-bit IC chips (or single-sided memory modules with x16/16-bit IC chips) for your motherboard. (In other words, don’t trust eBay for your memory purchase.)

And Intel and NVIDIA chipsets do not support the use of memory modules with more than eight pieces of IC per row. Those cheap memory modules, as it turned out, are only compatible with certain VIA and SiS chipsets which predate the Athlon 64 age.

By the way, “high density” memory modules actually contain much more than eight pieces of IC per row (as I stated above). So-called “low-density” memory modules, by contrast, contain fewer than eight pieces of IC per row. And modern chipsets and memory controllers restrict the support of so-called “low-density” memory modules to single-sided sticks. Reputable-brand memory modules have exactly eight pieces of IC per row (“standard-density”).

To the OP question when you look for DDR on pricewatch and the seller says 128x64. My board uses this type of spec for DDR but the seller doesn’t go much into detail about Hi or Lo-Density DDR? My board manual says not to to x4 chips or stacked memory chips as they won’t work in my board cause of the chipset is KT266. Don’t mean to go off topic but how would I go about getting the seller to tell me if its lo-density or hi-density DDR?

Forgot to say they talked in term of buffered and unbuffered that is what the tech from the online seller in pricewatch told me and never mentioned the Hi or Lo-Density DDR part. That is what is so confusing about RAM now to me.

It does not work on my MSI KT333 with VIA chipset VT8233A.

Hello,

Would anyone know if high density ddr ram is compatible with the [B]Jetway V400ADB-R VIA KT400A Socket A Motherboard[/B]? I read above, and also many other places, that VIA KT400A chipsets (excluding ASUS boards) DO accept high density ram. Is this true?

I can’t find or receive any support at Jetway regarding this, and I am unable to find a detailed manual for the V400ADB board, either at the Jetway sites or on the net. All that came with my MB was a one-sheet zerox copy of certain specs.

Any help would be appreciated. If anyone is able to point me to a full, detailed manual for this MB, I would be eternally grateful as well. I’d like to know more about it than just the ram, of course.

Thanks a bunch.

Cordially,
Jason

Ok, first let me start of humbly - I know I don’t know everything about RAM. I especially am not up on chipsets and their details. My main background is a little bit of programming and mostly networking. My father is the guru when it comes to componant level stuff (he’s an ex-Navy electrician with years of exp).

Three years ago I had to sell a bunch of stuff I had in storage, and I used Ebay. I took half the money I made I decided to reinvest by buying wholesale & reselling the items individually. I wound up settling on RAM, and in the last 3 years I’ve expanded and learned a lot. Like I said though, I’m still looking to learn more, and in that search I came across this webpage. After reading the thread I’d like to say a few things…

First off, please don’t knock Ebay as a source for good products. True, there are a lot of uninformed sellers, but there are also uninformed buyers. Rule #1 is to know as much as you can about what you’re getting. It’s not the seller’s fault if a buyer buys without fully understanding what they’re purchasing (and without asking the right questions). If the buyer DOES ask the right questions and the seller doesn’t know the answers - then don’t buy from that seller! If you still make the purchase, then as RJL65 said - you got what you paid for. But you’d be smarter to keep looking for a seller who knows what he/she is talking about.

The reason this bothers me is because personally, I have taken the time to do the research - and I do sell both high and low density RAM. I have warnings in 3 different places in my auctions and specifically list which models are KNOWN to NOT be compatible, and still I get 5-10 returns a week from people who didn’t bother to read the listing or ask questions.

I would like to say that I think RJL65 has some information wrong about his high/low density facts, namely the number of chips. In a nutshell, the number of chips that determine high/low density will vary depending on the size of the module (256MB, 512MB, etc) and the types of chips that are used. For a layman’s guide to high/low density topics, please check out the guide I’ve posted on Ebay:

If you find anything wrong, please let me know… as I said, I’m open to learning. I just wanted to set a few things straight.

Thanks!
~Steve
SBC Memory