Help with xvid bitrate settings please

vbimport

#1

I have many videos which were ripped in divx using a rival program at a bitrate of 1200. I now want to redo them using fab platinum - generic xvid for a several reasons: 1) beacuse I like the audio passthru concept. 2) because I have read good things about xvid vs divx and 3) because the other program puts black bands on anything in 16:9 ratio which is annoying.
I have tested fab on 16:9 material & it does a good job - so I’m now wondering what bit rate to go with.

I see that fab’s default setting is 900- i’ve done some tests with 900 vs 1200 & don’t see a lot of difference, but as I only want to re-convert my files once I’d appreciate some advice on what settings to use.

these are mostly music lesson files which I’ll use on a computer monitor, not on a large screen TV, and which will be subjected to a lot of pause and rewinds, so crisp picture and + good video audio synch is important. I’ve been trialling zoom player which has a neat frame advance feature for stepping through particular sections in great detail with the mouse wheel.

so should I go for bitrate 1200, replacing like for like , or is xvid at 900 as good as divx was at 1200 ?

& does anyone know why the authors chose 900 as their default ?

oh & one more question please - shoulld I use the default one pass or go for two pass, if two pass works ok - I often see problem reports on this forum for two pass processing ? Processing time is not an issue for me.


#2

All other things being equal, more bits are generally better. If you really want superior image quality, use one of the H.264 profiles and run the bitrate slider up until you get about .3 or .4 bits/pixel. This really looks better on my stuff than any xvid or DiVx (I have the standalone DiVx encoder also). [quote=cybmole;2032312]I have many videos which were ripped in divx using a rival program at a bitrate of 1200. I now want to redo them using fab platinum - generic xvid for a several reasons: 1) beacuse I like the audio passthru concept. 2) because I have read good things about xvid vs divx and 3) because the other program puts black bands on anything in 16:9 ratio which is annoying.
I have tested fab on 16:9 material & it does a good job - so I’m now wondering what bit rate to go with.

I see that fab’s default setting is 900- i’ve done some tests with 900 vs 1200 & don’t see a lot of difference, but as I only want to re-convert my files once I’d appreciate some advice on what settings to use.

these are mostly music lesson files which I’ll use on a computer monitor, not on a large screen TV, and which will be subjected to a lot of pause and rewinds, so crisp picture and + good video audio synch is important. I’ve been trialling zoom player which has a neat frame advance feature for stepping through particular sections in great detail with the mouse wheel.

so should I go for bitrate 1200, replacing like for like , or is xvid at 900 as good as divx was at 1200 ?

& does anyone know why the authors chose 900 as their default ?

oh & one more question please - shoulld I use the default one pass or go for two pass, if two pass works ok - I often see problem reports on this forum for two pass processing ? Processing time is not an issue for me.[/quote]


#3

[QUOTE=signals;2032318]All other things being equal, more bits are generally better. If you really want superior image quality, use one of the H.264 profiles and run the bitrate slider up until you get about .3 or .4 bits/pixel. This really looks better on my stuff than any xvid or DiVx (I have the standalone DiVx encoder also).[/QUOTE]

thanks - I’ll look at h.264- but I also want maximum compatibility so that if I give or lend someone a short video clip they can play it on a PC or a MAC with minimum hassle. Does H.264 need and extra playback software on the target PC ?

another relevant factor is that a lot of my instructional dvds are acutally re-releases of old VHS tapes, so the source quality is not that great anyway. the publishers re-sell this stuff as “new, improved” DVD but can’t or don’t bother to improve the picture any from how it used to look on VHS!

I just don’t want to make the quality any worse :slight_smile:


#4

i did another test at 900kbps 2 pass - the file saze came out as predicted but when I check the .avi file properties in windows I see data rate133kbps.

& when I check the ones that I did at 1200, I see a data rate of 171kbps.

so is windows using a different form of measurement ?

( same phenomeon when I check my older divx file properties in windows - the windows data rate bears no obvious relation to the bit rate used to encode ??? )


#5

Yeah, Windoze reports it wrong.

Use GSpot or MediaInfo.


#6

264 should be no hassle on a mac and none on a PC with ffdshow or VLC Media Player (both free). Although it is probably a waste of CPU power if you’re starting with VHS. Just use DVDFab’s Xvid codec and keep the bits/pixel around .2 and I don’t think you will see much degradation from VHS (if any). Also good info tools for tinkering with MPEG4: AVICodec and VLC (mentioned above) has an info pane that gives some basic file information. So does Yamb.

[quote=cybmole;2032329]thanks - I’ll look at h.264- but I also want maximum compatibility so that if I give or lend someone a short video clip they can play it on a PC or a MAC with minimum hassle. Does H.264 need and extra playback software on the target PC ?

another relevant factor is that a lot of my instructional dvds are acutally re-releases of old VHS tapes, so the source quality is not that great anyway. the publishers re-sell this stuff as “new, improved” DVD but can’t or don’t bother to improve the picture any from how it used to look on VHS!

I just don’t want to make the quality any worse :-)[/quote]