HDTV MPEG-2 or MPEG-4

vbimport

#1

Hi.
In New Zealand we have just started terrestial HDTV transmisions. Our set top boxes sell for $400.00 and are quoted as being MPEG-4.
In Australia, they have had HDTV for over a year and sell their HDTV set top boxes for just over $100.00, but these are stated as being MPEG-2 (only). What does this mean and will the Aussie ones work in New Zealand? For that matter then, will the Kiwi ones work in Aussie.
I would love to bring one back on my next trip over, but will I be just waisting my money?


#2

Without knowing the specifics of the 2 broadcast standards, it’s impossible to say much. MPEG2 and MPEG4 are 2 different compression codecs. A receiver has to be MPEG-4 capable to decode MPEG-4 broadcasts, but often MPEG-4 receivers will also decode MPEG2. An MPEG-2 receiver will not decode MPEG-4.


#3

From what I understand your terrestrial will be broadcasted in[U][/U] MPEG4 and satellite broadcasts will be in MPEG2.

:cool::cool:


#4

Hi. Many thanks to CDan and his informative reply. I suspected as much. Aussie now also has a good range of TV’s with built in HD tuners, but at the moment we have none. I suspect the MPEG-4 is far newer (and better) and they, (the TV’s with HD tuners) will come in due course. Maybe a far smaller market which also means we will have to pay more, until others catch up? Puts off buying a new HDTV set for now as I hate all the extra clutter.
Thanks also to Platinumsword. You are right, of course but I am not talking about the satellite service. That is not HD, although Sky starts its HD Sat service next month at an extra cost.


#5

[quote=RonPyne;2076989]Hi. Many thanks to CDan and his informative reply. I suspected as much. Aussie now also has a good range of TV’s with built in HD tuners, but at the moment we have none. I suspect the MPEG-4 is far newer (and better) and they, (the TV’s with HD tuners) will come in due course. Maybe a far smaller market which also means we will have to pay more, until others catch up? Puts off buying a new HDTV set for now as I hate all the extra clutter.
Thanks also to Platinumsword. You are right, of course but I am not talking about the satellite service. That is not HD, although Sky starts its HD Sat service next month at an extra cost.[/quote]

I thought Freeview was offering the terrestrial HD in MPEG4, and for those that are not in range can get satellite HD in MPEG2.

SkyHD will be MPEG4.

MPEG4 has more flexibility and is more efficient.

:cool::cool: [B]

[/B]


#6

[QUOTE=RonPyne;2076910]Hi.
In New Zealand we have just started terrestial HDTV transmisions. Our set top boxes sell for $400.00 and are quoted as being MPEG-4.
In Australia, they have had HDTV for over a year and sell their HDTV set top boxes for just over $100.00, but these are stated as being MPEG-2 (only). What does this mean and will the Aussie ones work in New Zealand? For that matter then, will the Kiwi ones work in Aussie.
I would love to bring one back on my next trip over, but will I be just waisting my money?[/QUOTE]

AS another Kiwi the answer is no… It’s abit like the old NTSC Vs PAL story before all TVs were multi standard… I see in the Ozzy HD groups that allot of them regret the hodgpodg method in which HiDef was set up there and wish they could go back and do it like the NZ Freeview system… Only recently 576P was considered HD by some Australian networks…


#7

[QUOTE=CDan;2076916]Without knowing the specifics of the 2 broadcast standards, it’s impossible to say much. MPEG2 and MPEG4 are 2 different compression codecs. A receiver has to be MPEG-4 capable to decode MPEG-4 broadcasts, [B]but often MPEG-4 receivers will also decode MPEG2.[/B] An MPEG-2 receiver will not decode MPEG-4.[/QUOTE]

ALL mpeg4 capable receivers will also decode mpeg2.
The modulation counts, either ATSC, DVB-S, DVB-T, DVB-S2 etc…


#8

MPEG-2 VS MPEG-4, which one get higher efinition?


#9

[QUOTE=wulawula;2100722]MPEG-2 VS MPEG-4, which one get higher efinition?[/QUOTE]

They are indistinguishable, given appropriate bit rates. MPEG-4 will give a high quality image at a lower bit rate. MPEG-2 does have some issues with compression artifacts that MPEG-4 does not have, but again with a high enough bitrate you won’t see most of this. In the bit-starved world of satellite and cable, MPEG-4 tends to look better but this is not assured.


#10

You can clearly see the difference when watching sports events via HDTV.
720p will most likely be not that sharp like 1080i is.