HDMI cable or component?

Hi everyone.:slight_smile:

I’ve got a brand new Samsung dvd player 1080p7 model (which upscales/upconverts up to 1080p) connected to a Samsung 32 inch LCD which features 720p res.

I wonder, what is it the best way to connect, HDMI cable, a component one or these will not actually offer too much in a better picture? :confused:

Yo-

Welcome to the forums-

Without any question - [B]HDMI[/B] is your very [B]best [/B]connection-eh!!

Hi Mike,
thanks for replying, should I go for an expensive one or does a simple one do the job?

Moved to the CD Freaks’ High Def section

Like Mike said above HDMI is the best just like is says in the player manual. If the player and TV are CEC capable u can use the TV remote to operate the player, not so with component. The player you bought is 1080P capable but you TV is not so you are best to set the player’s output to the TV’s native resolution 720P. Your TV probably won’t accept 1080P anyway. Monoprice.com is a good place to look for good prices on HDMI cables. Depending on where you live.:slight_smile:

Yeah right,
thanks a lot for the advice

Unless you need HDMI for something else use it, I do doubt you’ll notice a difference between HDMI and component given that it upscales using component.
//Danne

There are only two companies that have upconvert via component that I am aware of, Oppo and LG. I believe that your Samsung only upconverts via HDMI so this would be the logical choice.

:cool::cool:

Plus by using HDMI you are dealing with one single cable integrated (3 color wires for video + 2 wires for audio) versus using 5 wires (one cable with 3wires for video + another cable with 2 wires for audio). Less space les noise interference.

Call my crazy but I cant even tell the difference between svideo quality and component.

Okay, your crazy :bigsmile:

S-Video is capable of displaying only 480i or 576i

Component is capable of displaying upto 1080p.

So there is a big difference.

Options are.

HDMI - One cable carries both audio and video - The best

DVI + Optical or Coaxial - One cable for audio and one for video - Second best

Component + Optical or Coaxial - One cable for audio and one cable with three heads at each end for video. - Third best

ETC

Component + RCA
S-Video + RCA

No need to go on.

@kimonas1000 - Just keep in mind that you can never exceed the maximum display resolution of your T.V. , anything that exceeds it will be down converted to meet the max resolution of your T.V.

:cool::cool:

[QUOTE=kimonas1000;2007372]Hi Mike,
thanks for replying, should I go for an expensive one or does a simple one do the job?[/QUOTE]

HDMI is a DIGITAL signal, not analog, so as long as the cable is physically working, there is no difference in the signal.

monoprice.com usually has some very good prices on cables.

I did a little research about cables when I bought some new large screen LCD’s. I didn’t even think about the cables until I found out how damm expensive some are. I wanted to know if it was worth spending the money for the Monster type ones or not.

As for the argument that “if the signal is digital all cables would work the same…” I found this is not true… check these links out:

http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2007/06/the_truth_about_monster_cable_1.html

http://www.dtvforum.info/index.php?showtopic=33273

Seems that the better cables do work better and some cheap ones are not worth buying at all.

I bought some Crest brand “platinum” cables for about $39 at Big W here in Adelaide, after trying Truscotts and getting told they were $80 but the kind salesman would let me have them for $60(yes, exact same cables). Lucky I had seen them at Big W first!

I have not noticed any picture problems at all.

BTW, the cables were only 1.2m a little limiting when hooking the laptop up to play blu-ray movies.

Hey Haque I post some information about this earlier before , if you check out this thread there will be some other links for you to check out if your interested.

Link: http://club.cdfreaks.com/f149/expensive-hdtv-cable-really-better-than-cheap-one-239888/

:cool::cool:

[quote=HaQue;2077090]I did a little research about cables when I bought some new large screen LCD’s. I didn’t even think about the cables until I found out how damm expensive some are. I wanted to know if it was worth spending the money for the Monster type ones or not.

As for the argument that “if the signal is digital all cables would work the same…” I found this is not true… check these links out:

http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2007/06/the_truth_about_monster_cable_1.html

http://www.dtvforum.info/index.php?showtopic=33273

Seems that the better cables do work better and some cheap ones are not worth buying at all.

I bought some Crest brand “platinum” cables for about $39 at Big W here in Adelaide, after trying Truscotts and getting told they were $80 but the kind salesman would let me have them for $60(yes, exact same cables). Lucky I had seen them at Big W first!

I have not noticed any picture problems at all.

BTW, the cables were only 1.2m a little limiting when hooking the laptop up to play blu-ray movies.[/quote]
Expensice HDMI Cables are a rip.
HDMI specifies a minimum performance requirement, excluding length (as it’s irrelevant on the proviso it satsifies the performance requirements).
A cable either complies, or doesn’t.

I paid $15au on ebay for a 1.8m HDMI v1.3 compliant cable, including P&H.
BigW, like kmart, target & all the other B&M stores are like a vacuum cleaner in your pocket. They don’t charge a price that’s suggested by the cost of the product, but a price that the market will bear.

You will be hard pressed to find a short HDMI cable that doesn’t satisfy the requirements. Congratulations if you have, you should be presented with an award shortly.
At any rate, if it doesn’t comply, you can take it back for a refund, preferably strangling the salesman for selling shoddy non-compliant products.

Over large lengths 10m-15m, higher quality cables become important. $300 for a 2m cable is nothing short of snake oil & support of an oversized, overly creative marketting department.

Thanks platinumsword for the link, very interesting to watch :slight_smile:

I am not going to debate this too much, as I do agree that for the average person, the Crest type from BigW or the ebay ones will probably do just fine.

I will say that where the issues with substandard cables would be in poor soldering/cable to connector fixing, bad shielding, substandard materials used for insulation(even poor copper choice) and general manufacturing issues that every product with expensive and cheap options would face. But hey, we aren’t swinging around by them, for the most part they would be hooked up once and forgotten.

And if you are going to wire up your house, it might pay to get something “good”… just good luck finding out for sure what that is! :slight_smile:

remember that something that is compliant to a certain spec in no way implies the quality of the job it is gonna do. And just going by the price isn’t always the best way either.

I believe a healthy debate on a forum is a great step to getting real answers so thanks to all that have voiced!

BTW, my crest cable seems to be doing the job just great! Bioshock in HD is awesome!

Wiring up a house with HDMI cables wouldn’t be recommended - the maximum length available commercially is about 15m (50ft?) regardless, and they only come pre-made.
You’d be better off with a HDCP compliant, HDMI v1.3 compliant HDMI over (dual) Cat5e cables, which extends the maximum length upto 60m (30m for slightly cheaper versions).
You still need short HDMI cables at each end (of course).

[quote=debro;2078152]Wiring up a house with HDMI cables wouldn’t be recommended - the maximum length available commercially is about 15m (50ft?) regardless, and they only come pre-made.[/quote]monoprice.com offers up to 131 ft (40m) of HDMI cable: http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024005&p_id=3026&seq=1&format=2

From http://www.hdmi.org/learningcenter/faq.aspx#44

[B]Q. Does HDMI accommodate long cable lengths?[/B]
Yes. HDMI technology has been designed to use standard copper cable construction at long lengths. In order to allow cable manufacturers to improve their products through the use of new technologies, HDMI specifies the required performance of a cable but does not specify a maximum cable length. We have seen cables pass “Standard Cable” HDMI compliance testing at lengths of up to a maximum of 10 meters without the use of a repeater. It is not only the cable that factors into how long a cable can successfully carry an HDMI signal, the receiver chip inside the TV or projector also plays a major factor. Receiver chips that include a feature called “cable equalization” are able to compensate for weaker signals thereby extending the potential length of any cable that is used with that device.

With any long run of an HDMI cable, quality manufactured cables can play a significant role in successfully running HDMI over such longer distances.

[B]Q. How do I run HDMI cables longer than 10 meters?[/B]
There are many HDMI Adopters working on HDMI solutions that extend a cable’s effective distance from the typical 10 meter range to much longer lengths. These companies manufacture a variety of solutions that include active cables (active electronics built into cables that boost and extend the cable’s signal), repeaters, amplifiers as well as CAT5/6 and fiber solutions.

My lord that is a long cable…

Yeah… I tried the 35’ from monoprice and it’s doing great. Some of the customer comments say they see white sparkles on their HDTV after installing >50’ cable and some don’t but they suggest to add a repeater if you plan to run greater than 35’ (also in the FAQ posted above).