HDD temperatures - critical?

Hello :slight_smile:

I have two HDD’s in my computer, both are IDE. One is a 5.400 rpm 120 GB Maxtor which holds only the OS (Windows Vista and Windows XP), the second one is a 7.200 rpm 500 GB Western Digital which holds all data.

The first drive is forcibly cooled by a three-fan HDD cooler that sits in a 5 1/4" bay with the drive behind it, this one reaches a temperature of max. 42 degrees Celsius under heavy load (virus scan!).

However it’s the second one that got me a little worried - it goes up to 50 degrees Celsius if under heavy load, and THAT drive is ALWAYS under heavy load - torrenting all day long. It too sits in a 5 1/4" bay but i can not put a cooler there too.

The temperatures are measured with “SpeedFan” while the ambient temperature (air temperature in my room) is 30-32 degrees Celsius (It’s Thailand and always hot).

Do i need to worry about these temperatures or is it still ok? I have an identical 120 GB Maxor as well as an identical 500 GB Western Digital, each in external enclosures, and i keep regular backups (Vista has such an easy backup function i’d be stupid NOT to use it).

Best regards…

Thanh

These temperatures seems a bit high to me. I don’t know actually if are critical, but I’d like to see lower temps.

The cause, in my opinion, is a bad ventilation in the case, because hot air is not removed correctly. 5" bays are not the very best for a HDD. I suggest to install discs on a 3.5" bay in the case, adding a single 12 cm fan blowing air on them. This in most of cases is sufficient to keep discs cool.

Another thing you can do is add a rear fan blowing out the hot air, enhancing thus the case ventilation.

Another possibility is a purposely suited cage to be installed on 5" bays that already has a preinstalled fan to cool HDDs. Usually these cages can hosts 3 HDDs. See pics as examples :slight_smile:

pic 1

Pic 2

[QUOTE=geno888;1950881]
Another thing you can do is add a rear fan blowing out the hot air, enhancing thus the case ventilation.[/QUOTE]
This summer i had a similar problem with my 7200.10 Seagate (temperatures rising above 50C). Fisrt i tried adding a rear fan, but it didn’t help (temp 1C lower), the i decided to get this thermaltake cooler. It was dirt cheap and the temps went 15 C lower.

I think 50 degrees Celsius will shorten the life of the drive considerably. I keep mine under 40 degrees.

The temperature reported by some drives is incorrect, but my WD drives seem to be correct. You can get an idea of how accurate it is by looking at the drive temperature soon after the computer is powered on. At that time it should be close to room temperature.

[quote=steve b;1952039]I think 50 degrees Celsius will shorten the life of the drive considerably. I keep mine under 40 degrees.[/quote] It was generally thought that high drive temperatures would shorten the lifespan of harddrives, but a paper published by Google using statistics from their enormous server farm showed that there was almost no correlation between drive temperature and failure rate.

My RaptorX runs at 55c on constantly. No problems.:iagree:

Older Maxtor HDD’s run genarally hotter then many others. Get a Seagate HDD and your temperatures will be 5-6 degrees Celsius* lower. ([I]Note,[/I] Maxtor is nowdays owned by Seagate.)

I’ve Antec Nine Hundred compu case and my 300GB/16Mb/7.5k rpm IDE HDD runs at 27 to 30 degrees when on stress.
Linky.

*The man that gave this name was born in ol’ Sweden.

Samsung are usually the lowest.

[QUOTE=IdontexistM8;1953958]Samsung are usually the lowest.[/QUOTE]

Hitachi & WD :iagree::iagree:

Try the Western Digital 1 TB Green Power drive that spins at 5400 RPM. That is cool and quiet.

[QUOTE=LivingDay;1954210]Try the Western Digital 1 TB Green Power drive that spins at 5400 RPM. That is cool and quiet.[/QUOTE]

But with this green stuff you sacrafice performance.

[QUOTE=IdontexistM8;1953958]Samsung are usually the lowest.[/QUOTE]

My Samsung reports the lowest temperature, but it’s not accurate. When I first power on my computer, it shows about 5 degrees Celsius below room temperature.

[quote=steve b;1954455]My Samsung reports the lowest temperature, but it’s not accurate. When I first power on my computer, it shows about 5 degrees Celsius below room temperature.[/quote] Look in your BIOS, you can ususally see the correct temp there. At least I can with my Asus board. [B]EDIT;[/B] Now that I am thinking about it, I may be wrong , it may just show the CPU Temps. Sorry.

Some softwares like HDTune (free and portable) can show HDD temperatures easily :slight_smile:

I use Everest. It’s no longer free, but it might be worth the $35. It’s pretty good stuff. You can still get the old free version from majorgeeks.com.

Check out SilenX.com for some cooling options!

[QUOTE=THE C.;1954263]But with this green stuff you sacrafice performance.[/QUOTE]

Yes, but the drive is still a decent performer when compared to most other 7200 RPM drives. My system drive is a Raptor. The WD is a great storage drive.

you should check the manufacturer’s website to find what the optimal operating temperatures are. if it’s within the range then it’s ok.