Hdd problem

160gb hdd(western india) showing 127 in windows 2000 server service pack -4.Plz show what reason & soulation.

No solution because thats hardware related (motherboard bios).

or use NTFS

This is probably “the 48 bit LBA” problem
–> http://48bitlba.com/

MS solution for W2k: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/305098

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2562884]or use NTFS[/QUOTE]No. The file system does not matter.

Michael

[QUOTE=mciahel;2562949]No. The file system does not matter.

Michael[/QUOTE]If his motherboard can support LBA there is a good possibility it was installed via FAT.

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2562959]If his motherboard can support LBA there is a good possibility it was installed via FAT.[/QUOTE]And what is the problem with FAT32 in this case?

This HDD must have been preformatted in FAT32 using 3rd party software then, since the formatting routine of NT5.x and newer is restricted to support up to 32GB only.
On the other hand, NT5.x has no problems dealing with much larger FAT32 formatted volumes (which then were formatted with 3rd party software).

Michael

a 160gb drive showing as a 127gb drive is typically a problem with the intel chipset on the Motherboard.
Probably also the MoBo Bios as well because both of these have issues partly because the bios translates the LBA…

Intel chipsets earlier than i865 have sever issues recognizing the full size of any HDD larger than 127.5gb

And since many earlier MoBo’s shipped in computers factory set up with XP are too early for
the i865 chipset then any computer shipped with Win2000 is probably “too early” as well…

You CAN get the drive recognized by using an aftermarket IDE controller card.
I personally recommend the Silicon Image/Adaptec chipset cards, as I’ve had nothing but
grief with the Promise/Maxtor branded cards, and I have insufficient experience with the
Via chipset cards to recommend for or against them.

However there is a tendency for the driver for the cards (particularly the Promise cards)
and when that happens if the drive is formatted to it’s full capacity the Chipset can’t "see"
the drive.So if you use it as a System drive and the driver becomes corrupted the computer
won’t start… “Boot device not found” will become your most hated four words.

There is allegedly a “software fix” to allow “large drives” on early Pentium4
MoBo’s but I’ve never seen it implemented… reliably…

Frankly I just got rid of the last, the very, last desktop computer that I’m responsible
for that had a chipset earlier than the i865P

The VERY last computer that early is the Dell 4600 that my mother uses for photo editing.

a Motherboard with an intel chipset newer than the i865 will accept drives of any size
without these issues.

I don’t know at what point the AMD board became compatible with larger logical bit adress drives

Frankly to solve this problem I’d suggest it’s time to seriously consider upgrading your Motherboard.

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[QUOTE=mciahel;2562972]And what is the problem with FAT32 in this case?

This HDD must have been preformatted in FAT32 using 3rd party software then, since the formatting routine of NT5.x and newer is restricted to support up to 32GB only.
On the other hand, NT5.x has no problems dealing with much larger FAT32 formatted volumes (which then were formatted with 3rd party software).

Michael[/QUOTE]

You are completely right.

There have been cases where i’ve seen it to be a FAT limit, indeed because of strange 3rd party software formatting or strange driver.

However, it’s totally not worth the risk using software drivers to circumvent a hardware problem . Especially not on a server! (Since the poster uses W2K SP4, LBA48 support is already embedded in the OS.) As the previous poster already mentioned it is highly unstable.

Just get another controller or new motherboard.

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2563003]
However there is a tendency for the driver for the cards (particularly the Promise cards)
and when that happens if the drive is formatted to it’s full capacity the Chipset can’t "see"
the drive.So if you use it as a System drive and the driver becomes corrupted the computer
won’t start… “Boot device not found” will become your most hated four words.
[/QUOTE]

This paragraph should have read:

However there is a tendency for the driver for the cards (particularly the Promise cards) to either lose or corrupt the driver and when that happens if the drive is formatted to it’s full capacity the Chipset can’t “see” the drive.So if you use it as a System drive and the driver becomes corrupted the computer
won’t start… “Boot device not found” will become your most hated four words.

I’ve installed 160gb drives in several computers that have earlier chipsets/BIOS that won’t accept a 160gb or larger drive.

It was always for customer’s notebook computers who were willing to spend an extra $10 on the HDD (over the cost of a 120gb drive) and get that “other” 7.5gb that a 120gb drive wouldn’t give them.

On a Desktop if they REALLY want a computer (on-the-cheap) that’ll accept a bigger drive I can usually turn up a slightly newer MoBo with an acceptable 865, 875 or newer chipset.
OR I install an Adaptec/Silicon Image controller for a SATA drive
as a data drive. These tend to be FAR more stable in terms of driver installation than the various IDE controllers I’ve played with.

But in the end this is as chef replied above “a [I]hardware[/I] problem”, not a problem with the HDD.

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