HDD Image software?

vbimport

#1

I know we talked about this before but I like to update this discussion and ask for some more specs info. I currently have and use Ghost 2003 to do imaging of my IDE HDD to another HDD for backup and restore purpose. But unforuntaly I tried and tried to use it on Sata but not going to happen. They I am doing ghosting is by using a Floppy disk with the ghost program on it and using to boot and restore with instead of using from the windows setup. I do this so that I don’t have that program on the HDD itself. Is there another program that does this same process where it will copy itself onto a bootable Floppy, Flashstick, CD/DVD media that doesn’t require to have the software installed onto the HDD itself but also support Sata imaging to either Sata or IDE HDD drive? I like it better when I can use the Floppy to backup my IDE based computer cause I don’t have to have the software installed onto the drive. I discovered this process when I was using Ghost 2003 it created a bootable Floppy drive that I could use to Ghost my IDE drives. I did remove the Ghost software from the HDD but now that I have it on the Floppy it saves me time to image the HDD each time I do a new update or O/S update saving having to do a complete reinstall.


#2

Acronis True Image:

http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/

Can create bootable CD / DVDs, flash memory, floppies etc., so you can start it without having the program installed on your computer. And generally speaking, it’s the most feature rich, stable and reliable disk imaging software on the market.


#3

It’s possible (but tedious) to upgrade Ghost 2003 to a release that supports SATA drives. There’s a thread about it somewhere on our forums…found it:

http://club.cdfreaks.com/f3/norton-ghost-v-250439/#post2108988


#4

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2145857]It’s possible (but tedious) to upgrade Ghost 2003 to a release that supports SATA drives. There’s a thread about it somewhere on our forums…found it:

http://club.cdfreaks.com/f3/norton-ghost-v-250439/#post2108988[/QUOTE]

The last time I check the Floppy I created with Ghost it was .793 and it didn’t work with Sata rather it locked the computer and I had to reinstall the O/S again…


#5

[QUOTE=packetloss;2145855]Acronis True Image:

http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/

Can create bootable CD / DVDs, flash memory, floppies etc., so you can start it without having the program installed on your computer. And generally speaking, it’s the most feature rich, stable and reliable disk imaging software on the market.[/QUOTE]

Ok, I take another look at Acronis again…later when I get home…at least this weekend gives me time to experiment again…cause I am thinking of reinstalling my O/S to give it a fresh reinstall.


#6

Do you have a maxtor or seagate HDD then you can use maxblast 5 to clone or install any sata or ata drives.
Built into the software is a version of Acronis image maker and it is free!!
The only caveat is that there must be a maxtor or seagate drive attached to the system. I have used it myself and find the backup program very good, it is a newer version of Acronis than the current version 9 I bought.
I haven’t tried it on a SATA drive so I can not say how good it is although the software says that it will backup both types of drive.
If you can use it I would be interested what you think of it.


#7

[QUOTE=weedougie;2145914]Do you have a maxtor or seagate HDD then you can use maxblast 5 to clone or install any sata or ata drives.
Built into the software is a version of Acronis image maker and it is free!!
The only caveat is that there must be a maxtor or seagate drive attached to the system. I have used it myself and find the backup program very good, it is a newer version of Acronis than the current version 9 I bought.
I haven’t tried it on a SATA drive so I can not say how good it is although the software says that it will backup both types of drive.
If you can use it I would be interested what you think of it.[/QUOTE]

I Have all WD HDD. I usually tell people stay away from priority software as they don’t cover everyones needs incase they don’t use a maxtor or seagate. That when your out of luck. No I don’t have Sata HDD yet but in the future maybe all I have now are my good reliable IDE drives.


#8

Have a look at this http://ping.windowsdream.com/.
It’s open source and supposed to be better than Ghost.


#9

[QUOTE=kcomfz;2146106]Have a look at this http://ping.windowsdream.com/.
It’s open source and supposed to be better than Ghost.[/QUOTE]

That sounds and the from the website is for Linux O/S. What I wanted was a standalone media that didn’t require it installed onto the Main HDD. I downloaded Acronis and made a recover Acronis cd and so far it seems to work ok. But there is no indication that it supports Sata drives? They don’t seem to even mention Sata drives on there for their support?


#10

Actually, it is a Linux product, but, as it says:
Features include:

* Probably the best available Linux toolbox for rescuing a system;
* Backup and Restore partitions or files locally or to the network (MS Network Shared directory, NFS, FTP or SSHFS);
* Backup and Restore the BIOS data as well;
* Either burn a bootable CD / DVD, either integrate within a PXE / RIS environment;
* Possibility to Blank local admin's password;
* Create your own restoration bootable DVD (see the Howto Documentation);
* Partition and Format a disk before installing Windows (so to make sure your unattended Windows installation will happen on the right partition);

* Specific advantages PING brings you over DOS and Ghost :
      o Most network cards automatically recognized by the Kernel (unlike DOS);
      o Most CD/DVD readers automatically recognized by the Kernel (unlike DOS);
      o You don't have to run a Ghostcast server to receive images over the network;
      o More supported filesystems;
      o You can store an image on several CD/DVD (CD/DVD-spanning);
      o You can backup and restore BIOS settings too;
      o Much much smaller than WinPE / BartPE;
      o etc.

I personally know that it WILL work with SATA drives.
Our IT Department used this when “downgrading” our new PCs from Vista to XP Pro this last month.

Here is a link to download the How-to as a .pdf, .doc, or browse online.
http://ping.windowsdream.com/ping/download.html

Michael

edited - forgot the link


#11

Update on Acronis from cd media to backup my computer took almost 2 hours long time…but for ghost it took only 20 min or so? And both are on high or max compression. I thought it would take about the same time as Ghost to do imaging of the HDD? But I also did look at the backup image file where as ghost depending on how big the HDD is had four image files which each as about 1G totaling out to be 7.14G as Acronis was only one file image about 6.71G in size. Is Ghost faster cause it keeps the image files smaller making it faster in making HDD images then Acronis? Can someone better explain this process to me more?


#12

Use the default ‘normal compression’ in Acronis True Image. Max. compression will only give you a slightly smaller image, but is considerably slower so it’s not really worth the wait.


#13

[QUOTE=packetloss;2146378]Use the default ‘normal compression’ in Acronis True Image. Max. compression will only give you a slightly smaller image, but is considerably slower so it’s not really worth the wait.[/QUOTE]

I am in agreement 100%.
No reason to use anything other than standard compression.

Typical Acronis backup time for me is extremely low.

Acronis True Image Home 2009 v12 backs up my Operating System (Partition C) in about 4 minutes. This is a 20GB partition with approximately 8GB used.

It backs up the partition with the installed programs (Partition D) in about 2 1/2 minutes. This is a 30GB partition with approximately 4GB used.


#14

I have very similar back up times using standard compression on Acronis. A 32 gb partition with 10.5gigs of programs.
The best part is less than 10 minutes to restore a buggered drive, against almost a day the hard way.:bigsmile:


#15

I should’ve asked that about the compression but didn’t know til I tried it. Well then I just keep it standard and try again and see how fast it goes. I have about 12.5G on a 20G HDD. But where do I find out if it support Sata drives cause it doesn’t mention it from looking around?


#16

It also helps if you move the page file to its own partition or drive. Makes the image smaller too.


#17

[quote=weedougie;2146746]It also helps if you move the page file to its own partition or drive. Makes the image smaller too.[/quote] Depends on the imaging software. Most commercial imaging software save space by not including the content of the pagefile and hibernate file.


#18

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2146772]Depends on the imaging software. Most commercial imaging software save space by not including the content of the pagefile and hibernate file.[/QUOTE]

Usually listed in the [B]Exclusion[/B] Options.

Neverless, I normally excersice a massive cleanup campaign prior to creating a new backup image.
I clear all cookies, Temp files, Temporary Internet Files and run [B]chkdsk[/B] on the partitions to be backed up.

Additionally, I disable System Restore, reboot, and re-enable it to reduce the capacity of the System Restore files.
This is only recommended if you are confident that your system has no current issues and the previous restore points are no longer required.

I normally purge any Restore Points prior to my previous backup image creation.

This is followed by malware and anti-virus scans prior to imaging.

This accounts for a smaller image file and ensures that previous baggage is not transferred.


#19

Ok, I created another working image with Acronis back from cd. Is there a way to see and find how long it took to do the imaging file? I wasn’t at the computer when it finished? But from the first time it started it indicated 1 hr and 30 min???


#20

As far as I know, there is no log created wenever the Bootable Rescue Media is employed.

You’ll simply have to create another backup image to determine the length of the process on your system.

The initial remaining time displayed is normally usually hign, but quickly adjusts within the first 30 seconds.