Have I caused damage to my DVD RW?

vbimport

#1

Not proud of this but anyway… About a week ago my motherboard bit the dust at the worst time possible, and in my frustration I slammed my fist down on top of my computer case… This was while the computer was powered on (though it wouldn’t even post due to faulty motherboard) with a disc in the drive, though idle, not spinning I am pretty certain.

Now my DVDRW (Samsung S202) is located about three drive bays down form the top of the case, underneath my sound card controller. My question is, how likely is it that there has been any damage caused to the drive? I am particularly concerned about this as my previous DVD writer degraded and started physically (and stealthily) cracking discs due to, what I suspect, was an instance of impact/vibration.

More than anything… I do not want a repeat of that particular fault! So what can they generally withstand? I have so far tested the tray (which opens and closer fine), and it accepts discs and appears to read them fine as well. Although I can’t test it properly as my computer is broken and won’t post (new parts coming next week).

So can I expect my drive to be damaged?


#2

Hi,

your drive might have survived this attack, but there is no way to find out until the drive is connected again to a working system.
I would be more concerned about the HDD.

Michael


#3

[QUOTE=mciahel;2502927]Hi,

your drive might have survived this attack, but there is no way to find out until the drive is connected again to a working system.
I would be more concerned about the HDD.

Michael[/QUOTE]
Yes I was concerned mainly for the well being of my HDD at first, but upon doing some research on impact/vibration tolerance, it appears that hard disks (or at least my one) can withstand a lot of g’s. Even while active.

And it also sits in an almost ‘floating’ HD rack at the back of the case, so I’d imagine (hope) any shock to it was minimized.

It seems DVD RW are a lot more vulnerable though…

If I was to test it by spinning an unwanted audio CD in it for a few hours, could I then consider the drive solid and safe to use if the disc returns undamaged? Or are they any better ways to test it that you have in mind?

Also what is the likelyhood of the disc cracking problem (which my last drive experienced) re-occuring again with this drive? I would think, given the lack of cases on it, that it would be a rare thing.


#4

Hi,[QUOTE=Drisc;2502958]Yes I was concerned mainly for the well being of my HDD at first, but upon doing some research on impact/vibration tolerance, it appears that hard disks (or at least my one) can withstand a lot of g’s. Even while active. [/quote]I’d be not that sure about this.
If your machine is operational again, check your HDD using the diagnostic tool from the HDD manufacturer.

It seems DVD RW are a lot more vulnerable though…
Hm. They are made of cheap plastics, indeed. So they can break also.

If I was to test it by spinning an unwanted audio CD in it for a few hours, could I then consider the drive solid and safe to use if the disc returns undamaged? Or are they any better ways to test it that you have in mind?
This “test” is an excellent method to shorten the lifetime of the drive (Have I already mentioned, they are made of cheap plastics?)
No, not a good idea.

I personally would sacrifice a blank CD and a blank DVD and do a test drive with Nerö CD/DVD Speed. After some registry modifications (see my sig please) you can estimate the burn quality of the DVD.

Also what is the likelyhood of the disc cracking problem (which my last drive experienced) re-occuring again with this drive? I would think, given the lack of cases on it, that it would be a rare thing.

A disc desintegrating in the drive while spinning at 10k rpm (or something like that) is usually pre-damaged and had some tiny cracks before - that’s why the drive’s manual advises not to insert damaged discs into the drive.

Michael


#5

No offense to the OP, but what is the sense of worrying about it. You’ll never really know until you replace the MB and try it, so why worry about something you have no control over. The worst case scenario is it’s damaged, but you can get great drives for $30 these days, so it’s not worth the time worrying about it.


#6

[QUOTE=mciahel;2503055]Hi,I’d be not that sure about this.
If your machine is operational again, check your HDD using the diagnostic tool from the HDD manufacturer.
Hm. They are made of cheap plastics, indeed. So they can break also.[/QUOTE]
Yeah I usually do regular runs of Western Digital’s Diagnostic program. Even though I have owned this HD for quite a few years, it has always passed the test. My HDD is an old WD Raptor 150GB btw. I will definitely do a run once I get my new system parts and get my machine up and running next week.

This “test” is an excellent method to shorten the lifetime of the drive (Have I already mentioned, they are made of cheap plastics?)
No, not a good idea.

I personally would sacrifice a blank CD and a blank DVD and do a test drive with Nerö CD/DVD Speed. After some registry modifications (see my sig please) you can estimate the burn quality of the DVD.

Okay noted, thanks for the warning. I might try what you suggested then.

A disc desintegrating in the drive while spinning at 10k rpm (or something like that) is usually pre-damaged and had some tiny cracks before - that’s why the drive’s manual advises not to insert damaged discs into the drive.

Michael

Ah right I see. Maybe my old drive (which I replaced with my current one) wasn’t actually damaged after all then and there was no need to replace it! When I had the disc’s cracking, they never actually shattered though, I just remember noticing small hairline cracks coming out from around the inner hole of my game discs. Although I’m pretty certain all these discs never had any cracks to begin with before running them in that drive… So I dunno it’s just strange…

Anyhow I suppose if you say it really is impossible for any DVD writer to physically crack discs then I’ll take your word for it. And that’s the main thing I needed to know, as that’s what I fear most.

No offense to the OP, but what is the sense of worrying about it. You’ll never really know until you replace the MB and try it, so why worry about something you have no control over. The worst case scenario is it’s damaged, but you can get great drives for $30 these days, so it’s not worth the time worrying about it.

$30? That sounds nice as it’s only about 22 euro, but I live in rip off Ireland where I can expect to pay no less than 35-40 euro ($50) for a mid range drive. The S202J cost me around 35 euro I believe…

So yeah, that would be my last resort if I can help it.

Thank you both of you for your time and advice. Fingers crossed for a problem free build/windows installation next week!!


#7

Hi,[QUOTE=Drisc;2503107]
$30? That sounds nice as it’s only about 22 euro, but I live in rip off Ireland where I can expect to pay no less than 35-40 euro ($50) for a mid range drive. The S202J cost me around 35 euro I believe.[/QUOTE]Well, I can buy a drive (bulk, bare) for less than 20 Euro plus shipping, but I can also buy the same model (retail version) for 40 Euro locally.
That said, Ireland is no more rip off than Germany :slight_smile:

Michael


#8

I guess we have it pretty good in the USA. You can usually get a Sony Optiarc or any top brand here for around $25, no tax, free shipping at Newegg. I built my whole computer on Newegg parts.:iagree: