Hardware acceleration for 1080p material, is it needed or not?

vbimport

#1

I would like to know if hardware acceleration is needed/recommended for 1080p material. I ve read several post where HW acc. is discussed and is truly recommended for 1080i based material. However, I only watch 1080p content so is HW acc. really needed or even does have effect on the PQ or CPU reduction?

I m using a Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 2,67GHz 4Mb CPU and have a 7600GS PCI-e card which has HW acc. support.


#2

[QUOTE=THX-UltraII;2112887]I would like to know if hardware acceleration is needed/recommended for 1080p material. I ve read several post where HW acc. is discussed and is truly recommended for 1080i based material. However, I only watch 1080p content so is HW acc. really needed or even does have effect on the PQ or CPU reduction?

I m using a Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 2,67GHz 4Mb CPU and have a 7600GS PCI-e card which has HW acc. support.[/QUOTE]

Only the 8600 GTS and the HD 2600 are real contenders when it comes to accelerated H.264/VC-1 decoding - it was dissapointing to find that both top of the range cards from NVIDIA and ATI only has previous generation HD acceleration. This is one of the reasons I’ve put off buying a new computer until January, because the hardware is just not here yet for efficient HD decoding and also great gaming performance. Both H.264 and VC-1 will be really important for Blu-ray/HD DVD, as it looks like Blu-ray will be heading towards H.264, and HD DVD staying with VC-1.

this is a quote when I asked over a year ago abut HD playback from a
HTPC’s(home theater personal computers)

with your dual core, cpu will not be an issue, but that video chipset and the software codecs will be the limiting factors

I would think hardware acceleration would be mandatory


#3

1080p has twice as many Frames per second as 1080i.
So by logic, if 1080i requires HW acceleration, You would expect 1080p also requires it.

Try replacing your Video Card Driver with a standard VESA (non-hard ware accelerated) driver & play HD content.

If you’re lucky, you might get a couple of frames a second :wink:
And the audio will skip … hurray!


#4

[QUOTE=debro;2114569]1080p has twice as many Frames per second as 1080i.
So by logic, if 1080i requires HW acceleration, You would expect 1080p also requires it.

Try replacing your Video Card Driver with a standard VESA (non-hard ware accelerated) driver & play HD content.

If you’re lucky, you might get a couple of frames a second :wink:
And the audio will skip … hurray![/QUOTE]

My experience with a 1080p trailer and and ati 9600xt? and singlecore amd64 with full hardware accel and latest drivers and optimized computer was more like watching a slide show that stuttered/stalled


#5

1080p (most clips) works fine with that CPU and the video card will not be a limiting factor…
DaChew, read up… your 9600XT video card have no hardware acceleration at all for HD material except MPEG-2.
//Danne


#6

exactly and the 7600GS likewise

btw mpeg2 is not HD, it’s SD


#7

While your cpu is fast enough to play most HD, a video card will off load most of the work from the cpu if you use playback software that supports full hardware acceleration (only a few do so far as I know). Look for ati cards with uvd (unified video decoder chip) or uvd2, or look into nvidia and pure video. Personally I prefer ati as it fully hardware decodes h.264 and vc-1 (nvidia cards do not fully process vc-1), at least that was the way it was last I researched it with the 2000 series and the 8000 series. Also, higher cards do not necessarily have it (2600’s do, 2900’s dont, most 8600’s do, 8800’s don’t).


#8

[quote=DaChew;2114708]exactly and the 7600GS likewise

btw mpeg2 is not HD, it’s SD[/quote]

Not entirely true DaChew. Mpeg2 can be used in HD video. Many Blu Ray movies are made with mpeg2 encoding…just at higher resolution than you see in regular dvds. As an example: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1033580

If you look through the list of reviewed movies at avsforums you’ll find a fair number of Blu Ray movies using mpeg2, many with excellent video quality ratings.


#9

Someone correct me if I am wrong, but if you are a tv junkie like I am, and have your htpc loaded with shows, then it would come into play there as atsc used in US HD tv broadcasts is mpeg2.


#10

Kingdom of Heaven: Director’s Cut MPEG-2 24.03 3:09:33 41,902,393,344* 44,355,645,106 29.47 DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1

I stand corrected


#11

A 2 year long discussion

At the same bitrates yes is the answer to your question. Both AVC and VC-1 are newer video codecs that are inherently more efficient than MPEG-2. That is not to say that you can’t produce a phenomenal looking BD with MPEG-2. Black Hawk Down and Kingdom Of Heaven are both encoded in high bitrate MPEG-2 and they are great picture quality. Another large component in determining the final look of the Blu-ray is the quality of the master, which is a separate issue entirely

http://forum.blu-ray.com/showpost.php?p=1052919&postcount=142


#12

I generally find X264 to be too sharp … and generally unnatural … Mpeg-2 is fuzzy & comfortable …
Perhaps my eyes have just become accustomed to fuzzy SD after 25years :stuck_out_tongue: