Hard drive or DVD for long term backups?

vbimport

#1

I have roughly 300 DVDs which are stored in a CD/DVD case with what looks to be a felt pad or something. It’s black and very soft.

In my computer I have a single TB hard drive which I backup my DVDs to currently. I’m just wondering if DVD-R discs would be better for a long term solution over a SATA hard drive? Been having some airflow problems in my case and maybe that could be due to the hard drives in the way of the front 120mm fan. That’s a different topic though. Was mainly here to discuss which would be the best solution for backups.

Thanks.


#2

I’d try to make sure to have 2 backups. Usually i’d choose DVDR’s because they are cheaper than HD but for certain purposes i also use HD’s. What i have ripped so far from my personal music collection is both on HD and 2 DVDR’s (I have ripped about 50% and it’s about 400 GB in 320 kbps mp3 so far) :slight_smile:


#3

DVD is more safe than HDDs “if” they are the high quality TY/MCC media
I’ve had so much HDDs die on me that I’d NEVER trust them with my data


#4

They do sell that type of media where I buy most of my computer related stuff. So you’re basically saying that DVD is a better choice if you have a good media to choose from? CJ2 mentioned having both a hard drive (external?) and a DVD as an option, but mostly in favor of a DVD. If I was to store these DVDs, I’m currently using a 128 CD/DVD wallet book, but I’ve heard of other options like jewel cases or those paper sleeves.


#5

My backup HD’s are rarely on. A few hours weekly. I think it matters how they are used. Atm i have 4 external HD’s and never had an isuue with them but 2 of them are only storage - i almost never use them… :slight_smile:
(But still i like to have the DVDs just in case - one at home and one put away another place)


#6

DVD is safer. Stored properly, it will not die, providing it’s a good brand like Verbatim. Hard drives can have a simple little thing like a power outage or surge ruin everything if you’re unlucky. It happened to someone in my family. HDD went corrupt after a power outage. There’s no way in hell a power outage would affect a DVD lol.

You could even submerge dvds in water, drop them etc and they will still work. Try doing that to any hdd and it’s game over.

If you have excessive amounts of data, I would make a copy onto another hdd instead and store it somewhere safe, not connected to the power, then once blu ray is cheap and reliable enough, you can burn a dozen or so of them and be done :stuck_out_tongue:


#7

[QUOTE=cd pirate;2060573]DVD is safer. Stored properly, [B]it will not die[/B], providing it’s a good brand like Verbatim. [/QUOTE]

LOL, so you’re saying they’ll live forever? I doubt that, and I have had some 5 year old DVD-R from Verbatim die on me recently, so there’s always a chance of bad batches, which as a normal user one cannot recognise until it’s usually too late.

Hard drives can have a simple little thing like a power outage or surge ruin everything if you’re unlucky. It happened to someone in my family. HDD went corrupt after a power outage. There’s no way in hell a power outage would affect a DVD lol.

That HD got corrupted because it was writing at the time of the power problem. Imagine what would happen if you were writing a DVDR at the time? Right… I advise a cheap home UPS, filters out surges and keeps your PC afloat long enough for a proper shutdown. Costs very little these days.

You could even submerge dvds in water, drop them etc and they will still work. Try doing that to any hdd and it’s game over.

I am positively [B]shocked[/B] at what you propose I do to my precious DVDRs :bigsmile:

If you have excessive amounts of data, I would make a copy onto another hdd instead and store it somewhere safe, not connected to the power, then once blu ray is cheap and reliable enough, you can burn a dozen or so of them and be done :stuck_out_tongue:

Agreed, though the reliablity of BR remains to be seen. They’re also planning to change to organic dyes, meaning compatibility issues with current hardware… it will be a long time until BR becomes a stable and affordable format, by then it will be too small in capacity if you ask me.

Since I can no longer keep up with DVDRs, there’s too much data to store, I’m going the HD route. I’ll use external HDs, one to use (but not continuously attached), and one mirrored backup HD. Costwise it is initially more expensive than DVDR but it’s also much more convenient (smaller size and much less storage space needed, much faster, can be rewritten which saves costs etc).

Now I just need a software that will help keep the backup HD exactly mirroring the original and I’m all set :slight_smile:

Moomin


#8

[QUOTE=Moomin;2060691]

Now I just need a software that will help keep the backup HD exactly mirroring the original and I’m all set :slight_smile:

Moomin[/QUOTE]

You (and I) need something like this
http://www.buffalotech.com/technology/standards/raid/
http://svp.co.uk/product/edgestore_nas400_4_minus_bay_network_attached_storage_44049


#9

Well I didn’t mean forever, don’t remember using the word “forever” in the sentence. But they should last more than 5 years. The only discs to ever die on me were of Ritek brand.

That HD got corrupted because it was writing at the time of the power problem. Imagine what would happen if you were writing a DVDR at the time? Right… I advise a cheap home UPS, filters out surges and keeps your PC afloat long enough for a proper shutdown. Costs very little these days.

Lol, who cares if you were writing at the time out a power outage? Throw the disc away and start another burn. Can’t say the same for all the precious hard drive data unless you have another copy of all the data on another HDD.

Agreed, though the reliablity of BR remains to be seen. They’re also planning to change to organic dyes, meaning compatibility issues with current hardware… it will be a long time until BR becomes a stable and affordable format, by then it will be too small in capacity if you ask me.

Since I can no longer keep up with DVDRs, there’s too much data to store, I’m going the HD route. I’ll use external HDs, one to use (but not continuously attached), and one mirrored backup HD. Costwise it is initially more expensive than DVDR but it’s also much more convenient (smaller size and much less storage space needed, much faster, can be rewritten which saves costs etc).

Now I just need a software that will help keep the backup HD exactly mirroring the original and I’m all set :slight_smile:

Moomin

Well BR media may not be reliable yet, thus the whole part of my sentence stating we should wait until it’s cheap and reliable enough. It honestly wouldn’t take too long to get reasonable pricing. At the moment a 50 spindle of DVDs might cost 10 bucks if you can get really cheap but decent media on a bargain sale. That’s a bit over 200GB. Now even if you paid 50 bucks for 25 BR discs, you’d have over 1TB. Fuel economy is better for BR media even if it costs $2 per disc. By then we’d have maybe 2TB HDDs but buying 50 BR for 100 bucks would get you better GB mileage than a 2TB HDD would.

Let us remember this thread and see who is right in a couple years :bigsmile:


#10

HDD’s to me is much safer. Externals only need to be “on” to tranfer files, otherwise I have 2 backups of all my backup HDD’s in RAID.


#11

3 sets of DVD media (two sets on TY and MCC media, the other set on whatever I have lying around)…that’s worked for me for the last 4 years or so.


#12

[QUOTE=Arachne;2061176]3 sets of DVD media (two sets on TY and MCC media, the other set on whatever I have lying around)…that’s worked for me for the last 4 years or so.[/QUOTE]

It is nice to see you today, hope all is well with the stuff…Fluff! :bigsmile:

RAID configuration has always been safer then the software back up to me since the second drive is a mirror image of the first!


#13

[QUOTE=CJ2;2060719]You (and I) need something like this
http://www.buffalotech.com/technology/standards/raid/
http://svp.co.uk/product/edgestore_nas400_4_minus_bay_network_attached_storage_44049[/QUOTE]

Too expensive and limited expandability. I’m also in need of transportability, so what I want to do is take one drive with me when the need arises, and keep the backup drive safely at home.

So not really a RAID system, but an automated backup system that keeps pairs of drives always in sync.

Also, RAID does not equal backup, it’s geared towards availability, not storage of data.

Moomin


#14

[QUOTE=Moomin;2061282]
Also, RAID does not equal backup, it’s geared towards availability, not storage of data.

Moomin[/QUOTE]

RAID is to ensure you never lose data. If one drive goes down there’s always a replacement disc ready. All you have to do is insert a fresh drive before the next dies.
The professionals i know (maintainence/establishing of corporate networks or plain programmers) use RAID systems both at home and at work (obviously) :slight_smile:


#15

[QUOTE=CJ2;2061289]RAID is to ensure you never lose data. If one drive goes down there’s always a replacement disc ready. All you have to do is insert a fresh drive before the next dies.
The professionals i know (maintainence/establishing of corporate networks or plain programmers) use RAID systems both at home and at work (obviously) :)[/QUOTE]

But they don’t use it as backup, or they’re no professionals. They will make sure to have a backup solution for their RAID system handy, usually something like LTO tape, since the pros have that kind of money handy.

Once a drive fails, the new drive inserted, the RAID must be rebuilt. If during this long process another drive fails (which does happen, always at the least convient moment, trust me, believe in the Law of Allmighty Murphy :bigsmile:) the RAID is borked, and you’ll be very happy there’s a backup.

RAID is to make sure that data is available at all time. It’s redundancy is created for that purpose, not as a backup system, or no-one would still be buying those expensive LTO tape drives and media, and go through the hassle of making backups every day :wink:

Moomin


#16

I think we have established that RAID is not for you. Partly because it’s too expensive and partly because it’s not professional enough :slight_smile:


#17

[QUOTE=CJ2;2061346]I think we have established that RAID is not for you. Partly because it’s too expensive and partly because it’s not professional enough :)[/QUOTE]

Go ahead, make fun of me :slight_smile: but you won’t be laughing when your RAID fails irrecoverably, as I’ve seen them pass by here often enough. :bigsmile:

Moomin


#18

RAID haters! :bigsmile:


#19

The original poster wants to know about data [I]backup[/I] solutions, not data [I]availability[/I] solutions like RAID, so could we please get back on topic? Thanks.


#20

Indeed. Does anyone know a good backup software? I looked at ViceVersa and some free alternatives, but they just keep 2 devices in sync, I need 3 (the original HD, and 2 backup drives. The original will be cleared once backupped to 2 drives)

Moomin