Hard drive damage?

vbimport

#1

Where there is a blue screen or system freeze and the computer has to be turned off manually, could there be damages to the data stored on hard drives?

Is there any way to know for sure if there has been damage? Like would programs not run at all or would the damages be “subtle”?


#2

[QUOTE=Goit;2003152]Where there is a blue screen or system freeze and the computer has to be turned off manually, could there be damages to the data stored on hard drives?[/quote] Yes. When the system was busy with a writing command on the harddisk, that file may be damaged.

Is there any way to know for sure if there has been damage? Like would programs not run at all or would the damages be “subtle”?
Yes. They call it CHKDSK and its standard in all Windows operating systems.


#3

Also could be to much paging file being used as RAM! You might need more physical RAM put into your system.


#4

Yes, there is a possibility you will have corrupt data. Different types of filing system recover from this in different ways.

Fat & Fat32 both ignore any error caused by a system crash, this is why scandisc sometimes finds those file0000.chk files, these are sections marked as in use but without a file name so they are recovered as “lost chains” and given a file name.

NTFS has a journal that is stored along with the file, this allows the system to “roll back” a failed write when a problem occurs by undoing the instructions stored in the journal. It will not save the data but it allows the system to work out what is needed and correct and what is an error. Its not fool proof as if the error / crash happens when writing to the journal then you get the same lost info. This is why CHKDSK is still needed and sometimes still runs on NTFS.


#5

[QUOTE=qwakrz;2003427]Yes, there is a possibility you will have corrupt data. Different types of filing system recover from this in different ways.

Fat & Fat32 both ignore any error caused by a system crash, this is why scandisc sometimes finds those file0000.chk files, these are sections marked as in use but without a file name so they are recovered as “lost chains” and given a file name.

NTFS has a journal that is stored along with the file, this allows the system to “roll back” a failed write when a problem occurs by undoing the instructions stored in the journal. It will not save the data but it allows the system to work out what is needed and correct and what is an error. Its not fool proof as if the error / crash happens when writing to the journal then you get the same lost info. This is why CHKDSK is still needed and sometimes still runs on NTFS.[/QUOTE]

Does win xp have chkdsk?

I was talking about over 200 gigs stored onto the drive, can all of them become bad, not just the file that you are writing to?

I’m talking music and video files, I have several hundred gigs on the drive, and I got a blue screen when not writing to the drive. I can’t really listen to/watch them all to make sure that they are still good.


#6

[QUOTE=THE C.;2003377]Also could be to much paging file being used as RAM! You might need more physical RAM put into your system.[/QUOTE]

I got enough ram.


#7

Yes, Win xp includes chkdsk, it automatic after a failure you describe.

All of your files wll not be damaged unless the drive is destroyed.

You should have some sort of diagnostic utility in your system, that you can use to check hardware. Look under programs -> PC Help & tools (or something similar).