Hands-down ultimate loooong-term recordable media (circular form!)?

vbimport

#1

Ok - hypothetical situation.
I want to archive something, and want it to be retrievable after say, 20 years or more. No, not likely, but play along with me. :smiley:

What I want to know - are there true “professional” recordable CDs or DVDs? You know, something a studio might use to make a master from?

Cost no object. $5-10 a CD, $10-20 a DVD even.

But it’s gotta be near bullet-proof. None of this hard plastic on the business side, and flimsy deposited “foil” on the other. Hard, HARD plastic on BOTH sides, and something that the kids aren’t likely to scratch dropping it on the floor.

I mean, (no I’m not, buuuuut…) say I were dying and I want to make pictures / video to leave my kids. In that case, most people wouldn’t care if a DVD cost $50 for 1 blank if they KNEW it was going to survive.

On a more practical level, SOMETIMES I really want to keep something long-term. Family photos and such. And the crap at CompUSUCKS and WorstBuy just isn’t cutting it, even the crap labeled “photo archive” and “professional black” or whatever. :Z Even the Taiyo Yudens after a couple years the top layer is a bit delicate. But silver CDs, pressed at the factory, last FOR-EVER. I have a couple CDs that were released just after the first home CD players came out, and they are STILL in good condition. Why aren’t there any recordables that are like that?

Thanks all!
-keith


#2

there aren’t any recordables like that cuz they weren’t pressed in a factory. if u haven’t already noticed, the bottom of a recordable disc is far different from the bottom of a pressed disc. the dye on the bottom of a recordable disc is subject to chemical/physical changes that pressed discs aren’t.


#3

The Maxell CDR-Pro discs, made by TY are probably the best consumer option for durable CDR’s. There’s one or 2 others that have recently marketed “bullet-proof” CDR’s, but none have hit the shelves.


#4

Yeah, I know the dye itself is different from / less durable than a factory-pressed silver CD, but my point was in asking about a recorable CD that had a surface durability comparable to a silver CD.

Take a needle and lightly drag it on a TY - the silvery top layer flakes off, taking the recordable layer with it. On a factory CD, that top layer has been coated with the same plastic as the bottom layer, and survives minor scratches that would destroy a recordable. Why are no recordables made that way?

And as far as stability of the recording layer itself, wouldn’t CD-RW or DVD-RW be the most stable?

I’ll have to check the Maxell’s. (ack I can’t believe I just typed that!)
-keith


#5

far as stability of the recording layer itself, wouldn’t CD-RW or DVD-RW be the most stable

Considering that the dye is designed to change, the answer has to be no, they are less stable. Experience has born this out. We don’t know much about DVDRW yet.


#6

DVD-media is more scratch resistance since the Dye is in the middle of two plastic plates glued together.

And of course I recommend Taiyo Yuden as the best DVDR discs as well :wink:


#7

Originally posted by rdgrimes
We don’t know much about DVDRW yet.

dvd-ram also…?

I am looking for the answer to this same question…and no, I’m not dying…:slight_smile:


#8

As I understand DVD-RAM, the format is extremely fault-tolerant with redundant error correction. So I’m sure that DVD-RAM would win the longevity war easily.


#9

You guys need to go through this document on longevity and care of optical disks.

http://www.itl.nist.gov/div895/carefordisc/CDandDVDCareandHandlingGuide.pdf

Heat especially degrades RW and Ram disks–faster than the dye in -R disks.


#10

If you can find them, TDK “Armor” DVD-R are supposed to be absolutely scratch-resistant.


#11

Originally posted by Fallen
If you can find them, TDK “Armor” DVD-R are supposed to be absolutely scratch-resistant.

I have seen them during a demonstration and they allowed me to sratch them with steelwool and stamp on them. They survived this with ease.


#12

If I were you I’d back up 10 copies of each thing that was important, and have them stored in different places. That way if one is destroyed you will always have a backup somewhere. That’s how I’d handle such a situation. :slight_smile: