Guide for combining DVD videos into a Blu-ray

vbimport

#1

Blu-ray is becoming a more accepted format these days, but many people still have more DVDs than Blu-ray. From time to time, we get requests for help on making compilations of DVD-Video to put on a Blu-ray disc. This guide is intended to show you how to do this.

Full resolution DVD-Video is, by definition, within the specifications set out for Blu-ray. This does not mean that putting it on a Blu-ray disc magically transforms the DVD into high definition. It simply means the Blu-ray standard can accept many different resolutions and types of audio and video, and most anything that is already in DVD-Video format is automatically compliant to the standard definition sections of the Blu-ray standard. There are exceptions of course, as DVD-Video also has some variations in resolution and can have MPEG-1 in certain instances, but commercially made DVDs will either be 720 x 480 or 720 x 576 resolution, with MPEG-2 video and compliant audio.

So, what does that wordy paragraph actually mean? Simply put, it means that you almost never have to re-encode DVD-Video or lose any picture quality when converting to Blu-ray, especially when working with commercially made DVDs.

The problems inherent to this process are centered around making a working menu to select each video in the compilation. There are several different ways of approaching the problem, and there is one program that can do all of the steps by itself. It is called MultiAVCHD, and it is free to download and use. Unfortunately, the output from MultiAVCHD is not universally accepted by Blu-ray players or media player programs in computers. But for most people, MultiAVCHD does a fine job. You would simply have to test its output in your players.

I am going to outline a different approach, using some other free programs. They are AVStoDVD, DVD2BD Express, Vob2MPG and possibly PgcDemux. I say possibly, because using PgcDemux is optional, and only necessary if you need subtitles.


#2

We will be starting with several DVD videos that have already been decrypted and ripped to the hard drive. Since you will lose the original menus and extras, you need only rip the main movie, and make sure not to apply any compression to it when ripping. Our output target size will be a 25GB blank Blu-ray disc.

For anyone familiar with AVStoDVD, you may be wondering why I have chosen it as one of the programs for this guide. The answer is simple. AVStoDVD can accept DVD-Video as input and pass the audio and video through without re-encoding them as long as they will fit your output size. Normally in AVStoDVD, you would choose to output to a DVD-5 or DVD-9, but for this project, we will use the Custom output and set the size to 23500MB.

So AVStoDVD is useful because it can pass the video and audio streams through untouched, it can be set to a custom output size, and equally importantly, it can make a menu to select each video.

If you need a guide to help setup AVStoDVD, please look at this thread: http://club.myce.com/f32/avstodvd-guide-331620/

We will now prepare the ripped DVDs by using Vob2MPG.


#3

Many might say that using Vob2MPG is an unnecessary step, since AVStoDVD can import DVD-Video and index it by itself, but I have always had better results converting to an MPEG-2 file with Vob2MPG. If you wish to bypass this step and import the DVDs directly into AVStoDVD that is your prerogative, but I won’t guarantee that AVStoDVD will work correctly when making an over sized DVD this way.

By the way, there is a commercial version of Vob2MPG, but the free one works just fine for this process. And moving the video and audio out of the vob containers into an MPEG-2 file in no way degrades the quality of the picture.

Here is a picture of Vob2MPG in action. You select the Video_TS.IFO file found inside the Video_TS folder of your DVD as input. It takes about 90 seconds to process the video.

By using Vob2MPG, you’ll be taking up a lot more room on your hard drive while making this video, but as I said before, I find it more consistent than using AVStoDVD to index and import the video.



#4

Vob2MPG will give you an MPEG-2 file as output.

If you need subtitles, then you will need another tool at this point. I would suggest PgcDemux. Use the Video_TS_01_0.IFO file found in the Video_TS folder of your DVD (note that this is a different IFO file from the one used in Vob2Mpeg). You will see a number of options in PgcDemux, but you really only want to put a check mark next to the subtitle line.

Once you have the subtitles extracted, rename the file to match the MPEG-2 file you got from Vob2Mpeg.

Now we move on to AVStoDVD.

Here is the screenshot of AVStoDVD where I reset the output size to 23500MB:

To do this click on DVD Size–>Custom Size, set the output to the indicated size for a Blu-ray single layer disc then click OK.




#5

Now I have all four movies in MPEG-2 format, and I have the subtitles for each one.

I have imported them into AVStoDVD using the green [B]+[/B] sign on the right side of the main window of AVStoDVD. To import the subtitle for each movie, you must right click on the movie within the AVStoDVD window, which brings up a pop-up list of options, one of which is Subtitles.

I have also made a title for the new DVD I am creating.

Here is a screenshot:



#6

One of the main reasons for using AVStoDVD is to make a menu. So that is the next step.

Click on DVD Menu in AVStoDVD, then click Run Editor.
Adjust the menu to your satisfaction. If you need instructions on this, refer to the guide for AVStoDVD that I linked earlier.

Here is what the menu looks like at this point in the process:



#7

Close the menu editor window to save your settings, and you will be ready to compile the DVD. Set an output folder for your new DVD and click on Start. You might get an error message complaining about video duration, but just click on Yes if this shows up. AVStoDVD will continue by default after a minute delay anyway.

This process took about 17 minutes on my computer, but that will vary according to the speed of your machine and size of your particular project.

The first thing you should do when it is finished is check the DVD playback. If it is ok, we are ready for the next step, which is to use DVD2BD Express to make the Blu-ray video.

This is the main window of DVD2BD Express, with the IFO file from our new DVD used as input and a destination folder selected:

Click Start and let it do the work.



#8

Twenty five minutes later, and the Blu-ray is done. You’ll find it in a folder called Muxed, within the output folder that you designated.

Test playback, and you should be set. One unfortunate casualty of conversion to Blu-ray is the loss of chapter points, so you won’t be able to navigate in large steps through the new video. But you can use fast forward or reverse once you start playing one of the titles in the Blu-ray. The menu will still be intact and working properly.

If you want to burn to a blank Blu-ray disc, I suggest using ImgBurn and the UDF 2.5 file system. Of course, ImgBurn will warn you if you have something set incorrectly for burning Blu-ray video, so if you get such a warning, let it change the settings for you.


#9

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2681048]Close the menu editor window to save your settings, and you will be ready to compile the DVD. Set an output folder for your new DVD and click on Start. You might get an error message complaining about video duration, but just click on Yes if this shows up. AVStoDVD will continue by default after a minute delay anyway.

This process took about 17 minutes on my computer, but that will vary according to the speed of your machine and size of your particular project.

The first thing you should do when it is finished is check the DVD playback. If it is ok, we are ready for the next step, which is to use DVD2BD Express to make the Blu-ray video.

This is the main window of DVD2BD Express, with the IFO file from our new DVD used as input and a destination folder selected:

Click Start and let it do the work.[/QUOTE]
great guide:)


#10

thanks for posting the guide it’s very thorough


#11

I got some feedback on this process from a member over at Videohelp.com. He was getting slight hesitations in playback in his blu ray output, and it turned out it was the chapter points inserted into the oversized dvd made by AVStoDVD. Though the chapter points were not retained by DVD2BD Express, they still seem to exist in some form, and cause this slight glitch.

The solution is to make the chapter points occur at very large intervals…basically doing away with them. In Preferences in AVStoDVD, click on the Authoring/Burning tab. Then set the chapter interval rate to 999 minutes. This will eliminate this problem in playback.