Google reveals unpatched vulnerability in Windows 7 and Windows 10


#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Google reveals unpatched vulnerability in Windows 7 and Windows 10[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2015/05/myce-microsoft-Logo-2-95x75.png[/newsimage]

A Google security researcher has revealed a vulnerability in Windows for which Microsoft has not released a patch yet. The issue allows attackers to steal sensitive data (such as private userdata) from the system’s memory.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/google-reveals-unpatched-vulnerability-windows-7-windows-10-81472/](http://www.myce.com/news/google-reveals-unpatched-vulnerability-windows-7-windows-10-81472/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Microsoft’s efforts to ram Windows 10 into everyone’s computers made them appear as the money-hungry demanding “overlord” of technology. Now, leaving computers unpatched and vulnerable makes Microsoft seems either incompetent or unconcerned with the welfare of their customers. Right about now would be the perfect time for a Microsoft competitor to make their play!


#3

The right time would be at the height of Microsoft force feeding Windows 10 on non-suspecting Windows 7/8 customers… Sadly, there really is no worthy opponent.

OS-X - Nope, it would mean jumping into the fire, proprietary hardware linked to software, store regime, low security (sorry iSheeps, it is correct) and more.

Linux - Too many forks (in the road) for that to happen. Linux is actually Linux’ worst enemy. If they start to unify and work together on one to three different blends it would go faster, but Linux seems to have to go through natural evolution and currently there are more versions than ever. In other words, it may never become a real contender, sadly.

Linux has been my hope for years, ever since Windows XP when it became clear Microsoft had an effective monopoly. Linux is in server rooms all over the world, but for client operating systems, it is an esoteric format still.


#4

[QUOTE=Xercus;2788529]The right time would be at the height of Microsoft force feeding Windows 10 on non-suspecting Windows 7/8 customers… Sadly, there really is no worthy opponent.

OS-X - Nope, it would mean jumping into the fire, proprietary hardware linked to software, store regime, low security (sorry iSheeps, it is correct) and more.

Linux - Too many forks (in the road) for that to happen. Linux is actually Linux’ worst enemy. If they start to unify and work together on one to three different blends it would go faster, but Linux seems to have to go through natural evolution and currently there are more versions than ever. In other words, it may never become a real contender, sadly.

Linux has been my hope for years, ever since Windows XP when it became clear Microsoft had an effective monopoly. Linux is in server rooms all over the world, but for client operating systems, it is an esoteric format still.[/QUOTE]

IMHO, all GNU/Linux needs to become a major commercial competitor to Windows is for on distro to get a huge amount of marketing money. If Debian, for example, were advertised on TV as often as Geico Insurance, Microsoft could find itself in real trouble. The fact that there are “too many” distros (in the opinions of people who are most definitely not me) wouldn’t matter: Debian would be the one people hear about, so that’s the direction they would gravitate towards. Lesser-known distros would continue to exist, but users who don’t know what to choose would choose Debian, and developers would prioritize Debian support.

Of course having GNU/Linux pre-installed on as many computers as possible would go a long way as well. I do believe that’s what made Windows so popular in the first place: toward the end of the DOS days, Microsoft went out of it’s way to have Windows 3.x pre-installed on as many computers as possible.


#5

“The fact that there are “too many” distros (in the opinions of people who are most definitely not me) wouldn’t matter”

I’d suggest we repeat this on topic in another thread instead of burying it here as it is interesting, but for the record:
I say that based on the standpoint of the common Windows user. We both know there are a few grandfather distros from which most new derive, but if you look at it from a user with no or little prior Linux knowledge, the number of distros will soon become overwhelming and so they will likely hide behind their Windows computers again without making the switch… Which is really sad.
Sure, the users are where the programmers are, but it works both ways. Programmers are likely to flock where the users are just as you indicate :slight_smile: