Goodbye Concorde

The thread title says it all really.
Concorde used to fly in from New York into London directly over my house allways around the same time of 21:15
Concorde was probably the only plane that everybody would allways look up to. Everybody knows its Concorde, you don’t have to see it to know its Concorde.
It seems to me that we have taken a step back in time without Concorde in the skies now.
A sad day indeed.

Heh…I remember seeing the Concorde fly into Reno, Nevada (I was born and lived there for 5 years), and I vaguely remember it.

Actually, another airplane company funded concord to aid them with that lawsuit after their last horrific accident. They do still fly, but may have changed routine or course and may have less flights going currently. They are probably slowly rebuilding the company.

Originally posted by xtacydima
They do still fly,
Not Concorde.
Im talking about the delta shaped plane that carried 100 people at Mach 2 accross the atlantic in 3 hours. Not sure what one you mean.

With sadness I watched on television the last flight take off yesterday from JFK at around 7:40 A.M. EDT. Just sixteen were manufactured, two prototypes and fourteen flew commercially with the first commercial flight in January 1976.

For those who don’t know what Concorde is :bigsmile:

PS - Concorde is the big white one at the front of the formation.

Nice pic Bulk! :slight_smile:

I hope that the retirement of the Concorde is a good reason to do research for highspeed commercial flights and planes in the future…

Originally posted by Dee-ehn
I hope that the retirement of the Concorde is a good reason to do research for highspeed commercial flights and planes in the future…
Yeah I hope so too.
It was tried before by Boeing to make a better supersonic plane, but they didnt make it off the ground. Technology has advanced since then but still there is nothing anywhere near Concorde.

It is a shame. If anyone reads New Scientist you might have seen an article about development of supersonic planes without loud sonic booms. They’ve already carried out tests using a modified miliary jet which had a bolt-on design and it worked really well. They just need more $$.

I reckon the sub-orbital spaceplane is the way forward - London to Synday in 2-3 hours.

I feel the need…the need for speed!

Originally posted by DrK
I reckon the sub-orbital spaceplane is the way forward - London to Synday in 2-3 hours.
Probably right.
However, a lot of work needs to be done just to ensure its safe for special space craft to fly in and out of space let alone design an airplane which can do it.
How do they stop a sonic boom?

This is the article from 27 sept:

Curvy shape is key to silencing sonic booms

AS TICKETS for Concorde’s final flight go on sale this week, an American aerospace company has demonstrated a way to modify a supersonic jet to dramatically reduce its sonic boom. The work could pave the way for a new generation of business jets quiet enough to fly at supersonic speed over populated areas.

Sonic booms are one of the biggest drawbacks of supersonic flight. They are the thunderclaps caused when shock waves created at the nose and tail of an aircraft meet as they travel to the ground. Where the shock waves overlap they reinforce each other, creating the boom. Concorde’s boom is so loud that the plane is forbidden from flying at supersonic speeds over land.

In the 1970s, Richard Seebass and Albert George at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, came up with a straightforward way to counter the problem. They reasoned that a shock wave would be weaker if it were spread out over a larger area.

This could be achieved by replacing a plane’s sharp nose with a blunter shape and redesigning parts of the wings, for example where the base of the wing meets the fuselage, so that the angles between surfaces do not change so abruptly. The idea was to force the shock waves to fan out more rapidly as they move away from these curves, spreading out their energy. Years of computer modelling and wind tunnel tests have validated the concept, but it had never been tried in flight.

Now the American aerospace company Northrop Grumman has tested the idea with a modified F-5E jet fighter at Edwards Air Force Base in California. “In this business, you don’t know what you think you know until you fly it,” says Charles Broccadoro, the test programme’s manager. The team replaced the aircraft’s ordinary cone-like nose with a bulging design reminiscent of a pelican’s throat. The first results matched the computer models so well it was breathtaking, says Broccadoro.

Ed Haering, a physicist at NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center and an expert on sonic booms, monitored the test flights of the F-5E with an array of microphones and pressure sensors on the ground and on chase planes. He says the intensity of the shock wave was reduced to about 38 pascals, less than half the force created by Concorde’s boom.

These tests were not intended to produce a boomless flight - that would require a much more drastic modification of the aircraft’s shape than could be accomplished with the bolted-on structure of aluminium panels used in these tests, referred to as a “glove” because of the perfect fit required. But he added that the work could form the basis of a prototype in which the boom could be reduced to 15 pascals. This may lead to a virtually boomless jet that produces merely a distant rumble.

Next month, the team hopes to fly the modified plane at higher speeds and see a more pronounced reduction in the shock wave. It will also test the plane for a variety of weather conditions and flight paths. And Haering hopes to use a photographic technique involving pinpoint alignment of the test plane, chase plane and the sun to provide a high-resolution image of the pressure waves.

He believes these tests will provide enough data to allow engineers to begin work on more advanced prototype.
David L. Chandler

Originally posted by BlackWolf
With sadness I watched on television the last flight take off yesterday from JFK at around 7:40 A.M. EDT

I saw the very last one take off from Heatrow London airport, while waiting for my flight. :slight_smile:

Those are the fastest planes in the sky right?? Commercial liner right?? Are there going out of business???

Originally posted by cloakdoa
Those are the fastest planes in the sky right?? Commercial liner right?? Are there going out of business???
It is the fastest ever passenger plane. It flies on the edge of space at 60000 feet (11 miles high), faster than the speed of a bullet from a rifle at 2 times the speed of sound. Each engine is able to provide 38,000lbs of thrust. The engines provide a quater of a million horsepower. It can take off in London and land in New York before the time it took off in London. Instead of losing a day flying and all the jet lag Concorde could reduce the travel time from over 8 hours to under 3 and half hours over the Atlantic.
Handicapped with a weight of 185,000 kilograms Concorde can accelerate from 0 to 360 Km/h in under 20 seconds.

Unfortunately, the last Concorde flight was on Friday. The fleet have now been retired. Air France had already retired its fleet a few months back.

Good riddance. Noisy ass piece of @$#@ ! :a

Originally posted by Bulk

For those who don’t know what Concorde is

PS - Concorde is the big white one at the front of the formation.
And what are the red ones then ? :confused: Do you have the same detailed explanation ? :smiley:

The red ones are her babies, Concordettes.:bigsmile:

Originally posted by biggles77

The red ones are her babies, Concordettes. :bigsmile:
Damn, they are the very image of their father. :eek:

Originally posted by BoSkin
And what are the red ones then ? :confused: Do you have the same detailed explanation ? :smiley:
Those would be the Red Arrows, the RAF aerobatic display team.
Red Arrows Site.
The pic was taken from the Queen’s golden jubilee when The Red Arrows flew with Concorde in thier Concorde formation over London.

Originally posted by Flying Dutchman
Good riddance. Noisy ass piece of @$#@ ! :a
Too bad the US didnt make a quieter version.
Oh yeah I forgot, they tried but they spent more money trying to get a plane off the ground then what the British and French government spent on building an entire fleet of 20 Concorde’s. Amazing that eh?