Good Quality? Slow down!

vbimport

#1

I’ve been using CloneDVD and AnyDVD since they first came out but I just discovered something that I had not tried before. This may have been brought up before, I just never read it.

When backing up a dual layer disc with 53% compression I found that slowing CloneDVD’s speed down to 1x makes a very acceptable copy. The color indicator is just starting in the yellow. It takes about 1 hour to complete but you can get a lot of stuff on the dvd and the copy is very good.

I had always run clonedvd flat out at maximum and made copies in 15-30 mins. The copy quality was good but I’ve always had a lot of pixalation, maybe from the media, though I use many types and brands. Slowing down to 1x reduces the pixalation almost completely with good copy quality even on 50%+ compressed titles.

Just my thoughts…


#2

I would not advise burning at such a slow speed. Some media will burn far worse than burning at it’s highest recommended speed. It all depends on your system specs and media used. It’s better to use quality media and you should not get pixelation.
Make sure your burners firmware is updated, use quality media only, and burn at the highest recommeded speed or slightly slower and you should have good copies.

Your statement
“It takes about 1 hour to complete but you can get a lot of stuff on the dvd and the copy is very good.”

You can get the same amount of “stuff” burning at 12x or 16X, speed has absoutely nothing to do with the amount of information you burn to the DVD.


#3

Agreed…Agreed…Agreed.


#4

Background:
My objective is the highest quality burn I can get. I really don’t care about speed. One has to be careful believing the hyped up spec’s of media and hardware manufacturers.
I respectfully disagree with the folks who suggest burning at maximum speeds. My experience in this area has guided me to select burn speeds mid-way in the range of what the media and burner supposedly can handle. I have been practicing this with cd media and dvd media for a long time with consistently reliable results.
For example, I tend to burn 8x media in my 16x burner at 4x. I would burn 16x media in my 16x burner at 8x. Using good quality media which works well in your particular burner is also very important.


#5

Just to clarify, in case you misread my contention, Highest recommended speed and maximum speed are two different things and I don’t believe in maximum speed, especially as increased burning speed shortens lifespan.

My BenQ, for example, allows me to burn TY 8X media at 16X. This is not the rated speed at all. As well, stated above, quite a lot of media will deliver worse burns at slower than rated speeds. I don’t really believe the original poster is getting 1X on his burns regardless of the settings, but I can get 1X on my Panasonic E50 and they are not as good as the rated speeds in any way. I have also seen plenty of 8X media that is worse at 4X, although some +R is a little better.

A general statement that slower burns are better is just not universally true.


#6

Rich 86,
I too usually burn at a slower speeds, such as 4x for 8x rated.
I have discovered though, it all depends on the media, some media (Maxell in my case) will in fact burn better at the 8x (highest recommended) then at 4x, One needs to experiment and find what media and burner combination works best then stick with it.
Personally, although my hacked firmware may permit a media to burn at a higher speed then recommended, I never do so, I always instruct my burning software to burn at the speed I dictate, I never choose maximum.