Good 21" / 20" monitor @ 1280x1024?

vbimport

#1

Is there such a thing as a decent LCD monitor in the 20" or 21" range with a native 1280x1024 (5:4) resolution ?

It’ll be used for gaming, so a good response time and general performance with no ghosting, etc would be required as well.

Please, no recommendations outside of the desired and specified characteristics.

Thank you! :slight_smile:


#2

As you noticed there isn’t a standardized LCD standard it’s all based on manufacture specs and test not something like consumer review. If you want more info you should check Consumer Reports or PCWorld on their reviews of LCD and from that decide what do you want your monitor to have and not have that fits your LCD monitor size. Also at the LCD size your looking at I don’t see it giving you anything bigger then 1680 x 1050 that I can find. If you want more I think your going to have to look at a bigger LCD size aka 23" at 1920 x 1080. How you came up with that 1280x1024 (5:4) resolution doesn’t seem to be that size I can find over in the state side here. I am assuming that is something of pal resolution.


#3

19" is as big as I can see for that resolution, NEC Display Solutions AS191-BK Black 19" 5ms LCD Monitor


#4

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2482241] How you came up with that 1280x1024 (5:4) resolution doesn’t seem to be that size I can find over in the state side here. I am assuming that is something of pal resolution.[/QUOTE]:disagree:
1280x1024 (5:4) was very widespread before the cheaper to produce widescreens hit the market. Nowadays they are nearly extinct.
If I remember correctly, this resolution was available with 17", 18" and 19" monitors. Larger screens mostly came with 1600x1200 (4x3) and are still available, targeted to professional users.

Michael


#5

For a moment there when I started reading the replies I thought I either had mistakenly posted in the wrong site, or that I was in the twilight zone :bigsmile:

Back when non-widescreen monitors were widespread, we wouldn’t have to think about what resolution they had, because by then people were using the superior CRT technology. 1280x1024 was simply a commonly preferred desktop resolution in 19" and 21" models, but since CRTs don’t suffer from such cheap tech traits as fixed pixels, people would simply use whatever resolution they needed or wanted, whenever they needed or wanted, for each and whatever program or game they needed or wanted. More civilized times, good old Ben would say.

I’m afraid that my 13-year-old 21" CRT is finally dying on me, and I don’t like the options the current market has to offer me. Maybe I’ll just end up getting a second hand CRT afterall.


#6

[QUOTE=Kweldood;2482343]For a moment there when I started reading the replies I thought I either had mistakenly posted in the wrong site, or that I was in the twilight zone :bigsmile:

Back when non-widescreen monitors were widespread, we wouldn’t have to think about what resolution they had, because by then people were using the superior CRT technology. 1280x1024 was simply a commonly preferred desktop resolution in 19" and 21" models, but since CRTs don’t suffer from such cheap tech traits as fixed pixels, people would simply use whatever resolution they needed or wanted, whenever they needed or wanted, for each and whatever program or game they needed or wanted. More civilized times, good old Ben would say.

I’m afraid that my 13-year-old 21" CRT is finally dying on me, and I don’t like the options the current market has to offer me. Maybe I’ll just end up getting a second hand CRT afterall.[/QUOTE]

Actually you should invest in LCD monitor as CRT is now not being made anymore or support anymore except second hand seller or used or some are still available but most if not all manufacture are going LCD or Plasma display now. I use a 20" widescreen to play my GPU intensive games and they work fine. As anything it’s not just your monitor but the GPU driving and sending signals that in the end makes the difference how it displays on the screen. So there are is the GPU component you have to also look at that affect screen quality and resolution as well. My setup is a GTX260OC with Acer 20" widescreen at the highest resolution and it plays fine with graphics intensive games. Not to mention the eye strain you get from the CRT technology as well as less power used.


#7

With high frequency CRT’s eye strain isn’t an issue, 85Hz and above. As great as CRT’s are when doing high resolution stuff the VGA cable suffers a little, and a high quality LCD with a DVI input might be sharper. But the high color gamut, zero ghosting, awesome gray scale, zero lag, etc… of the CRT is still king.

To invest in a quality LCD means spending ~$550US for a S-IPS panel.


#8

I’ve had a 21" CRT monitor for a long time, I finally went LCD when I was given a Viewsonic 19" LCD 4:3 monitor.
The text at the native res was so much sharper then my CRT I gave it away and decided to get a cheap 19" wide LCD for now.
The nice thing about the CRT was infinite black level, no gaming lag at all, and it could do just about any resolution and look great doing it, but it weighed a ton, sucked juice, and the text just wasn’t as sharp no matter what res I set it at though it was OK, just not raiser sharp.
LCDs black level sucks, though many newer ones are very good now, the picture is bad at anything but it’s native res, and some can have motion blur and lag in fast games, But at the proper settings text is so sharp and clean, they don’t weigh anything, and they use much less juice and tend to run cooler.
I find that I spend most of my time surfing and hitting my favorite forums so I spend a lot of time reading text so I decided to stick with LCD for now, I don’t game near as much as I used to either.
The best LCD monitors use IPS panels,or PVA, and some of the newest ones also have LED back lighting, hopefully with local dimming.
So you have to decide if you just can’t stand the bad side of LCD and want a old CRT or if you want the good parts of it and they outweigh the bad for you.
I’m sure you can buy very cheap, or find somebody that just wants to give away their old big CRT monitor if thats what you decide to do.
My Last one was a Iiyama pro flat tube monitor that originally sold for something like 1500 bucks and I paid 40 for it, and was later offered several Sony ones for free…


#9

Thats a good point Dartman. Some of the better CRT’s have built in focusing, on others you have to remove the back panel and there are a couple screws to mess with to adjust the focus. I remember years back some friends were going to through out a seemingly good CRT because the text blurred, I ripped that sucker open and even cut an access hole to get at the focus screws without having to pull the back off, zip zip zip good as new. Those friends were PhD students and I was getting my master’s at the time, and they looked at me like I was God :smiley: (for a brief moment anyway), then they turned around to play with their dust samples and slides of nano particles lol.


#10

I’ve repaired TV’s for years so I knew about that and even popped open the CRT one right after I got the first LCD but I couldn’t get it much sharper and it even had 2 focus pots like my newer HDTV in the front room has which I also tweaked as sharp as I could get it.
When the tube starts wearing out they tend to loose focus as well and I guess good luck finding another good tube to replace it with. I used to replace the tubes with other good used and sometimes new or rebuilt ones when I was really seriously working at it to make extra money.
With all the new digital sets and tuners nobody wants the old sets any more so I don’t bother much except for my own gear and family stuff.
I even have a old rebuilt Beltron CRT rejuvinater that saved many a set that had a flaky but restorable CRT in it.
I prefer CRT tech basically but LCD is pretty much taken over and I do like the Uber sharp text. My main TV out front is a 34" wide screen HD CRT Toshiba 34HFX84 that I’ll hang onto till a really decent plasma or something better comes along for a good price.
OLED was supposed to be the next killer display tech but the size and price kill it for most people right now.


#11

I still stand by my conviction the eye strain from the CRT didn’t my vision alot more then from a LCD I currently own now. I can turn and look back at my LCD and have no sudden squinting of my eyes cause of eye trying to adjust focus as from the LCD as I do with with the CRT. Plus having to move a 50lbs CRT 20" wasn’t the best use of the CRT itself and as well as the heat put out by a CRT was quiet alot to warm my room from just using it. So I decide on various factors as well as no one fix CRT anymore and fixing it would cost more then to purchase a LCD. I used to remember a high resolution CRT was more costly then a lower resolution CRT in my computing past so for a LCD of higher quality resolution to cost more now would seem all natural evolution process. So whether we want to admit it or not LCD or Plasma or OLED are here to stay and most likely to take over where CRT left off.