Giving DRU-510A Dual layer burning support?

Sorry if this has already been asked (i’m new), but is it possible to update the firmware on a Sony DRU-510A DVD-Burner, to give it the ability to burn dual-layer dvd’s. Can I just use the same firmware from a Sony Dual layer burner, I think it’s the DRU-700, or something like that. Thanks.

No, it is not possible.

how about giving it 8x dvd-r burning speeds.

Not possible and never will be.

Oh well, spose you can’t have everything, but it is possible with other dvd burners isn’t it?

Only some.
http://forum.rpc1.org/viewtopic.php?t=25780

And note that is said about the success rate in this thread.

What can be done with other burners has no effect whatsoever on what can be done with this burner.

Why are the two impossible ?

First off, higher writing speeds and DL support can only be added by the manufacturers themselves. In the case of NEC, they added this support by creating the 2510A firmware, which, in turn, was compatible with the 2500A drive. Likewise with LiteOn and BenQ and their crossflashable drives. So unless Sony creates a firmware for a drive that is physically compatible with the 510A, this will never happen. Only the drive manufacturers know enough about their drives and firmwares to be able to do such a thing. And to top if off, Sony’s 500A/510A drives are very well protected–so much so that not even something relatively simple (when compared to DL or high speeds) like region-freeing the firmware is possible.

Thanks for the lecture on drives and firmwares, that was very amusing :slight_smile:
The question was actually : do you know any hardware limitation (like chipsets,
OPUs, etc) why this drive would not be able to burn dual layer or 8x speed ?

Well, if you frame the question like that, then no, there is no known hardware limitation (not to say that there isn’t). But I suppose one could argue that all that is moot if you can’t even get a firmware on there, either because nobody wants to rewrite significant chunks of firmware without the necessary information (like having the source code would be nice) or because the encryption (done entirely on the drive itself) makes loading unofficial firmwares nearly impossible (for all practical intents and purposes).

Now if Sony decides that they want to officially add DL support, they could do so. But unless the head of their optical division goes insane ;), they probably won’t. So perhaps not absolutely 100% “impossible,” but “impossible” under reasonable circumstances.

On a side note, there are several firmware releases from Sony for the DRU-510A, the latest being 1.1a. Can somebody tell me exactly what benefit I will get from upgrading to the latest firmware. The Sony site is pretty vague in that it says it improves performace. I still have the original firmware and was thinking of upgrading.

Also would I need upgrade in order, i.e. 1.0c, then 1.0d then 1.0f and then 1.1a. Or could I just go straight to 1.1a?

Thanks in advance.

You should be able to go directly to the new version.

However, I am not sure what benefits would be offered. My guess would be improved media compatibility and support. Generally speaking, newer firmwares are usually better than older ones, but that might not always be the case. If you’re not sure, then it’s probably safest to follow the “if it ain’t broke…” rule–if your drive is working fine, then don’t mess with it and change the firmware only if you are having problems.

Thanks for a very fast response.

Spath, I think that you know it would be a waste of time to research the components of the drive and determine if there are technical limitations. You’ve been around long enough to understand that it just ain’t gonna happen. You asked the question and got the answer…

Sony has many different websites for Optical storage devices. Some have better information than others.

I think that the best English Sony website for DVD Burners is here: http://sony.storagesupport.com/dvdrw/firmware.htm

> Spath, I think that you know it would be a waste of time to research the
> components of the drive and determine if there are technical limitations.
> You’ve been around long enough to understand that it just ain’t gonna happen.

I see… does that mean that your friends never search/read the chipsets
datasheets of a drive before modifying its firmware ?

> You asked the question and got the answer…

I asked the question because for me ‘not possible and never will be’
suggests the knowledge of an insuperable obstacle, i.e. an hardware
limitation. It was not the case, point closed.

For most firmwares, only one thing is needed: the CPU type of the chipset so that it can be disassembled. Sometimes, more detailed specs are nice, but most of the time, it’s pointless because nobody in their right mind is going to go rewrite significant chunks of the firmware–nobody is going to mess with hundreds of thousands of lines of disassembly because it’d be a total waste of their time. Making patches here and there, bypassing functions here and there, changing data values here and there most of the time are things that generally do not need to involve any chipset limitations.

I asked the question because for me ‘not possible and never will be’ suggests the knowledge of an insuperable obstacle, i.e. an hardware limitation. It was not the case, point closed.

The “insuperable obstacle” is the firmware. To ignore the limitations of firmware modification and to consider only hardware in this equation is naive, IMHO.

What you think is needed, sufficient or pointless to modify in a firmware
depends on your knowledge of the complete system, and if you know nothing
about it then indeed everything will look very simple. RPC1 patches are very
basic and don’t require any specific knowledge, but pretending to add higher
speeds, new media or dual layer capabilities without looking at the contents
of your drive is playing with fire.

As I am sure you are well aware, “pretending” is indeed the right word because the higher speeds and whatnot are added by the manufacturer (and not by me or anyone else) in the form of firmware for another drive model (so it really is as simplistic as a RPC1 patch–just let the firmware of one drive work for another). And as I’m sure you are also well aware, checking to make sure that two drives have the same hardware specs before crossflashing one to the next is a relatively much simpler task (that does indeed get done) and doesn’t require obtaining full chipset specs. All that I was saying in my post is that in the context of most of the firmware stuff that gets done, knowing such information is overkill; it was not intended as a blanket statement about everything.

I also have the 510a and I just upgraded to the 1.1a firmware with no problems. I also downloaded Sony’s DSS (drive speed selector) which will allow you to optimize the drive speed and it cut the time required to read a full dvd in half.