German court forbids open-source download manager JDownloader 2

I just posted the article German court forbids open-source download manager JDownloader 2.

A German court has ruled that the open-source download manager JDownloader2 is forbidden.

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/german-court-forbids-open-source-download-manager-jdownloader-2-67551/](http://www.myce.com/news/german-court-forbids-open-source-download-manager-jdownloader-2-67551/)

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perhaps the developer ought to take the tv stations to court for not preventing the downloading of video with his software?
seriously, when is this crap gonna end? when are courts gonna wake up, smell the coffee and realise just how stupid the entertainment industries are making them look? surely receiving ‘back handers’ has to have a limit?

You know, I could easily get a video camera and record what ever I want with it. Perhaps, that should be illegal, too, along with the right to take still pictures, record sound, and take freaking notes on paper!

What’s next? not being allowed to look at copyrighted content without the distributors, by law, using brain-hacking technology to remove any memory of the content?

Just think, if they could do that, odds are pirates could use the same technology to reproduce contents before deletion, or possibly to undue deletion altogether.

As long as the industry remains stubborn, the fight may never end. :frowning:

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2690649]You know, I could easily get a video camera and record what ever I want with it. Perhaps, that should be illegal, too, along with the right to take still pictures, record sound, and take freaking notes on paper!

What’s next? not being allowed to look at copyrighted content without the distributors, by law, using brain-hacking technology to remove any memory of the content?[/QUOTE]
If they take you to that court in Hamburg (or another one in Munich), they could easily make such a judgement in both cases. Those courts are well-known for mostly ruling in favour of those who sue against copyright violations. That’s why copyright owners prefer suing other parties at one of these two courts.

The appeals court often withdraw these judgements and take a different direction. However not every case goes to the appeals court.

I think Liggy nailed it.
Anyone who fear such cases in Germany should google federalism… that is the actual answer for such cases and why they will remain like toothless tiger of paper. :smiley:

…to add: its not only a pity, its a shame…because of:

Several federal systems exist in Europe, such as in Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina and the European Union. [U]Germany and the EU offer the only examples in the world where members of the federal “upper houses” (the Bundesrat and the Council) are neither elected nor appointed but comprise delegates of the governments of their constituents.[/U]

taken from wikipedia