Fungus on CDs?

vbimport

#1

Hi!
All these thread-like stuffs that keeps growing on my CDs, had made me go nuts about it.


My Pocahontas CD


Zoomed-in


Enhanced

The scanned image is quite blurry, but the real thing is very visible with the naked eye. Almost all of my CDs starts to grow this fine thread-like things if i leave the CDs on the shelf for about 6 months. The funny thing is that it will only grow on the printed side and not the other side for reading. More specifically, it will only grow on the non-printed parts of the printed side. Thus, CDs with the entire surface printed are not affected.

If i leave the affected CDs long enough, these thread-like things seems to be able to flake the alumimun off bit by bit. Rendering EAC ripping quality of 100% impossible.

These thread-like things can be rubbed off with a dry cloth. But the momment I leave the disc alone for about 6 months, these things starts to come back.

Its driving me nuts! :a
What is this? Fugus? Filiform Corrosion? How can I stop this? I’m living in Singapore where tempreture and humidity is high. And I hope I do not need to resort to buying a large air-tight cabinet to keep all my CDs!
Thanks for reading, any help greatly appreciated!!!


#2

wow! that’s so weird! I was going to say it could just be dust, but from your description it sounds like something is up.

you don’t know any scientists do ya? The only way to tell for sure would be to get that stuff under a microscope and find out what the heck it is…

you could do a little experiment:

take 3 discs, one will be the control. leave one out in the open, seal another in an airtight container (leftover food container, something like that) and put it in the diest part of the house, and put another disc where it’s likely to get a lot of humidity (on a shelf in the bathroom or something like that) and track the progress to see what’s going on.

if the humid accumulates more of this stuff or accumulates it more quickly then it’s probably safe to say you’ve got some weird kind of fungus going on


#3

I know that you that need low humdity to preserve longevity. Low Temp as well.

Have a look at these links. They maybe a little old but give some interesting points

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/1402533.stm
http://listserv.muohio.edu/scripts/wa.exe?A2=ind0110d&L=archives&O=A&P=16731
http://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/index.php/id;461315701;fp;1024;fpid;3

Here is a screen shot of a fungus.

http://secure.idg.com.au/images/pcw/fungus_oct04.jpg

:cool: :cool:


#4

Yes, this is a fungus and I had the same problem whilst in Africa for a while. You may also have problems with cameras, where this stuff grows inside the housing on the lenses and cannot be cleaned off :(.

A simple idea which many of us did was to fit a single very low power lightbulb (~10 W) inside a cabinet and keep sensitive equipment and CDs in there. The heat from the bulb lowers the relative humidity locally and prevents the fungus from returning.


#5

doe sit damage the discs at all?

is it unique to CDs or can it happen to DVDs as well?

I can imagine it’s annoying and damaging to cameras (well at least in terms of distorting the picture from underneath the lens), but it it going to hurt the discs at all?