Fujifilm breakthrough makes low cost 15 TB discs possible - 1 TB in 2015

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Fujifilm breakthrough makes low cost 15 TB discs possible - 1 TB in 2015.

Fujifilm has announced that its has developed a new method for recording to optical discs that makes low cost high capacity data storage possible by 2015

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/fujifilm-breakthrough-makes-low-cost-15-tb-discs-possible-1-tb-in-2015-64781/](http://www.myce.com/news/fujifilm-breakthrough-makes-low-cost-15-tb-discs-possible-1-tb-in-2015-64781/)

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#2

I’ll wager that one of these discs will cost as much as a HDD of the same capacity.


#3

Hasn’t the market moved beyond optical discs at this point, except for media distribution on existing disc formats (CD, DVD, BD) ?

I doubt we’ll see any new optical discs formats succeed from now on.


#4

Let’s see, it takes about an hour to burn a 25 gig Single Layer BD Disk.
20 layers is going to take how long to burn?
A 20 layer disk is going to cost how much?
Still much faster and cheaper to buy 1 TB hard drives!
Regardless of capacity, optical has pretty much run it’s course.


#5

Some pro applications might like this for archiving and such. Completely useless for consumers.


#6

Put more lasers/heads in a drive to read/write faster?


#7

[QUOTE=olddancer;2663898]Let’s see, it takes about an hour to burn a 25 gig Single Layer BD Disk.
20 layers is going to take how long to burn?
A 20 layer disk is going to cost how much?
Still much faster and cheaper to buy 1 TB hard drives!
Regardless of capacity, optical has pretty much run it’s course.[/QUOTE]

About an hour for a 25GB disc? Hell no, not anymore.
At 14x, a 25GB disc will take 7 minutes to completely fill.
A more common burning speed right now is 8x and that will take 12 minutes to fill a 25GB disc.
The rewritable blu-ray discs are still stuck with low burning speeds of 2x and that takes 47 mins for a 25GB disc.
I do fear the burning times for these 20 layer discs though, unless they have also developed a rapid burning speed technology to compliment the huge capacity.


#8

Oh, I’m not worried about speed! Just wait until Windows is 50% faster!!

Whoosh! We’ll be burning these 15Tb disks in, oh, weeks! “Under a 1,000 hours!” and then we’ll see those speeds plummet to “Under 990 hours, if you’ll buy our slightly higher priced drive-!”


#9

After having a closer look at the article, my main concern would be stability and even the readability of the recorded marks. With every disc technology so far, the only thing the optical head had to do was accurately check whether or not it is reading a mark. With FujiFilm’s technology, the optical head would also need to determine the size of each mark to determine which one of 8 levels it is.

[QUOTE=FreqNasty_RiseS;2663943]The rewritable blu-ray discs are still stuck with low burning speeds of 2x and that takes 47 mins for a 25GB disc.[/QUOTE]
I fully agree. When I bought my Blu-ray writer, I also bought a BD-RE disc to try it out. The main thing I was interested in is the ability to format it like a USB flash drive, so I could incrementally add data. However, writing files took so long that I haven’t used a BD-RE disc since the week I bought it.

Apart from doing a test burn of Blu-ray video (to try in a set-top Blu-ray player), BD-RE is practically useless for storing other types of data. A 20-pack costs more than a 500GB USB3 HDD (for same storage capacity) and 25GB takes about 6 minutes to transfer for a typical USB3 2.5" HDD. Finally, data can be added intermittently without several minutes before the disc can be ejected.

It’ll be interesting to see what the burn time would be for a 15TB disc, assuming it becomes available. :slight_smile:


#10

[QUOTE=Seán;2664269]The main thing I was interested in is the ability to format it like a USB flash drive, so I could incrementally add data.[/QUOTE] USB drives are good for that purpose! :bigsmile:


#11

Indeed that’s what I do now. :slight_smile:


#12

My biggest concern is what will happen when that tiny dust molecule floating around lands on the disk. How many layers will it kill? Plus, if this new format is used for music or movie distribution (the latter, of course, being more likely), then people will be unable to use it because the MPAA hates us… :a

Still, slow or not, you have to admit… 15tb is pretty sweet. If they can make this a high-speed rewritable solution, I’ll be the first in line to get a burner! This could be the final solution for most to backup important files in case of h/w failer, system crash, ect.


#13

I agree with other posters, companies seling optical drives and media have been too arrogant in keeping the price for their wares quite high… if you compare with DVD, Blu Ray has ALREADY extended by at least 1 year the higher prices for even stand-alone video players. This slows adoption uptake rates and innovation.

The technology has yet to prove itself as a viable alternative, these are still concept optical media & drives which may never see the light of day in the consumer’s hands. This tech would have to compete with blu ray which is an established standard… and would have to kiss the ring of the MPAA first to get it’s blessing if it ever wanted access to video content distribution (legally). Knowing these hurdles are out there and the decline in the PC biz, might as well take it with a grain of salt that this has an 8% chance of making it… and 0% if the content industry is against you (meaning you’ll have to load it down with drm and other nasties).


#14

I don’t see how this is a revolution, first it was CD-R then DVD-R, and now we are on BD-R do we need a new bigger format, I say NO we don’t. The problem now is that BD-R is expensive, and as we moved along in technology the main problem now is not the capacity of the discs but stability, archival problems etc.

Now that BluRay players, burners etc are cheep enough, we now need to see way more reliable media, and cheap prices. Just like with DVD-R that has more or less taken over CD-R completely. Even though CDs and DVDs will be around for a lot longer, why try and develop new optical media when the older technology works fine. Sure BluRay was a nice step in order for HDTV to move forward and all that.

Optical media just don’t cut it compared to cheap harddrives, even HVD (Holographic Versatile Disc) hasn’t made any real progress, and unless we get optical media that can hold 150-400gb data in a single layer in order to move from bluray (1080p) to 4k movies etc, I don’t see optical media going forward in the future, any time soon.

I would argue that the most important thing for everyone out there is cheap, (also quality) high reliable BR-R media. Plus larger harddrives.