From 400 miniDV cassettes (1 hour-long) TO 400 DVDs

Hi Folks,

I have a big job to do, 8 weeks to do it:

I need to put 400 one-hour long MiniDV cassettes onto 400 DVDs.:eek:

All I have is a HP Pavillon laptop computer, a old mini DV camcorder which doesn’t seem to be able to dialogue with my Vista system (even though Sony tells me I don’t need a new driver for Vista), Premiere and MovieMagic editing softwares.

How would you proceed to do the job?

I am thinking of buying an external DVD burner (even though I already have one in my laptop), and a second hand miniDV camcorder (since the one I have doesn’t talk to the laptop).

But, Is there anyway I could bypass the camera-capture to computer - burn to DVD process? Like directly from Camera minidv to DVD burner?

thanking you all in advance for your help.:bigsmile:

If you buy/borrow a standalone DVD recorder (i.e. one that connects to your TV aerial etc.) with the right inputs, you should be able to record the movies in real-time. Not sure what sort of menu structure (if any) that standalone recorders produce, though.

Sláinte

midders

Hi all,

I am a TV director and filmmaker in Vancouver. I was given a big small job and that is why I am here. A client of mine is asking me to make 400 DVDs from 400 miniDV tapes. Yes, one minidv into one DVD, 400 times.

Some have to be in AVI format, because some users will want to edit from the files.
Most will only need to be transfered into mpeg on DVDs, for viewing only.

I don’t have SCSI equipment, only:

1 HP laptop comuter running on Vista Home premium, with 1 Gb of Ram.
1 external LG DVD burner
1 Seagate (FAT) with a lot of space to use, but with a maximum of 4 GB per transfer.

Doing the Mpeg transfers don’t cause any major problems.

Capturing one hour worth of AVI from a minidv player, and burning the resulting 13 GB of AVI onto a DVD as DATA is a problem.

I bought some Memorex (printable) DVD to run some tests. For starters, they only take about 4 GB of data. I need to put 13!

Do you know if I can put 13 GB of data (AVI files) onto a DVD?

Also, I need to run the capture program concurrently with the burning process, with 400 DVD to burn, I cannot wait that the capture is finished to start burning.

Any input as to increasing my RAM or other strategies to implement my plan is welcome.

Lindbergmtl
I’ve moved your last post out of the introduction thread, since that thread is not intended for asking questions, but rather, to simply get you started posting here at cdfreaks and let people know a bit about yourself.

A laptop is not the best piece of equipment for this task. I hope you have a cool environment for it, and keep airflow unrestricted.

You cannot put 13gb of avi material on a dvd without using some sort of compression. It sounds like you are capturing as uncompressed avi. Normally when capturing to avi, you use something like the HuffyUV codec, but even it produces very large files. Can you capture to xvid avi? What program are you using for the capture?

I don’t see an option other than using compression on the avi files. The largest dvds are double layer, and they only hold about 7.95 gb. The only reliable DL disks are sold under the Verbatim brand if you are interested.

By the way, your laptop’s internal drive is formatted to NTFS yes? I don’t see how you could capture a 13gb file otherwise.

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2409757]By the way, your laptop’s internal drive is formatted to NTFS yes? I don’t see how you could capture a 13gb file otherwise.[/QUOTE]

Yes, NTFS. But my client has agreed for me to do the job in mpeg-2.

What is the best program (free if possible) to capture DV (minidv) and burn on DVD (mpeg-2), any suggestions?

As of now, I am capturing with Roxio and burning using the Windows application, which seems to come with Vista.

Capturing from camcorders is not my area of specialization around here, but I’ll try to help. WinDV is a commonly used tool for capturing dv to avi files. As far as I can tell though, it requires a firewire connection from the camera to the computer. Are you using firewire or usb?
http://www.videohelp.com/tools/WinDV It is free to download and use.

If you are able to use Roxio to capture to avi files without dropped frames, I don’t see any reason not to use it.

Do you want mpeg2 files or do you want complete dvd-video that can play on any stand alone player? You can import the captured avi files into AVStoDVD and set the output to either Muxed mpeg2 files (video and audio combined into one file) or you can output as a complete dvd, with a menu if you like. AVStoDVD is free to use and can be found here: http://www.videohelp.com/tools/AVStoDVD It can be set up to burn automatically with an excellent free burning program called ImgBurn. www.imgburn.com

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2410356]Capturing from camcorders is not my area of specialization around here, but I’ll try to help. WinDV is a commonly used tool for capturing dv to avi files. As far as I can tell though, it requires a firewire connection from the camera to the computer. Are you using firewire or usb?
http://www.videohelp.com/tools/WinDV It is free to download and use.
[/QUOTE]

Yes I use a firewire.

If you are able to use Roxio to capture to avi files without dropped frames, I don’t see any reason not to use it.

Ok

Do you want mpeg2 files or do you want complete dvd-video that can play on any stand alone player? You can import the captured avi files into AVStoDVD and set the output to either Muxed mpeg2 files (video and audio combined into one file) or you can output as a complete dvd, with a menu if you like.

I want to create DVDs that can be played on DVD players hooked to TVs, and DVD players on computers, and I want users to be able to download the the mpeg-2 files on the DVD onto their computer for some footage analysis using different software. To have a menu at the start of a dvd would be great, but it is not necessary if it comes in conflict with what I want. As for sound, same thing, I want it to be not a problem when it comes to use the mpeg-2 files on different software.

AVStoDVD is free to use and can be found here: http://www.videohelp.com/tools/AVStoDVD It can be set up to burn automatically with an excellent free burning program called ImgBurn. www.imgburn.com

I already installed a free AVS package, but if I don’t pay for the license, they give me only 2 minutes worth of capturing. Is this a different bundle?

thanks for the help, much appreciated.

Yes this is a different program entirely. Give it a shot. AVStoDVD uses a highly respected mpeg2 encoder called HCenc. It is comparable to commercial mpeg2 encoders like ProCoder, CCE and MainConcept.

And AVStoDVD is entirely free to use

I am trying to use Imburn to create a DVD that will be usable for DVD players. The one DVD that I made works fine with a DVD player on my PC, but not on a DVD player standalone. Do you have any idea why?

Your Memorex disks and or the burning speed that you used are two of the more likely culprits. Some stand alone players are fairly picky about burned disks, so the best policy is to use high quality disks and burn at a moderate speed.

We recommend Verbatim 16x disks. Since I don’t know the specifications on your burner, and don’t know if it will bitset, you should probably stick with Verbatim 16x -R for best compatibility.

Are you using the laptop burner? I sincerely hope it is not a Matsushita drive, as they are some of the worst dvd burners around at the present time.

In any case, reduce the burning speed from top speed down one step. If the laptop drive has a top speed of 8x, go to 6x. If you already have an external burner, try at 8x.

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2410440]
In any case, reduce the burning speed from top speed down one step. If the laptop drive has a top speed of 8x, go to 6x. If you already have an external burner, try at 8x.[/QUOTE]

You may be right about the burning speed Kerry. I think I saw that it was burninng at 11.8 .

I will try to find the setting to lower the speed.

and I am using an external LG burner, just out of the box.

BTW, do you think Windows DVD Maker is good, it creates menus and seems to work well, but I don’t know too much about the quality of its codec/image?

Woah, I am using Windows DVD Maker and after 15 minutes of burning, it is still at 3 per cent processing, mpeg-2, one hour long file…

I tried x6 and x8, but the standalone DVD player wont read it.:frowning:

Woah, I am using Windows DVD Maker and after 15 minutes of burning, it is still at 3 per cent processing, mpeg-2, one hour long file…

Converting to another format does take time. Video encoding depends on the speed of the cpu in your computer for the most part, and laptops rarely have top of the line speed. Another problem with video encoding on laptops is the fact they only have one hard drive. You can speed up the process slightly by having one hard drive as the source and a second physical drive as the target. Not really workable in a laptop.

BTW, do you think Windows DVD Maker is good, it creates menus and seems to work well, but I don’t know too much about the quality of its codec/image?

I haven’t heard many good reports about this program. It works, but is overall rather lackluster, especially compared to the same types of programs available straight from Apple on their computers, and most commercial programs available for Windows.

I tried x6 and x8, but the standalone DVD player wont read it.

Are you still using Memorex? Are you using -R or +R disks? If you have +R disks, you can sometimes use bitsetting to make them more compatible. Depends on which burner you have and which software you are using to burn. ImgBurn can bitset with several different brands of burners. Let me know which one you have.
Try the finished dvd in another player…see if your particular test player is just extremely finicky.

Hey, you know what, since my client doesn’t require the files to be transfered in AVI, I should look into buying myself a DVD recorder and transfer the minidv tapes straight from the camera to the recorder, what da ya think?

I just need to know that the DVD recipients will be able to take the mpeg-2 files from the disks and transfer them on their hardrive for some editing needs, if they want to.

:smiley: I think midders suggested that at the start of your thread! :wink:

If you are making dvd-video, they’ll need an editing program that can handle that format. Mpeg2 in dvds are contained in the .vob files within the Video_TS folder, and many editing programs can import them directly these days.

If they have problems, tell them to use Vob2Mpg to convert the .vob files to mpeg2. It simply merges all the .vob files and renames them without any ill effects to the quality of the video. Vob2Mpg is free to download and use.

[QUOTE=Lindbergmtl;2413234]Hey, you know what, since my client doesn’t require the files to be transfered in AVI, I should look into buying myself a DVD recorder and transfer the minidv tapes straight from the camera to the recorder, what da ya think?

I just need to know that the DVD recipients will be able to take the mpeg-2 files from the disks and transfer them on their hardrive for some editing needs, if they want to.[/QUOTE]
That’s what I’d do. Most DVD recorders have firewire in and a one hour mode, so you’ll get a high enough bitrate to allow some editing. If your editor can’t handle VOB files (some can, some can’t) some options are AVIDeMux (http://www.videohelp.com/tools/AviDemux) and transcode back to DV in AVI or VOB2MPG (http://www.videohelp.com/tools/VOB2MPG)

I went to an electronics store to buy a DVD recorder today. I asked the sales guy if he knew if the DVD files were MPEG-2 (a very important thing for me). He couldn’t say…

Can anyone tell me here if the video files that we burn using video recorders are MPeg-2^?

Yes, the only video codec used in dvd-video is mpeg2. Just make sure to set the dvd recorder to Video mode, and not VR mode.