French court: Use of the word 'Torrent' shows bad intent

vbimport

#1

French court: Use of the word ‘Torrent’ shows bad intent.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2011/06/t1fXBZ.jpg[/newsimage]An administrator for two BitTorrent-related websites who was arrested in 2008 on allegations of copyright infringement and profiting from site advertising by trade group SACEM has been fined $29,000 by a French Court of Appeal, despite the fact that the court was unable to prove that illegal downloads took place and the sites did not receive any ad money.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/french-court-use-of-the-word-torrent-shows-bad-intent-46181/](http://www.myce.com/news/french-court-use-of-the-word-torrent-shows-bad-intent-46181/)


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#2

TorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrent
TorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrent
TorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrent
TorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrentTorrent

Take that france


#3

To the Guillotine with you!!!


#4

Well, the folks in France will have to find another name for the process by which many completely legal distributions of software, such as Linux distros, are distributed.

Judicial idiots.


#5

It really just depends on what the definition of “is” is…:wink:


#6

[QUOTE=olyteddy;2591211]It really just depends on what the definition of “is” is…;)[/QUOTE] Well in Denmark, “is” means either “ice” or “icecream”. Perhaps that is [sic] what confused Mr. Clinton? :stuck_out_tongue:

Maybe the French judge thinks that use of “torrents” make bad [I]internet[/I], and the translation is [sic] wrong? :smiley:

Just thought I’d share my torrent of wisdom with you. :iagree: Ooops! :doh:


#7

BTW if you think the above post was silly, then my excuse is that the French judge started it! :bigsmile:


#8

The tactics work…buy off the judges, drag out the court cases till the defendants have no money left to fight with. And set a stupid precedent that will be used later.

This game is fixed folks.


#9

From now on we shall not be the knights who say “torrent”. We shall be the knights who say… cascade, cataclysm, cataract, cloudburst, deluge, downpour, effusion, flood, flooding, flux, gush, inundation, niagara, outburst, overflow, pour, rush, shower, spate, stream, tide, or waterfall
(thanks to a thesaurus)


#10

This is what happens when judicial authorities don’t consult with outside experts and are bias towards the prosecution, believing everything they tell them.


#11

[QUOTE=iamrocket;2591266]From now on we shall not be the knights who say “torrent”. We shall be the knights who say… cascade, cataclysm, cataract, cloudburst, deluge, downpour, effusion, flood, flooding, flux, gush, inundation, niagara, outburst, overflow, pour, rush, shower, spate, stream, tide, or waterfall
(thanks to a thesaurus)[/QUOTE]

I t’ink you should add that “golden shower” thing to de list.


#12

Torrent sites are accessed by users of the BitTorrent protocol which has a main, if not unique purpose, of enabling downloading of copyright protected works.

Hmm. Pretty racist.


#13

Hm. Isn’t open source software like Open Office or Linux distros (both are officially distributed by torrents) copyrighted also?

Michael


#14

That is absolutely correct. Every bit of software that makes up the Linux Kernel and other Software that runs on it is properly copyrighted and the whole Free and open source software world depends greatly on those copyrights. What you’re missing is the license that is also used in conjunction with copyright that grants people access to the code so they can use it, peruse it and improve it if they can and share it with others. There are several versions but the most well known is the GNU Public License or GPL. There’s also the Apache license and the BSD license. All along the same vein with slight differences.

Thanks to the combination of the copyright and license you cannot take a piece of the Linux code use it in your own product and then claim that it is your own. Several companies have tried this and they’ve been called to task for the copyright violations.

Anyway, there is nothing wrong with torrenting a piece of copyrighted code that’s also been released with a GPL type license. Most Linux distros are usually shared via torrent as it takes the load off the servers at places like Canonical (Ubuntu) and Red Hat (Fedora) and it usually is quicker to download via a torrent than from the single company server.


#15

[QUOTE=kpoole;2591546]
Anyway, there is nothing wrong with torrenting a piece of copyrighted code that’s also been released with a GPL type license.[/QUOTE]Exactly, that’s what I expected :slight_smile:

But then the frenchies were correct in their statement about usage of torrents to download copyrighted software - but they didn’t think about the scenario that a copyright owner can use this evil torrent to legally distribute his own copyrighted stuff. :smiley:

Thanks,
Michael


#16

[QUOTE=WTexSkeptic;2591259]The tactics work…buy off the judges, drag out the court cases till the defendants have no money left to fight with. And set a stupid precedent that will be used later.

This game is fixed folks.[/QUOTE]

And yet people still wonder why some invididuals resort to violent and drastic measures when they become frustrated if they are stripped from correct justification.