Freezing

I burn’t Stepford Wives using Decrypter. I notice some freezing on play back. What would be doing this as Nero CD/DVD Tools said everything was ok?

Could be media or burn speed. I just tossed 20 backups, reason…I got cheap LASER brand discs! I later found they were a cyanine based disc, which is unstable and prone to fading. If your not already use a good media, use DVD-R not DVD+R as some older players arent compatible with + format. And burn it a little slower. A Firmware upgrade if ones available might help, they usually add compatibility with more media brands and formats.

this is likely a media quality issue. try using higher quality discs.

I later found they were a cyanine based disc, which is unstable and prone to fading.

i’m not sure where you got this info from, but the type of dye used has no direct correlation with the quality of the disc. in fact, Taiyo Yuden uses cyanine.

If your not already use a good media, use DVD-R not DVD+R as some older players arent compatible with + format.

dvd-r isn’t some kind of universally compatible format. there are dvd players that won’t play dvd-r as well. it all depends on the player itself. according to videohelp’s statististics on dvd players, 93% will play dvd-r, while 89% will play dvd+r, so they’re practically even. a dvd+r booktyped to dvd-rom is probably the most compatible recordable disc overall.

i’m not sure where you got this info from, but the type of dye used has no direct correlation with the quality of the disc.
Maybe you should do a little research, I’ll save you the trouble. This is from the CSIRO (Australias government science and research department)These are laymans terms reviews of the 3 types of dye used in CD/DVD-R’s:

Cyanine dyes were the earliest ones developed, and their formulation is patented by Taiyo Yuden. Cyanine dyes are naturally green in color, and are chemically unstable. This makes cyanine discs unsuitable for archival use; they can fade and become unreadable in a few years. Many manufacturers use proprietary chemical additives to make more stable cyanine discs.

Azo dye DVD-Rs are blue in color, and their formulation is patented by Verbatim. Unlike cyanine, azo dyes are chemically stable, and typically rated with a lifetime of decades.

Phthalocyanine dye DVD-Rs are usually silver or gold. The patent on pthalocyanine DVD-Rs is held by Mitsui. These are also chemically stable, and often given a rated lifetime of hundreds of years.

the type of dye used has no direct correlation with the quality of the disc.
Do you still think so?

Videohelp on -/+ format compatibility statistics:This list is entirely based from user reports. We have not tested or verified any DVD Player features
I wouldn’t take the results as Gospel.

the info you pasted (without a link) seems to come from here, except that you changed CD-R to DVD-R. if you want to link me to the Australian government’s document with what you pasted, i’d like to see. also, as you pointed out yourself, Taiyo Yuden uses cyanine dye, and they are considered far and away the highest quality disc manufacturer. if you don’t believe this, you can go visit the Media Forum. the fact still remains that the type of dye used doesn’t determine the quality of the disc.

as far as the dvd+r vs dvd-r statistics go, the sampling of tested players is high enough that the results are statistically significant.

OK you got me, must remember never to play poker with you.

the fact still remains that the type of dye used doesn’t determine the quality of the disc.
Your obviously a good googler, so why dont you do some more into CD/DVD dyes. I’ll give you some legit links: 1) http://www.opticaldisc-systems.com/2003JulyAug/Recordble34.htm 2) http://www.mam-e.com/web/sys_coul.phtml 3) http://www.123sortit.com/sanity/dvd.html
Just for Future reference though I did find LASER are beginning to use AZO dyes. Why would they do that if AZO is 50% more costly than Cyanine? Anyways we could go on forever, I’ll drop it for now.

what are those links supposed to tell me? the first one doesn’t rank the dyes; the second one is from MAM-E’s commercial website, so obviously they’re going to claim that their own dye is superior; the third one doesn’t mention the types of dyes at all, let alone ranking them.

the type of dye (cyanine, azo, phthalocyanine) doesn’t directly determine a disc’s quality; however, the quality of each manufacturer’s own dye is very important. there are good quality cyanine discs, and there are bad ones. the same goes for the other types of dyes.