Freebies Galore

vbimport

#81

[QUOTE=andrea1998;2771548][B]if only I could completely disable telemetry…[/B][/QUOTE]
^Your best bet to ‘completely disable telemetry’ would be changing the OS you work on as the telemetry is seemingly only going to get worse before hopefully getting better.
You can find more information on telemetry in [B]this thread[/B] Page 2 would probably address much of what is needed to keep it at a minimum. The rest has to be done by knowledge, clever use of firewall rules and the hosts file. Like beef barley, I will advice you only to do tasks you feel confident in doing. Also remember to stop/disable the Windows Update service after you have used PortableUpdate… the service is running after it has finished :flower:

Now then where was I, oooh yes (we ought to put up a sign on the net saying Freebies Galore ‘This way’ :p)
I keep thinking that it may be just a wee bit out left or right bringing in programming, but why not.
I might just bring one off topic part from another thread on topic here by a little rewrite too as I think I managed to remove the word advanced from it (programming is not necessarily advanced and so why say so, debugging is).

There are many free compilers for various languages and you can find many [B]here[/B] (mentioned before).
Did you know that Microsoft Visual Studio is free? At least the community edition is free, and should you be in need for just the C++ compiler, it is included in various SDK/ADK packages freely downloadable from Microsoft.
You can get an overview of visual studio [B]here[/B], check out the differences [B]here[/B] and to download the community edition, go [B]here[/B].

C++ at least Visual C++ is not much harder to learn than Visual Basic for someone without prior knowledge. Trouble is they never start and so never realize that. The higher level languages are sharing lots between them so knowing C++ I can also read and understand Java code even though I can not program in the language.
My advice is to skip Visual Basic if you do not have a prior preference in that language as it is different and will not gain you in any way if you feel the need to move on :slight_smile:

Whatever you do, do not undertake a large project when you start. That is what put most starters off programming. Next thing you know, they start telling horror stories about how hard it is - Sure is if you want the world the first day :wink:

A good introduction to a language like Visual C++ and the Visual Studio interface would be [B]this[/B] and since most soon like to view some [B]example code[/B].

I guess the most common start would probably be programming a desktop app after the first introduction, and then I would sugest to start reading [B]here[/B].

Programming should be demystified to an extent from just these links.

You can go many routes as you can code in C#, Visual Basic, F#, C++, HTML, JavaScript, Python, Xamarin and more and so it does not have to be C++, it just happens I use that language from time to time and so it was a natural example.

Learn to crawl, then walk and one day you will be running - basic principles… There is a reason for the ‘Hello World’ program! :flower:


#82

Thanks Xercus.:iagree:

I want to point out this virtual dekstop
http://www.dexpot.de/?lang=en

and for photo enthusiasts, like me, GeoSetter

http://www.geosetter.de/en


#83

I am going to stick with the fairly heavy duty stuff for now. I have used this, but it has been a while, so if anybody has any up to date info please post.

HiJackThis

Features

Lists the contents of key areas of the Registry and hard drive
Generate reports and presents them in an organized fashion
Does not target specific programs and URLs
Detects only the methods used by hijackers to force you onto their sites

https://sourceforge.net/projects/hjt/


#84

Cool picks andrea1998, a virtual desktop or two extra can tidy it all up quite much, and I was unaware of the existence of GeoSetter :slight_smile: I notice the site links to Phil Harvey’s [B]Exif Tool[/B] which is cool.
Did you know that Linux and MAC users have had virtual desktops for years? Only in Windows 10 Microsoft finally included it as part of the operating system as well. As a rough description, you can get to it by clicking (only needed parts snapped to show you all where)
Clicking on ‘Task View’ takes you to where you can add virtual desktops
If anyone wants more information thereof, use this search

@beef - Why not :slight_smile:
HiJackThis is pretty much the standard still and that log is asked for over and over. I do not think it is the lifesaver some seem to think, but it is a good tool.
[B]Runscanner[/B] is a freeware combining the power of hijackthis, autoruns and other spyware, malware, junk scanners.
Another, albeit old tool is [B]Emsisoft HiJackFree[/B], a system analysis tool to detect and remove any kinds of HiJackers, Spyware, Adware, Trojans and Worms.
Then you have [B]ESET SysInspector[/B] which examines your operating system and captures details such as running processes, registry content, startup items and network connections.

Fwiw, when we come to actual infections of new malware, we will have to do necessary research before diving into the removal as we otherwise could get the infection removed only to realize that we are left with a non-working system which more often than not means unnecessary cold edits of offline registry, .ini files and so on which is best left as a last resort.

What I stress in this field is backup… One such backup i do daily are my registries. Of course, you only need to do a system restore point to get it backed up, but the Malware’s are smarter and often infects even these. In other words, I got another tool doing one every night :slight_smile:
I am not obsessed with having the latest tool as long as an old one works, so I use [B]ERUNT[/B] from october 2005. Why not, it still works in Windows 10.
I have added a VBScript to the Task Scheduler (taskschd.msc) to take care of it all so I don’t have to forget it myself :bigsmile:
I have modified it of course and so… here it is (only UPX-unpacked and added manifest for Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, 10 so it runs as Administrator if I’m not mistaken)
The original will work from the Task Scheduler, I did the modification to avoid the right-click -> ‘Run as Administrator…’ procedure for manual runs.

First, Unpack the archive or install the original, but as a general hint for older programs, do not install to the ‘Program Files’ or in this case ‘Program Files (x86)’ hierarchy. Create a folder at the root of your system drive and name it ‘Programs’ and install older programs there. This particular utility does write config-files to its directory, and that will fail in the ordinary program files folders (this is the single most common point of failure for old programs as they need write access to their own folder which Microsofts hierarchy prohibits).

Now, in the archive, there is a file named ERUNT.vbs which needs to be adjusted to fit your paths, here it is with instruction as comments, you can alternatively save the contenst as ERUNT.vbs yourself by snapping it.

'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' Script for automating daily registry backups even in Windows 10.  The script saves the backup to
' D:\RegBackSchedule\{WD} where {WD} is the name of the day the script runs. This gives you
' a comfortable 7 day backup so you can go back a week if you need to
'
' The script does not show any information and was made for use with the Windows Task Scheduler
' and is based on original script written by Dr. Profanter Wolfgang.
'
' Change the variable for path to ERUNT.EXE (Prog) and path to backup (RegBack) below so they fit
' your setup. The actual work is done by the following command line in the scrip -
' oWS.Run Prog & " " & RegBack & "\" & WD & " sysreg curuser otherusers /noconfirmdelete"
' This expands to the following in my case -
' C\Programs\ERUNT\ERUNT.EXE D:\RegBackSchedule\{WeekDay} sysreg curuser otherusers /noconfirmdelete
'
' Last update: 2016.04.07
' Version 2.5E
'
' Xercus.
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
'
' OK, Let's get to it, I'll explain along the way ....
'
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' First of all, we have to define what we want to happen, in this case how we would like to run the
' command and to get that done, we have to define some variables.
' The two you need to change below is 'Prog' and 'Regback' to match your setup.
' Prog = path to the ERUNT.EXE program, RegBack=path to saved registry backups. The folder you select
' here will contain 7 folders named Monday-Sunday.
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dim oWS
Set oWS = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
Dat = Date
Dayno = Weekday(Dat)
WD = WeekdayName(Dayno)
Prog = "C:\Programs\ERUNT\ERUNT.EXE"
RegBack = "D:\RegBackSchedule"
'
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' The following line executes our setup above, adding the correct command switches for ERUNT to the
' end of the line
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
oWS.Run Prog & " " & RegBack & "\" & WD & " sysreg curuser otherusers /noconfirmdelete"
'
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' After the actual backup is done, we have to clean up by deleting the variables we defined.
' This is good programming manners and ensures no errors the next time the script is run.
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Set oWS = Nothing
Set Dat = Nothing
Set Dayno = Nothing
Set WD = Nothing
Set Prog = Nothing
Set RegBack = Nothing
'
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' The next command ends our script.
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WScript.Quit
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
' Finished :) 
'----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Once installed and the script edited, right-click your start menu and choose ‘Run’ or press [WinKey]+R - In the run requester, type [B]taskschd.msc[/B] and hit [Enter]


As you can see, I have expanded and right-clicked ‘Task Scheduler Library’ - select ‘Create Task’ from the context menu.


Here you must give the task a name and optionally a description. You may also change so that the task runs even if none is logged on to the computer (recommended), but the important part is to check ‘Run with highest privileges’

I am not showing the ‘Triggers’ and ‘Actions’ tabs themselves as they are empty, but in both you should click ‘New’


New Trigger, here you will set the actual schedule, but since I have set daily, we only verify that the date is not in the future (default is today) and concentrate on setting the time we want the task to execute. I have checked ‘Stop task if it runs longer than’ and set it to 30 minutes to not have hanging tasks over time. Click OK


New Action, her you set the path to ERUNT.vbs and do set the 'Start in (optional) to the path where ERUNT.EXE is. Click OK


Conditions, I did not adjust this, but as you can see the options are self-explaining.


Settings, pretty much self explaining as well, but as you can see, I have done quite some modifications to the default. Click OK

Then you’re back in the Task Scheduler main window (if you do not see your task, hit [F5] and it should become visible).
You may want to check your registry backup folder and verify that the folders monday, tuesday and so on is created the first few days, but after that you have the luxury to go back a week whenever you want.

You know the registry is a funny thing as it both is advanced and then is nowhere near as advanced as people think… Please allow me to show you something interesting about the paths:

  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT - Only a shortcut pointing to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes
  • HKEY_CURRENT_USER - Only a shortcut pointing to HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-???-???-???-100?
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE - This is real … for the most :wink:
    • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet - consists of shortcuts pointing to to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001
      HKEY_USERS - This is real … for the most :smiley:
    • S-1-5-21-???-???-???-100?_Classes - points to HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-???-???-???-100?\SOFTWARE\Classes
  • HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG - Only a shortcut pointing down in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Hardware Profiles

That is of course not to say that they can be removed which they can’t as they serve a purpose, but in reality you only have HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE and HKEY_USERS at the root.

I think that just about covers it - Can’t have more fun than boring yourself to death figuring that one out :stuck_out_tongue:
Enough for one post, I can emphasize on various types of shortcuts in another post unless someone beats me to it.




#85

^Just to clarify, the day folders (monday-sunday) are all stand alone and include the restore tool and so can be copied to a USB. Opening one of the weekday folders, you simply start ‘ERDNT.EXE’ and restore from there. just remember to right-click, Run as… if you installed using the original installer.

You may want to check ‘Other saved user registries’ as they are included.

I have introduced one simple to use registry edits to executable converter and I thought I had already done the next, but as it seems, that slipped.
Never too late, how about a batch-file to executable converter. There are a few options out there, feel free to add your preferred tool :flower:

F2KO Software [B]Bat To Exe Converter[/B]. Also has more freeware as usual…

I like this tool, as you can see at the included mouse cursor, it allows you to add the all too necessary Administrator Manifest to make sure the file runs with administrative priveleges and gets the job done without the usual right-click -> ‘Run as Administrator…’ procedure.
If you look at the other tabs, it becomes clear that you can even include tools in the files and so it is my chosen method for helping pople if I can’t help directly in a TeamViewer session. Furthermore, you can include version-information as well (it may not seem interesting adding that, but some AV applications may flag the file as suspicious if it is missing).
Then of course, you can also add your custom icon to the file to make it appear more professional (don’t overdo that part or it looks nowhere near professional, you can download my preferred icon here )

Enough for a second post… I’ll see if I can add a little more info on Manifests in a post or two for the ones of you wondering about my technical babbling :smiley: - and of course so you can make better use of Resource Hacker which was introduced earlier and do constructive work in it.
I am not entirely sure if I should do so as a Freebies Galore tutorial or just give you the facts, what would you prefer?



CMD_Win10.zip (82.7 KB)


#86

[B]Xercus thank you very much, good job, great patience.[/B]

For users who are not good with the changes of software, like me, I want to report a softwarelite virtualization

http://www.toolwiz.com/products/toolwiz-time-freeze/

saved me from big mistakes.
now with 4 hard drives in to your pc using a more complete software but not free


#87

@ Xercus, have you used or do you have an opinion on CCleaner’s registry tool? It’s not an everyday run, but about once a week I run CCleaner and then have it scan my registry. If you choose to fix the issues it finds, it will ask you if you wish to save the registry. A tip I have found with the registry scan, is to not just scan once and figure that’s it. Anyway just curious.

I like to manually update all my software and the following tool that I have used since it began, scans and then allows me to do that. I have used the site for quite a few years as well, Filehippo and their update checker. I don’t have to update through the scanner, it shows me the results and then I can go to the program and update through it. As I have quite a few programs that I don’t use all the time, it comes in handy. Obviously it is restricted to what it knows, but that is quite a few programs. It does work on my Windows 10.

FileHippo App Manager is a great application that will keep your system up-to-date. FileHippo App Manager will scan your computer for installed applications, check the versions and then send this data to FileHippo.com to ascertain if there are any newer releases available. If there are any new releases, these are then neatly displayed in your browser window for you to download*.

FileHippo App Manager is FREE, lightweight and only takes a few seconds to run! The user interface is simple to operate and has had a complete makeover from previous versions. Now you can even choose your favourite colour scheme! The FileHippo AppManager now also supports downloading and installing of updates inside the app, with even more enhancements coming soon. The new look coupled with great new features make FileHippo App Manager a must have in your software library.

http://www.filehippo.com/download_app_manager/


#88

I am not entirely sure if I should do so as a Freebies Galore tutorial or just give you the facts, what would you prefer?

Personally I see nothing wrong with showing the good folks out there how to use anything in this thread and future posts.


#89

[QUOTE=beef barley;2771693]@ Xercus, have you used or do you have an opinion on CCleaner’s registry tool? It’s not an everyday run, but about once a week I run CCleaner and then have it scan my registry. If you choose to fix the issues it finds, it will ask you if you wish to save the registry. A tip I have found with the registry scan, is to not just scan once and figure that’s it. Anyway just curious.[/QUOTE]

CCleaner is among the best tools out there, but my take on the registry is for the most leave it alone because if it is not broke, I see no reason to fix it. Once every 52 weeks ought to be enough by far unless you notice something’s wrong. I do run it as well, and if it finds say 200 errors, I uncheck everything, then goes through the list and check maybe 40-50 that I let CCleaner remove. The rest are not errors as I see it, but may contain keys that programs read. This is not just CCleaner which imo is of the better, but registry cleaners in general.
With that said, if I run it, I do run it twice - Always! This is to catch errors exposed by removing the initial errors (references to the keys you removed). These can actually be more severe than the first in some situations.

Let us take one thought example. One of the keys in the registry is exclusively accessed by ‘NT SERVICE\TrustedInstaller’ and no other user has access to that key. Now any other registry-entries referencing sub-keys found in that key will generate an error as the sub-key does not exist (since the registry cleaner does not have access to the main key and so does not see it)
Another thing that can be caused by registry cleaners is a broken uninstaller. While not participating in the discussions, I have seen many software developers being flamed due to users inappropriate use of a 3rd-party registry cleaner executing a too thorough clean.

There is, contrary to advertisers eagerness to tell us so, no real improvement in speed to be gained from just cleaning the registry, though a small short term gain can be achieved by defragmenting/compacting it.
Where CCleaner really shines is in removing temporary clutter from your computer since it supports many applications… I have found it to make computers that was almost brought to snail velocity airborne at mach 2 again after cleaning. In other words, that is something I do frequently.

I do not have a schedule for cleaning my own registry, I compact it once or twice a year on hard disks (not SSD) and check it only if I notice any errors.
Fwiw, I checked now and have 180 “errors”, fixed only 20 related to a mishap where I got Microsoft Silverlight installed and, how is it even possible, a couple of google entries.

That’s my take on this subject :flower:


#90

That’s my take on this subject

And it is appreciated.


#91

AOMEI Backupper
A reliable and safe backup & restore software to help you back up system / hard disk / partition / file, and you can also use it to clone system / partition / hard disk, or boot multiple computers with PXE Boot Tool.

AOMEI Partition Assistant
A comprehensive and powerful partition manager tool to resize, create, merge, format, and split partitions, and also, it can covert file system between NTFS and FAT32, disk type between GPT and MBR etc.

http://www.aomeitech.com/


#92

First of all, we have indeed got backup covered by the last posts, great job :clap:
I forgot to give reference links to the VBScript language in the post about ERUNT above… Sorry about that :o, but for anyone wanting to learn more about VBScript, use the following two links:
MSDN: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/d1wf56tt(v=vs.84).aspx
TechNet: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee198844.aspx

Now then, on to Manifests and it will have to be a tad more advanced than earlier, but will benefit your everyday computerlife and not cause you to abandon a program just because of a small setback like annoyance (I would very much like to keep advanced stuff on a simple level to not get you bored, there is no need to scream ‘WOLF’ unless you have to).
Pure lazyness tells us that once is better than all the time, just as in everything else, you better keep the following sentence in your mind… ‘Everything once, thoroughly!’, that is ‘pure lazyness’ - Now false lazyness is ‘not doing’, sleeping under a pile of ‘should have done’ every night is not going to benefit you in any way - See, I got a little moral in here as well, crazy ey? :smiley:

There can be many sections in a Manifest, here are a few: Compatibility, DPI awareness, Theme (style), UAC. The Manifest is in XML format, a format you can find more info on [B]here[/B] and [B]here[/B] including the Microsfot addons if you are interested
For the actual manifest specification, you will find even that for free at Microsoft’s site [B]here[/B]
Do you notice my modus operandi? All information is free! That is as it should be, If you need a step-by-step, be prepared to pay though… Which is why I show you how, even that for free - I learn most everything I know from reading the reference even programming languages and as the next hop, by trial and (t)error :slight_smile:

For this tutorial, I will advice you to read this Freebies Galore tutorial first.
Then there are these prerequisites that needs to be downloaded unless already installed:
Work environment: [B]Resource Hacker[/B]
Test Candidate: [B]CubicExplorer v0.80 portable[/B]

Download unpack/install a.s.o…

Start Resource Hacker and let us get on, down and dirty (it is Freebies Galore, right?) :bigsmile: and drag and drop CubicExplorer.exe on the Resource Hacker window to open it.

Select the [B]Action[/B] Menu and choose ‘Add using Script Template …’ as shown above

In the small window that opens, select Manifest and click on ‘Add Resource’

Now looky here, a lot of explaining allready

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
  <compatibility xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:compatibility.v1"> 
      <application> 
        <!--This Id value indicates the application supports Windows Vista functionality -->
          <supportedOS Id="{e2011457-1546-43c5-a5fe-008deee3d3f0}"/> 
        <!--This Id value indicates the application supports Windows 7 functionality-->
          <supportedOS Id="{35138b9a-5d96-4fbd-8e2d-a2440225f93a}"/>
        <!--This Id value indicates the application supports Windows 8 functionality-->
          <supportedOS Id="{4a2f28e3-53b9-4441-ba9c-d69d4a4a6e38}"/>
        <!--This Id value indicates the application supports Windows 8.1 functionality-->
          <supportedOS Id="{1f676c76-80e1-4239-95bb-83d0f6d0da78}"/>
      </application> 
  </compatibility>
  <assemblyIdentity type="win32" 
                    name="myOrganization.myDivision.mySampleApp" 
                    version="6.0.0.0" 
                    processorArchitecture="x86" 
                    publicKeyToken="0000000000000000"
  />
  <dependency>
    <dependentAssembly>
        <assemblyIdentity
            type="win32"
            name="Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls"
            version="6.0.0.0"
            processorArchitecture="*"
            publicKeyToken="6595b64144ccf1df"
            language="*"
        />
    </dependentAssembly>
  </dependency>
  <application xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
    <windowsSettings>
        <dpiAware  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/SMI/2005/WindowsSettings">true</dpiAware>
    </windowsSettings>
  </application>  
</assembly>

We need to change this of course so let us start off with the needed part to add Compatibility
GUID, sound odd, but not if you expand as far as ‘Global Unique ID’, the social security number equivalent in the Windows world. Quite a few programs, DLL’s, whatever has them, versioned and all and of course, the OS as well. That is at the core of it what we are going to tell say Windows 10… We are expected here and we need administrative access.
That is the amusing part as what we are about to add to the file on disk has nothing to do with the program it represent :slight_smile:

The GUID has a format you will know if you have browsed your registry… If you look at the code section above, you will notice that Windows 10 is missing, but fear not, Here are all the GUIDs needed and explained:
Vista: : {e2011457-1546-43c5-a5fe-008deee3d3f0}
Windows 7 : {35138b9a-5d96-4fbd-8e2d-a2440225f93a}
Windows 8 : {4a2f28e3-53b9-4441-ba9c-d69d4a4a6e38}
Windows 8.1 : {1f676c76-80e1-4239-95bb-83d0f6d0da78}
Windows 10 : {8e0f7a12-bfb3-4fe8-b9a5-48fd50a15a9a}

So to add support for windows 10, you simply add the following as line 13 and 14:

        <!--This Id value indicates the application supports Windows 10 functionality-->
          <supportedOS Id="{8e0f7a12-bfb3-4fe8-b9a5-48fd50a15a9a}"/>

Since there are comments for the rest, I added it to Windows 10 as well above, but these lines are only comments and does not need to be present.
If a program is proven not compatible with one of the operating systems, just do not add that line and windows will invoke the compatibility assistant and virtualize the file to a compatibility level supported…

Next up is the Themed or style section and indeed, this file should have one. This is the part I can not explain in an easy way, when and how to use a Themed Manifest.
That of course is not telling anybody anything, but it is related to trustinfo and when the file use and and properly initialize comctl32.dll… I can explain, but that is a long story, one full of technicality and ollydebug features, even plugins for it and so is far out (it is a fantastic tool though). I have not solved that one on an easy level and can not present a tool that can tell you if a file is properly initializing comctl32.dll (only dependency which you can even do in CFF explorer) and so I will skip the whole scenario, it is there though.
Here, we change the name=“myOrganization.myDivision.mySampleApp” to read name="CubicReality.Software.CubicExplorer"
Then we leave the next two lines alone as they are correct.
The next line, I can not figure out where he got as that is a zero token I simply can not see should be necessary.

                    publicKeyToken="0000000000000000"

Since I do disagree, I will swap that line for versioning and description.

                    version="3.3.0.0"/>
   <description>Windows Explorer alternative</description>

The rest of this section down to is correct so we will skip it

In reality, do not worry about Themed manifests and ComCtl32.dll, just skip it. That means you can under normal circumstances cut away the entire section.

<assemblyIdentity type="win32" 
                    name="CubicReality.Software.CubicExplorer" 
                    version="6.0.0.0" 
                    processorArchitecture="x86" 
                    version="3.3.0.0"/>
   <description>Windows Explorer alternative</description>
  <dependency>
    <dependentAssembly>
        <assemblyIdentity
            type="win32"
            name="Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls"
            version="6.0.0.0"
            processorArchitecture="*"
            publicKeyToken="6595b64144ccf1df"
            language="*"
        />
    </dependentAssembly>
  </dependency>

Our main concern should be to avoid that ever so boring ‘Right-Click - Run as Administrator’ procedure in this respect. This section is missing entirely in the manifest created by Resource Hacker, so we will have to add it. That is achieved by the UAC section in the manifest which is missing . This section adds a trustinfo section and mark your application with a requested execution level.
The execution level can be one of three:
“asInvoker” - Runs at the same privilege as the parent process.
“highestAvailable” - The highest privilage obtainable to the current user account
"requireAdministrator" - Requires the application to be launched with the full token of the Administrator account.

We are of course going for full administrative access:

   <trustInfo xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
      <security>
         <requestedPrivileges>
            <requestedExecutionLevel
               level="requireAdministrator"
               uiAccess="False"/>
         </requestedPrivileges>
      </security>
   </trustInfo>

DPI Awareness

   <application xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
      <windowsSettings>
         <dpiAware xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/SMI/2005/WindowsSettings">true</dpiAware>
      </windowsSettings>
   </application>

Wether or not the application is DPI or in plain English ‘Screen Resolution’ aware can pretty much be summed up as the following:
If it uses the Microsoft Windows interface, it is… If it uses a custom interface, it is not. At least that holds true for older programs.

Lastly, I did a rewrite of the entire Manifest presented to remove the comments and reformat it as I would normally write it.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
   <assemblyIdentity
      name="CubicReality.Software.CubicExplorer"
      processorArchitecture="x86"
      version="3.3.0.0"
      type="win32"/>
   <description>Windows Explorer alternative</description>
   <dependency>
      <dependentAssembly>
         <assemblyIdentity
            type="win32"
            name="Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls"
            version="6.0.0.0"
            processorArchitecture="x86"
            publicKeyToken="6595b64144ccf1df"
            language="*"
         />
      </dependentAssembly>
   </dependency>
   <trustInfo xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
      <security>
         <requestedPrivileges>
            <requestedExecutionLevel
               level="requireAdministrator"
               uiAccess="False"/>
         </requestedPrivileges>
      </security>
   </trustInfo>
   <compatibility xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:compatibility.v1">
      <application>
         <supportedOS Id="{e2011457-1546-43c5-a5fe-008deee3d3f0}"/>
         <supportedOS Id="{35138b9a-5d96-4fbd-8e2d-a2440225f93a}"/>
         <supportedOS Id="{4a2f28e3-53b9-4441-ba9c-d69d4a4a6e38}"/>
         <supportedOS Id="{1f676c76-80e1-4239-95bb-83d0f6d0da78}"/>
         <supportedOS Id="{8e0f7a12-bfb3-4fe8-b9a5-48fd50a15a9a}"/>
      </application>
   </compatibility>
   <application xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
      <windowsSettings>
         <dpiAware xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/SMI/2005/WindowsSettings">true</dpiAware>
      </windowsSettings>
   </application>
</assembly>

Just press the ‘Play’ button to compile the script

After compiling, your Manifest is becoming visible. Click the ‘Diskette’ button to save the file and you’re done.

Now, for the latest version of this app, go to http://www.cubicreality.com/ and download v0.96. Personally I like v0.8 as it is small and besides was a good example for this tutorial :slight_smile:

Hopefully I have managed to explain to you just a tad more advanced work, You can mix and match sections between

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">

and

</assembly>

like a complete manifest only asking for administrative access:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
   <trustInfo xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
      <security>
         <requestedPrivileges>
            <requestedExecutionLevel
               level="requireAdministrator"
               uiAccess="False"/>
         </requestedPrivileges>
      </security>
   </trustInfo>
</assembly>

Pretty much as you like… Now for uiAccess, you will have to sign the file using a certificate which is not free and so there’s no use explaining the additional features that comes from adding a certificate. That feature is for software developers…
I think you get the picture :flower:






#93

[B]Dia[/B]
http://dia-installer.de/


http://live.gnome.org/Dia

Dia is a program to draw structured diagrams inspired by the commercial Windows program ‘Microsoft Visio’ stand-alone addon to ‘Microsoft Office’, though more geared towards informal diagrams for casual use.
It can load and save diagrams to a custom XML format (gzipped by default, to save space), can export diagrams to a number of formats, including EPS, SVG, XFIG, WMF and PNG, and can print diagrams (including ones that span multiple pages).

As you can see, I have created the same simple mockup diagram in both programs. I do use Visio extensively, even have a macro to map the network as a structured overview is a good starting point for further work. That is not the only thing you can do though, organization-/flow-/programming- charts is just as easy. If you make use of PowerPoint chances are the Visio viewer is at play presenting that organization chart.

Then I found Dia, a free open source cross-platform program for Windows/MAC/Linux and I am rather impressed. While not quite as advanced as Visio, it still is a feasible free option and it can be extended in functionality by installing addons providing even more objects to work with.




#94

I have used this free edition for years, SUPERAntiSpyware. For myself, it mainly picks up tracking cookies, but that’s okay as far as I’m concerned.

http://www.superantispyware.com/download.html

SUPERAntiSpyware Free Edition is 100% Free and will detect and remove thousands of Spyware, Adware, Malware, Trojans, KeyLoggers, Dialers, Hi-Jackers, and Worms. SUPERAntiSpyware features many unique and powerful technologies and removes spyware threats that other applications fail to remove.

SUPERAntiSpyware Free Edition does not include real-time blocking or scheduled scanning.


#95

[QUOTE=beef barley;2771954]I have used this free edition for years, SUPERAntiSpyware. For myself, it mainly picks up tracking cookies, but that’s okay as far as I’m concerned.[/QUOTE]

Got a license for free three years ago and notice I have 31 days left. Never had it monitoring the system, but just like you simply scanned to remove tracking cookies which is included in the free edition. I find it a very valuable tool at that too :iagree:

Is that it then, no more creativity in your home computer with a price tag of no $ or ¢ required?
Why of course not, you are for the most the only limitation, or maybe in better wording, your imagination is, so stop saying it is not possible, say it is and it will come true :wink:

Need to build yourself a new home? Hmm… hehe, it will require a wee bit reading and training, but why not :slight_smile:

[B]FreeCAD[/B]

FreeCAD is an open source, cross-platform general purpose CAD software that targets product design and mechanical engineering. It is designed as a plugin/module framework divided into a core software and modules that can be added when they are needed. Geometry types and nearly all tools are stored within the modules which can be added or taken off as needed. The tools are grouped around workbenches so that only the tools you need are displayed according to the task you are doing.
While being a 3D CAD modeler, it still has the ability to sketch in 2D or to take details from a 3D model and create 2D production drawings. It does not focus specifically on 2D drawings or animation but do have motion simulation features built in.

[B]BRL-CAD[/B]

BRL-CAD is an open source cross-platform CAD systems built around constructive solid geometry (CSG) modeling and comes with many modeling features like the interactive geometry editor. In addition, BRL-CAD even offers parallel ray-tracing, path-tracing, image and signal processing tools.
CSG is an interesting way of working with 3d modeling and allows you to quickly build models which can be finalized later with all required details necessary.
.


#96

I took Autocad for a year, a long time ago. I remember our first big exam, had been working on it for weeks. Those days I had no idea about saving your work, so 3 days before handing it in, lose everything. For 3 straight days and nights I slept, drank and ate Autocad. I think there were 2 reasons why I did not continue, lack of computer knowledge and found out at that time, it was pretty well the lowest paying job in our part of the country. Talking about backup, here is another with a free edition, that I have just used recently.

http://www.easeus.com/download/free-software.html


#97

^ Autocad is a beast of a program, for most individuals though, FreeCAD will more than fit their needs :slight_smile:

Now then, since I forgot to prepare information yesterday, let us go for some good old fun. I try to spend about 30 minutes with games every day as it is actually important. Playing a game that relies on reflexes rests the analytic part of your brain and charges it for hours of brainstorming afterwards and if your work is physical and/or routine related, a game challenging the analytical parts of the brain will help you stay sharp :wink:
Personally, my gaming heydays was with the Commodore Amiga and the coin-ops of the 80s and so I am mostly in for action and mostly games that only takes five minutes as I hardly have time for more (there’s always learning that needs to be done). During weekends and holidays though, I enjoy playing a puzzle game like Sokoban, a solitaire game which challenge the thought/not based on luck, chess etc.

There is a thread already in this forum, so this will be a brief post focusing on just a few cross-platform games. For more free games, please go to [B]this thread[/B].

[B]SuperTux[/B] - Classic 2D jump’n run sidescroller game for Win/MAC/Linux in a style similar to the original Super Mario games. Supports joystick.
[B]Pingus[/B] - Lemmings-like puzzle game currently featuring 77 playable levels and runs under a wide variety of operating systems (Linux, Windows, MacOSX, etc.)
[B]Glest[/B] - Real time strategy computer game set in a medieval world. The two factions battling for control are Tech and Magic, each having its own types of buildings, combat units and upgrades.
[B]Ultimate Stunts[/B] - Win/MAC/Linux remake of the famous DOS-game stunts. Racing in Ultimate Stunts involves spectacular stunts, like loopings, corkscrews, bridges to jump over, etc. Comes with track-editor. [B]Sourceforge page[/B].

Then for the old Pinball Wizards out there, there is this DIY pinball. [B]Mission Pinball framework[/B] - Way too much work to undertake for leisure in my case, but I hope to find time to take part in such a project sometime…
I really do not have a clue how much money I did spend playing Pinball in my youth but we’re talking MUCH. As a sidenote, I can say that the ultimate computer simulation I have played has to be Timeshock! released by Empire interactive back in 1998. It is the only time I have forgotten I was playing on a PC (the physics really are that good), while not free, you can gets some more info and screenshots for free over at [B]GOG[/B].

Edit: Lastly, here is a Pacman clone, a flashbased swf for your web browser. Very true to the original coin-op, that is… just as frustrating :bigsmile:

Pacman_E.zip (37.9 KB)


#98

[QUOTE=Xercus;2770717]While such editors were widespread and quite frequently used back in the DOS days[/QUOTE]
Reminds me of my BBS days. I used TheDraw a lot back in those days.


#99

[QUOTE=Xercus;2772090]Lastly, here is a Pacman clone, a flashbased swf for your web browser. Very true to the original coin-op, that is… just as frustrating :bigsmile:[/QUOTE]

Try Not Pacman.
It’s pretty awesome. :slight_smile:


#100

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2772110]Try Not Pacman.
It’s pretty awesome. :)[/QUOTE]
Now that was not frustrating at all :iagree: :stuck_out_tongue: … The name fits though, Not Pacman and I have not finished the first level after three games :disagree: :bigsmile:
Cross-platform with source as well, great find :flower:

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2772108]Reminds me of my BBS days. I used TheDraw a lot back in those days.[/QUOTE]
:clap: Know, I have used many and sometimes when nostalgia hits me, I waste a little time in programs like this to somehow bring the good old days a little closer yet again :flower: