Format Size loss?

Are there any drives from reputable brands that loses the minimum amounts of data after formatting?

Wooot? Isnt it the whole point of formatting?

I’ll assume that you’re talking about the size of the available space on a drive AFTER formatting. And there’s no difference. The space used by formatting is determined by the formatting used, not the drive. If that’s not the question, then I don’t have a clue what it is.

Hard drive manufacturers specify capacity in power of 10^3 bytes (1000), rather than 2^10 bytes (1024).

This means you get a large gap between the GB specified by the HDD manufacturers & the actual capacity.

The higher you go, the larger the difference …

1MB=4.5% less
1GB =9% less
1TB =13% less

I always figure .93% of the drive manufacturers rated capacity is what you’ll have after formating the drive
because advertising a drives larger size is just a marketing gimmick. Which one would you think the average
non technical informed Joe schmoe would be more interested in buying, a drive advertised as 1TB or the same
drive advertised as 930GB remember advertised size sells the bigger the better. :wink:

120GB x .93% = 111GB
250GB x .93% = 232GB
300GB x .93% = 279GB
500GB x .93% = 465GB
750GB x .93% = 697GB
1000GB or 1 TB x .93% = 930GB

[quote=getit29;1982700]I always figure .93% of the drive manufacturers rated capacity is what you’ll have after formating the drive
because advertising a drives larger size is just a marketing gimmick. Which one would you think the average
non technical informed Joe schmoe would be more interested in buying, a drive advertised as 1TB or the same
drive advertised as 930GB remember advertised size sells the bigger the better. :wink:

120GB x .93% = 111GB
250GB x .93% = 232GB
300GB x .93% = 279GB
500GB x .93% = 465GB
750GB x .93% = 697GB
1000GB or 1 TB x .93% = 930GB[/quote]
You are right on the money, my 250gbs hdd formatted to 232 and my 150gb Raptor formated to 139gbs.

[quote=getit29;1982700]I always figure .93% of the drive manufacturers rated capacity is what you’ll have after formating the drive
because advertising a drives larger size is just a marketing gimmick.[/quote]
On a technical note …
0.93% of 120GB is 1.116GB
1TB is 1024GB …

I think the drive manufacturers depend on the fact that consumers are exceedingly bad at math & generally ignorant :wink: Not everyone reads online guides or is computer literate.
Eww … icky! I got maths on my finger …

And then you can also complain that gigabit ethernet isn’t really gigabit, because it’s based on 10^x also, rather than 2^x0.

Any technology based on serial access uses 10^x :wink:

[QUOTE=alan1476;1982836]You are right on the money, my 250gbs hdd formatted to 232 and my 150gb Raptor formated to 139gbs.[/QUOTE]

My 250 also formatted to 232, and my 500 formatted to 465, so the formulas are correct.

[QUOTE=Goit;1976467]Are there any drives from reputable brands that loses the minimum amounts of data after formatting?[/QUOTE]

Nope so much space is need for system resources.

Clearly harddrives are offered with the info of “unformatted available space”.
Formatting, the Filesystem etc. uses also an amount of the space.

why do people say you lose space when formatting? … check the Bytes of the drive NOT the big number of GB.

cause for example i have a 400GB hard drive and my “CAPACITY” (right click hard drive and select properties and check it’s CAPACITY) says “400,086,876,160 bytes” and next to that it says 372GB… so basically i DO have 400GB like the hard drive is rated at… actually i have 86MB MORE than 400GB.

and like chef said… the drive does use some of that hdd space for file system etc etc but it’s very little (probably 100MB tops) to where you aint really going to notice it.

Because manufacturers work to 10^3 (1000) not 2^10 (1024), so it’s capacity as reported at GB’s, is not corresponding for the computer world, where they are used.

This is an old post but just in case you still have questions on Disk formatted capactiy…

Each manufacturer releases Specs on their drives and most include a “Formatted Capacity” number. That number is usually shown in MB’s but those aren’t “real” Megabytes - instead they are “short MB’s” of only 1 Million (1M) bytes per MB.

To figure out how much real formatted capacity (before adding a file system) you will have (and Windows and other OS’es will show) - get that number. Multiply it by 1M to get the number of total formatted bytes. Then divide that by 1024 to get KB’s, by 1024 again to get MB’s, 1024 again to get GB’s and finally 1024 again to get TB’s.

Example - WD Caviar 2TB WD20EARS disk drive.
Formatted capactiy from Specs = 2,000,398 “Short” MB’s

Bytes = 2,000,398 x 1M = 2,000,398,000,000 B
KB’s = 2,000,398,000,000/1024 = [FONT=Times New Roman]1,953,513,672 KB[/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman]MB’s = [FONT=Times New Roman]1,953,513,672/1024 = [FONT=Times New Roman]1,907,728 MB[/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman]GB’s = [FONT=Times New Roman]1,907,728/1024 = [FONT=Times New Roman]1863 GB[/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman]TB’s = [FONT=Times New Roman]1863/1024 = 1.819 TB[/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman]You can obviously combine the division operations to arrive directly at GB’s or TB’s but I wanted to show each step.[/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
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[FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman]JPro[/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
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Further update on my last post:

After formatting my new 2TB SATA WD Caviar drive I came up with the following stats on what space was left. I used 32-bit Windows Vista Ultimate with an single partition using NTFS and all the NTFS defaults.

Original Formatted Bytes = 2,000,398,000,000

Usable Bytes Remaining = 2,000,396,742,656
Difference in Bytes = 156,192,640
(148.95MB)

Windows only showed that it was using 154,935,296 Bytes which is 147.75MB. That leaves 1,257,344 Bytes (1.99MB) unaccounted for and assumed lost in formatting whether to formatting structures or bad blocks.

We lost a total of 148.95MB out of the potential formatted drive space prior to the NTFS formatting process. That is a tiny faction of the total and doesn’t alter the practical usable space for the drive.

The net is that the real difference people see between the advertized capacity of a drive (2TB in this case) and the resulting usable space after formatting with an OS (1.819TB) is due to storage manufacturers using only 1 Million bytes in each of their disk “Megabytes” instead of 1,048,576. Interestingly enough, they tend to use the standard “full” MB when calculating sizes of disk CACHE. So memory cache is calculated using the standard MB size and disk storage space is done using the “Short” MB of 1 Million bytes even.

Hope this helps you…

JPro
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