Five DVD-RAM questions

vbimport

#1

I have some questions about DVD-RAM:

[ol]
[li]Why do those who prefer discs without cartridges prefer this, but without switching to either DVD-RW, DVD+RW, or even the DVD+/-R formats? Personally I see the main advantage of DVD-RAM is durability due to the cartridge. You can easily attach labels to the cartridge and the disc can be easily wrot to both sides without worrying about trickly handling or writing on the discs.[/li][li]What’s the best drive to get that deals with DVD-RAM in cartridge? I would especially like to use double-sided (TYPE-4) DVD-RAM.[/li][li]Are there any big advantages to archiving data in DVD-RAM rather than, say tape drives?[/li][li]What kinds of data are best-suited for DVD-RAM over DVD+/-R/RW? I was thinking only photos & documents (any data that’s updated and modified a lot), but perhaps others have different ideas as well.[/li][li]What wouldn’t be worth investing in DVD-RAM for? (eg. what is better left to DVD+/-R/RW rather than DVD-RAM?)[/li][/ol]Thanks very much…


#2
  1. Cartridges take up more space and are ugly.
  2. I don’t know what drives use DVD-RAM cartridge type media. The LG 4163B and the Panasonic SW-9585 are two current consumer market drives that can write non-cartridge style DVD-RAM.
  3. Cost. DVD-RAM is much cheaper than DLT drives/tapes.
  4. All types of data.
  5. DVD Video. DVD game backups. Bootable DVDs that you want to use on a wide range of systems.

DVD-RAM is much more robust, reliable and has a greater rewriting capacity compared to DVD±RW media.
It can be formatted with a FAT32 filesystem to allow drag and drop ease of use.
Built in error checking should produce reliable backup writing every time.

Check this page for more info and tests: http://www.cdfreaks.com/article/172/8


#3

Thanks. I should’ve included this, but how’s Linux support? Can DVD-RAM use a Linux filesystem, like ext3 or similar, and allow a Linux system to be installed on the DVD-RAM?


#4

Hmm I’m not sure about that one.
CD-R and DVD±R media can both be used for bootable Linux discs, so I don’t see why DVD-RAM media couldn’t handle it (unless the Linux OS in use doesn’t support DVD-RAM? )


#5

OK. Nice. :slight_smile:


#6

The cartridges are great. So many people don’t like them, but their seems to be no logical reason.

DVD-RAM is much better in all respects than other DVD optical media. Packet writing on - and plus is a joke. Dont do it for data you care about.


#7
  1. Cartridges are expensive and few people like to use them. Nobody has important data.

#8

Let’s hope [B]adam917[/B] still cares about answers to his questions now, 16 months after he posted this thread! :wink:


#9

Oops. My bad. I’m trying not to bring old threads up, but sometimes I just forget to look at the date ^^"