Fast ways to copy a 1000 CD collection

Hi,
I have a 1000 cds and small children who destroy them. I wnat to copy them to harddrives and then convert them to different fromat as required

if I buy
2 SATA 2 combo drives and
2 hard drives
can I copy 2 CDs at once at full speed ?

Can I just copy as RAW (???) and then do the conversion later to MP3/OGG and is this faster ?

Does the motherboard make any difference ?

regards and thanks

Welcome to the forum. If this is the case uploading them thru Windows media player then creating folders on the HDD’s them simply dragging them into the folders, also being connected to the web while doing this will add the text and album info. automatically to the songs and thumbnails to the folders. Its easy and fast too.

Hi,[QUOTE=LAMPWAKE;1978513]Hi,
I have a 1000 cds and small children who destroy them.[/quote]:doh: I can imagine that :wink:

I wnat to copy them to harddrives and then convert them to different fromat as required
Ok. Good idea.

if I buy
2 SATA 2 combo drives and
2 hard drives
can I copy 2 CDs at once at full speed ?
What is our definition of “full speed”? Digital Audio Extraction is different from just copying files off a data CD. Most optical drives are much slower in DAE (this also depends on the software that is used).
For ripping two discs at the same time, you have to run two instances of your ripping software. I’d recommend either ExactAudioCopy or CDex. Forget Windows Media Player for that job.
Please also note that both instances of your software will write to the same HDD by default. I don’t know what happens if different target drives are chosen.

Can I just copy as RAW (???) and then do the conversion later to MP3/OGG and is this faster ?
The total processing time is the same. But ripping to WAV preserves the original quality, OGG and MP3 are lossy. Fortunately there are also lossless audio compresors like FLAC available.
From this high quality source material you can create MP3 or OGG for daily use if you want.

Does the motherboard make any difference ?
Some motherboard chipsets (like VIA) don’t support SATA optical drives well. Also, SATA drives don’t like being connected to controllers that are configured as RAID.

Michael