Failed burns with Verbatim CD-Rs + which brands should I get

vbimport

#1

Having managed to apparently buy some write-once, read-never Verbatim CD-Rs, I’m looking for advice on which CD-R brands actually work these days.

The CD-Rs I bought were a cake of 50 Verbatim printable AZO CD-Rs (re-order code #43309). Near the spindle is the code ZE4347-CDR-A80A AZO. Plextools claims they are “Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation (type 3), 79:59:73” and good for up to 48x.

So far I’ve had the following results:

Plextor PX-W4824A CD-RW: Seems to be a bit slow to detect them, but can both write to them and read written ones.
Plextor PX-755A CD-RW/DVD-RW: Gets stuck trying to detect them (and hangs Plextools), both with blank and burnt ones.
Hitachi HL-DT-ST laptop CD-RW/DVD-RAM: Happily burns discs with no issues at any speed… but fails to detect any that have been written (either by it or by the Plextor).

So, am I just unlucky with this batch or should I avoid Verbatim AZO discs and get something else?


#2

Welcome to the forum.

Verbatim AZO CD-R should be good, but production standards have slipped and the quality isn’t what it used to be. However they shouldn’t be that bad.

How many of these discs have you tried in each drive? And have you tested the drives with other CD-R, to verify that it is not a hardware fault?

Can you post a photo of the packaging please? Which country were they made in? And what is the hub serial number?

Also, which country are you in?

If the discs are as bad as they seem, I would urge you to contact Verbatim. Their discs normally come with a ‘lifetime warranty’ and Verbatim Europe are very good at replacing discs which are defective.


#3

The problem with Verbatim optical media is that it is so inconsistent from batch to batch, particularly after the packaging change quite a few years back. Part of the problem lies with the fact that there are several manufacturers contracted to produce optical discs for Mitsubishi/Verbatim. Currently, those manufacturers include CMC Magnetics Corporation (Taiwan), Moser Baer India Limited (India) and Falcon Technologies International LLC (UAE).

It is very easy to distinguish the products produced by each manufacturer, however it may be difficult to distinguish the actual production type within the packages. For example, CMC produces CD-Rs for Verbatim using both their own phthalocyaine formulation as well as Mitsubishi/Verbatim’s Azo formulation, unless the packaging specifically states ‘AZO’.

Based on personal experience, all Falcon-produced Verbatim products have been of very good quality, and most CMC Azo products are also very good. I dislike Verbatim products produced by MBI.


#4

[QUOTE=Ibex;2759375]How many of these discs have you tried in each drive?[/QUOTE]
I’ve done 3 with the laptop drive at varying speeds, and a couple with the Plextor W4824A.

And have you tested the drives with other CD-R, to verify that it is not a hardware fault?
Unfortunately not, as these are the only blank CD-Rs I’ve got. I’m reasonably sure that it’s not a hardware fault based on all three drives experiencing some level of difficulty.

I did successfully burn a DVD-R with the laptop drive the other day so at least those work :slight_smile:

Can you post a photo of the packaging please? Which country were they made in? And what is the hub serial number?
I’ve attached scans of the top and bottom of the paper ‘disc’, and of a blank CD-R. I can’t see a country name on the packaging. The codes near the hub are “4050 55 L E 02:44” and I think “ZE4347-CDR-A80A AZO”.

Also, which country are you in?
England. The discs came from scan.co.uk

If the discs are as bad as they seem, I would urge you to contact Verbatim. Their discs normally come with a ‘lifetime warranty’ and Verbatim Europe are very good at replacing discs which are defective.
Thanks, I’ll have to follow that up. If I get the chance I’ll try a couple more test burns, but the fact that the PX-755A refuses to touch them is not a good sign.

@terminalvelocd: Is there an easy way to tell them apart when ordering, or is it pot luck as to what I’ll end up getting?






#5

^ those would be made by Moser Baer India (based on the format of the hub code - the stamper code ZE… verifies that it’s meant to be a genuine Verbatim disc). Maybe someone will have a tip on how to avoid these.

If all else fails, Ritek’s CD-R make for good daily use discs, but there’s probably a greater chance of having sub-par discs delivered.


#6

Sanyo laser (OPU)-SF-DS10 K \ N \ L (also identical to the NEC ND-355x \ 455X) have problems with the new batch of CD-Rs from MBI 97m17s06f and CD-R by CMC 97m26s66f Made in China. What is interesting older parts of these producers and the same codes are functioning properly …:doh::eek::confused::eek:


#7

CMC vs. MBI cakebox packaging is easy to distinguish. CMC has a high-lip cakebox cover with the plastic wrap not overlapping the lip. MBI has a low-lip cakebox cover with the plastic wrap overlapping the lip. CMC = Made in Taiwan or China. MBI = Made in India.


#8

[QUOTE=terminalvelocd;2759572]CMC vs. MBI cakebox packaging is easy to distinguish. CMC has a high-lip cakebox cover with the plastic wrap not overlapping the lip. MBI has a low-lip cakebox cover with the plastic wrap overlapping the lip. CMC = Made in Taiwan or China. MBI = Made in India.[/QUOTE]

So this allows you to check and return the discs to the site without opening the package. Smart. :cool:

Still not as nice as going to the store in person to verify before you buy, but probably just as inconvenient.


#9

I never did get to the bottom of all the issues with those CD-Rs, but the other day I managed to solve one puzzle: the PX-755A failing to detect those discs. It turns out that that drive was fine with pressed CDs, but couldn’t read any CD-Rs (blank or burnt). So on the off chance it was just dusty I took it apart and cleaned the lens with some lens cleaner and a cotton bud, and although it struggles a bit it will now detect those Verbatim AZO CD-Rs.

Why a dirty lens caused problems with CD-Rs but not DVD-Rs is a mystery to me (I would have thought the tighter tolerances in DVDs would be more of an issue), but there you go!


#10

DVDs & CDs use different wavelengths of light for reading/writing. So all DVD writer have two laser diodes within the same OPU - one for CDs & one for DVDs.

The numerical aperture for CDs & DVDs is close enough that a single lens can be used for both. But not for Blu-ray discs. So Blu-ray drives have a second lens for the blue laser.

Unlike most solid state components, the laser diodes in optical drives have a limited lifespan and their performance degrades over time & with usage. So an old and/or well-used drive will eventually be unable to produce enough laser power. Common signs of this are a drive which is unable to recognise some discs or reports a calibration error when attempting to write disc. Because there are separate laser diodes for CDs & DVDs, one often finds that only one type of disc is affected.

Contamination on the OPU lens will reduce the amount of light reaching the disc and then the optical sensor on the return path, in effect reducing the effective power of the laser and causing the same symptoms. Cleaning the lens often helps, but it will probably be only a temporary fix. Unless the lens was very dirty, the root cause is most likely an aging/worn out laser diode.