Facebook copyright claims find users locked out with no recourse

vbimport

#1

Facebook copyright claims find users locked out with no recourse.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2011/04/FU1nU8.jpg[/newsimage]Is Facebook taking notes on how to deal with copyright infringement accusations from US Immigration and Customs (ICE) enforcement officials? It certainly seems that way, as the social network’s response to complaints seems to closely resemble the government agency’s domain seizure tactics.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/facebook-copyright-claims-find-users-locked-out-with-no-recourse-43887/](http://www.myce.com/news/facebook-copyright-claims-find-users-locked-out-with-no-recourse-43887/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Strange, I thought that Facebook originated from a bunch of pirates…
If I’m to believe the movie, one of the exercises to get a job there was to drink beer and hack a server to root, and wasn’t Sean Parker the leader of that most famous pirating program Napster? How quickly attitudes change when it comes to gaining their own profits.


#3

I think the best thing a small business can do is invest a small sum into buying a domain and getting someone to design their website where fans can become members independent of Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, etc. Then use social websites as a way of adding on, rather than relying on one as their only or main means of advertising or getting fans.

With a domain, unless you are suspect of large copyright infringement (e.g. linking to movie downloads), chances are that you’ll get several warnings about an individual copyright infringement before the website is shutdown, where as I’m sure with Facebook, someone who complains about their work being used such as a copyright background image will result in the account being suspended. Even if a paid hosting account is suspended, I’m sure it is easier dealing with the hosting provider’s support than Facebook support, especially when you’re a paying customer.


#4

Err, Ken Fisher is not a reporter at Ars Technica, he is the former owner and still general manager of the site since they sold the business to Conde Nast Digital.


#5

…and wasn’t Sean Parker the leader of that most famous pirating program Napster?

Shawn Fanning


#6

you’re right, I gotta brush up on my Wikipedia skillz. I guess the movie confused me…


#7

[QUOTE=iamrocket;2586384]If I’m to believe the movie, one of the exercises to get a job there was to drink beer and hack a server to root, and wasn’t Sean Parker the leader of that most famous pirating program Napster? How quickly attitudes change when it comes to gaining their own profits.[/QUOTE]
I guess you don’t realize that the “Social Network” movie is a piece of fiction? That story is made up. There are definitely some partial truths in there, but the story is considered fiction.