External DVD Writer Connected to Laptop

vbimport

#1

I read many internet posts talking about external dvd writers attached to laptops via usb 2.0 port. According to these posts, the power requirement of usb 2.0 ports won’t allow external dvd writers to write on dvd +/- discs at speeds greater than 4X regardless of the external dvd writer maximum writing speed. Is this correct?

I was planning to purchase an external dvd writer which can write at 20X for dvd +/- discs. According to what I read, it would not be possible to write at 20X because of the limitation associated with the power requirement needed by the dvd writer and not having enough power sent through the usb 2.0 port. Is this correct?

I own a laptop with usb 2.o ports and I don’t plan on buying a desktop computer for burning dvds. If it’s not possible to use an external dvd writer for writing at speeds greater than 4X for a laptop computer, what other options do I have which will allow my laptop to write at speeds greater than 8X?

:slight_smile:


#2

Hi,[quote=Super Mario;2060956]I read many internet posts talking about external dvd writers attached to laptops via usb 2.0 port. According to these posts, the power requirement of usb 2.0 ports won’t allow external dvd writers to write on dvd +/- discs at speeds greater than 4X regardless of the external dvd writer maximum writing speed. Is this correct?[/quote]There are a couple of host-powered external drives (pricey external slim drives) on the market (I think, Freecom has some), and these indeed reduce their speeds in order to not to overload the USB connection.

I was planning to purchase an external dvd writer which can write at 20X for dvd +/- discs. According to what I read, it would not be possible to write at 20X because of the limitation associated with the power requirement needed by the dvd writer and not having enough power sent through the usb 2.0 port. Is this correct?
No. These units come with an own power supply unit, so limited power is no issue there.
Speed restrictions might be present due to the speed of the internal HDD or the USB interface.

Michael


#3

[QUOTE=mciahel;2061047]Hi,There are a couple of host-powered external drives (pricey external slim drives) on the market (I think, Freecom has some), and these indeed reduce their speeds in order to not to overload the USB connection.
[/QUOTE]
but you forgot to say that this selfpowered DVD burners are very suspect since there are no drives fulfilling the 500mA of the USB specification. The drive may work buspowered or not, and finally the drive may damage the power line of a USB port or not.
A selfpowered drive is not recommended at all, specially for Notebook usage since lot Notebooks fulfilling the 500mA buspower…
I’d recommend a normal desktop drive in an external enclusure with own power supply.


#4

Hi,[quote=TM;2061079]but you forgot to say that this selfpowered DVD burners are very suspect since there are no drives fulfilling the 500mA of the USB specification.[/quote]I have not found any information about the power demand of an external slim drive in bus powered opearation mode. At least, these are limited to 4x in bus powered mode, with a PSU attached, they allow operation at max speed, which is 8x.

The drive may work buspowered or not, and finally the drive may damage the power line of a USB port or not.
:iagree: I share your opinion.

I’d recommend a normal desktop drive in an external enclusure with own power supply.
This is the only option of the original poster, since he wants a 20x drive :bigsmile:

Michael


#5

Another reason slim-type drives are slower is they aren’t big enough to put a powerful motor in.


#6

Plus the power to run everything on a slimtype is about a third of the power of a USB external burner.


#7

Here is an interesting post I found on another website and it’s quoted as follows:

http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=117821

[I]There is an error in the answer given:
“The IDE interface on most modern computers runs at
burst speeds of 66 or 100 megabits per second, with average data rates
as high as 66 megabits per second.”

This is not true. Ultra-ATA/66 and Ultra-ATA/100 transfer at 66 and
100 megaBYTES per second respectively, not 66 and 100 megaBITS per
second. This translates to 528 megabits per second and 800 megabits
per second for the common IDE speeds. USB 2’s 480 megabits per second
is definitely not faster than ATA66 or ATA100, though it is faster
than ATA33. The newer ATA/133 runs at 133 megabytes per second and
Serial ATA version 1.0 runs at 150 megabytes per second.
[/I]

Is the info contained in this post correct?

I also read on other sites saying that I can add esata ports to my laptop using an esata pcmcia cardbus connected to my laptop. This in turn will allow my laptop to transfer data at a speed of 1.5 Gb/s. I assume this will allow my laptop to write at 8X or above. Has anyone had success with the use of esata cardbus for their laptops?


#8

Hi again,

don’t get confused by figures often abused by marketing.:wink:
This is what matters:

[list=1.][li] The effective speed of your HDD. For 8x burning, you need a minimum read speed of 12 MByte/sec, for 16x, 24 MByte/sec are needed.[/li][li]The real speed of your USB controller. They all claim something like “up to 480 mbps”, but poor USB chipsets max out at 16 Mbyte/sec (or even lower). Same applies to add-on controllers (I haven’t seen any that is faster than 16 MByte/sec yet)[/list][/li]That said, provided your HDD is fast enough (test with HDTune for example), and you have a chipset with decent USB implementation, you should be able to run an external Half-Height DVD burner at least at 12x or even 16x.

With eSata cardbus controllers, the bottlenecks will be the HDD and the PCI performance of your notebook chipset. 1,5 Gbps is another marketing driven value with limited effect in real world application.

Michael


#9

[QUOTE=mciahel;2061204]Hi again,

don’t get confused by figures often abused by marketing.:wink:
This is what matters:

[list=1.][li] The effective speed of your HDD. For 8x burning, you need a minimum read speed of 12 MByte/sec, for 16x, 24 MByte/sec are needed.
[/li][li]The real speed of your USB controller. They all claim something like “up to 480 mbps”, but poor USB chipsets max out at 16 Mbyte/sec (or even lower). Same applies to add-on controllers (I haven’t seen any that is faster than 16 MByte/sec yet)[/list]
[/li]That said, provided your HDD is fast enough (test with HDTune for example), and you have a chipset with decent USB implementation, you should be able to run an external Half-Height DVD burner at least at 12x or even 16x.

With eSata cardbus controllers, the bottlenecks will be the HDD and the PCI performance of your notebook chipset. 1,5 Gbps is another marketing driven value with limited effect in real world application.

Michael[/QUOTE]

Well said! I agree. :iagree:


#10

Thanks for the help.

I tried several external DVD 20X writers connected to my laptop via usb 2.0 and I still get a writing speed of 4X. Sometimes I’m able to get 4.5X. I had spoken with several computer technicians working at several computer stores here in my town and they told me many of their corporate customers are having the same problem. They didn’t suggest any solution for this problem. I’m glad I’m not the only one in this boat.

I used the HD Tune program to test my hard drive. The results for my hard drive are as follows:

Transfer Rate:

[ul]
[li]Minimum: 5.4 MB/sec[/li][li]Maximum: 31.3 MB/sec[/li][li]Average: 26.6 MB/sec[/li][/ul]

[ul]
[li]Access Time: 17.6 ms[/li][li]Burst Rate: 69.9 MB/sec[/li][li]CPU Usage: 4.0%[/li][/ul]

I read the following post:

http://club.cdfreaks.com/f87/external-optical-drives-218348/

According to the above post, a person placed a sata DVD writer into a sata DVD writer external enclosure. He then plug this device into a sata express card that was connected to his express card slot on his laptop. According to this person, he did achieve writing speed of 18X with his external DVD writer connected to his laptop computer via sata express card. Has anyone else had DVD burning success with this configuration? Would this configuration actually work?

From several websites, I read that express card port offer higher transfer speed than the one offered by the pcmcia port. Therefore, using a sata express card will result in higher data transfer rate. Is this correct?

If I connected a sata express card to my laptop and used a sata external dvd writer, would I be able to write at 8X or above given the transfer rate for my laptop hard drive as stated previously? I don’t care for writing speed of 16X or even 20X because those speeds are hard to obtain and not needed for producing high quality burns.

The reason why I want to write at higher speeds (8X or above) is because I want to make backup copies of movies I own. I noticed writing at 4X using Verbatim 16X discs had caused a lot of coasters to be created. Many of the copies had either frozen in the dvd player or didn’t run at all. I read many posts on this site saying that writing at 8X or 12X for 16X rated media will work in most cases.

Please help!!!


#11

I have an older 1.7 Pent M, 1 gig of RAM lappy using a Galaxy Metal Gear USB/eSATA box with one of my Samsung S203B’s SATA drive inside. I purchased an eSATA PCMCIA card for my lappy and with that combo i can burn at 20x using the eSATA side. I also get 20x burns using my desktops eSATA and that same box.

If i remember right i could only get reliable 12x burns on the USB side with my lappy.


#12

Hi,[quote=Super Mario;2061922]
I tried several external DVD 20X writers connected to my laptop via usb 2.0 and I still get a writing speed of 4X. Sometimes I’m able to get 4.5X.[/quote]Is this the plain burning process or is some kind of processing involved (including direct copy from the internal drive or verification)?
Also please provide some information about your laptop, especially the USB controller.
Either the USB controller is junk, or you are using poor media that is supported at 4x only by the drives you have tested.

I used the HD Tune program to test my hard drive. The results for my hard drive are as follows:

Transfer Rate:

[ul]
[li]Minimum: 5.4 MB/sec[/li]> [li]Maximum: 31.3 MB/sec[/li]> [li]Average: 26.6 MB/sec[/li]> [/ul]

Forget 20x. The HDD might be fast enough for 12x or perhaps 16x, but that’s all.

At the moment, I own two notebooks:
#1 is a 6 yrs old Toshiba without USB2.0.
I added a Cardbus USB2.0 adapter (NEC based) and I am able to burn at 8x with that setup.
#2 is a new Dell Vostro 1500 with Intel chipset.
16x via USB is no problem here. I can’t test faster speeds, since my drives aren’t fast enough (mostly limited by the external enclosure).

I noticed writing at 4X using Verbatim 16X discs had caused a lot of coasters to be created. Many of the copies had either frozen in the dvd player or didn’t run at all.
Okay, this should rule out the media. Looks as if there were some bottleneck in your system. Please provide the information I requested above.

Michael


#13

[quote=Bob;2061934]I have an older 1.7 Pent M, 1 gig of RAM lappy using a Galaxy Metal Gear USB/eSATA box with one of my Samsung S203B’s SATA drive inside. [/quote]You’re lucky on your side of the big pond. 36 USD - that’s 23 EUR. Unfortunately, 5,25" eSata enclosures are practically not available here:sad:


#14

[QUOTE=mciahel;2062092]You’re lucky on your side of the big pond. 36 USD - that’s 23 EUR. Unfortunately, 5,25" eSata enclosures are practically not available here:sad:[/QUOTE]yeah plus i had to purchase an eSATA PCMCIA card for about the same price. Maybe it was around $20 usd i don’t remember.

You should remember when gashliquor and i were trying out eSATA cases? I believe you were in that thread back when?


#15

[quote=Bob;2062097]yeah plus i had to purchase an eSATA PCMCIA card for about the same price. Maybe it was around $20 usd i don’t remember.[/quote]The cardbus adapter isn’t a problem (22 EUR) :wink:

So, now let’s stop being off-topic and wait for further information about the issue of the original poster :cop: :slight_smile:

Michael


#16

I own a Compaq Presario R4125 CA laptop. The specs for my laptop is provided at this site:

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00392884&lc=en&cc=us&dlc=en&product=503488&lang=en

Another site with info regarding my laptop:

http://reviews.cnet.com/laptops/compaq-presario-r4000-15/4507-3121_7-31447602.html

I purchased this laptop three years ago.

Actually, I want to use my usb 2.0 port if possible for DVD burning at speed of 8X or above. This solution is better than buying a new esata express card and esata enclosure for a sata dvd writer.

All of the burning I did was done using imgburn and DVDFab for burning movies.


#17

Here is an attachment of a screen shot of my device manager which shows the configuration for my usb 2.0 port.



#18

Super Mario you have an EHCI so there should be no problem burning @ 8x


#19

I purchased a LG GH20NS10 sata dvd writer and placed it into an external SATA enclosure. I also purchased an esata express card for my laptop. With the express card inserted into my laptop, I’m able to burn at 16X using Verbatim 16X discs.

I made backup copies of my Wii games with no problems. All of these games were burned at 16X using Verbatim 16X discs.

I then tried backing up my movies. I tried to burn A Few Good Men using Verbatim 16X discs at 12X and 8X speeds. The movie burned at 8X and 12X speeds played in my laptop but it paused several times for less than 1 second when I played it in my DVD player connected to my LCD TV. How can I burn the movie with no pause? I used ImgBurn 2.4.1.0. to burn the movie. Before I burned the movie, I had to use ImgBurn to convert the VOB files to ISO images.

Here is the ImgBurn log file showing the burn process at 8X:

I 15:31:27 ImgBurn Version 2.4.1.0 started!
I 15:31:27 Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition (5.1, Build 2600 : Service Pack 2)
I 15:31:27 Total Physical Memory: 1,309,168 KB - Available: 575,536 KB
I 15:31:28 Initialising SPTI…
I 15:31:28 Searching for SCSI / ATAPI devices…
I 15:31:28 Found 2 DVD-ROMs, 1 DVD±RW and 1 DVD±RW/RAM!
I 15:32:19 Operation Started!
I 15:32:19 Source File: D:\Temp\A Few Good Men ISO\A Few Good Men.iso
I 15:32:19 Source File Sectors: 2,251,328 (MODE1/2048)
I 15:32:19 Source File Size: 4,610,719,744 bytes
I 15:32:19 Source File Volume Identifier: A Few Good Men
I 15:32:19 Source File Volume Set Identifier: 38BE796B00225A20
I 15:32:19 Source File Application Identifier: IMGBURN V2.4.1.0 - THE ULTIMATE IMAGE BURNER!
I 15:32:19 Source File Implementation Identifier: ImgBurn
I 15:32:19 Source File File System(s): ISO9660, UDF (1.02)
I 15:32:19 Destination Device: [3:0:0] HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GH20NS10 EL01 (I:) (SCSI)
I 15:32:19 Destination Media Type: DVD+R (Disc ID: MCC-004-00) (Speeds: 4x, 8x, 12x, 16x, 18x, 20x)
I 15:32:19 Destination Media Sectors: 2,295,104
I 15:32:19 Write Mode: DVD
I 15:32:19 Write Type: DAO
I 15:32:19 Write Speed: 8x
I 15:32:19 Link Size: Auto
I 15:32:19 Test Mode: No
I 15:32:19 OPC: No
I 15:32:19 BURN-Proof: Enabled
I 15:32:19 Book Type Setting: DVD-ROM
I 15:32:39 Filling Buffer… (160 MB)
I 15:32:48 Writing LeadIn…
I 15:32:52 Writing Session 1 of 1… (1 Track, LBA: 0 - 2251327)
I 15:32:52 Writing Track 1 of 1… (MODE1/2048, LBA: 0 - 2251327)
I 15:39:49 Synchronising Cache…
I 15:39:50 Closing Track…
I 15:39:51 Finalising Disc…
I 15:40:17 Exporting Graph Data…
I 15:40:17 Graph Data File: C:\Documents and Settings\John\Application Data\ImgBurn\Graph Data Files\HL-DT-ST_DVDRAM_GH20NS10_EL01_MAY-30-2008_3-32_PM_MCC-004-00_8x.ibg
I 15:40:17 Export Successfully Completed!
I 15:40:17 Operation Successfully Completed! - Duration: 00:07:57
I 15:40:17 Average Write Rate: 10,797 KB/s (7.8x) - Maximum Write Rate: 11,710 KB/s (8.5x)

Here is the ImgBurn log file showing the burn process at 12X:

I 20:35:11 ImgBurn Version 2.4.1.0 started!
I 20:35:11 Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition (5.1, Build 2600 : Service Pack 2)
I 20:35:11 Total Physical Memory: 1,309,168 KB - Available: 747,724 KB
I 20:35:11 Initialising Patin-Couffin…
I 20:35:11 Patin-Couffin - VSO Software - Version 1.37.0.0 - Internal Revision 37
I 20:35:11 Searching for SCSI / ATAPI devices…
I 20:35:21 Found 2 DVD-ROMs, 1 DVD±RW and 1 DVD-RAM/+R!
I 20:35:49 Operation Started!
I 20:35:49 Source File: D:\Temp\A Few Good Men ISO\A Few Good Men.iso
I 20:35:49 Source File Sectors: 2,251,328 (MODE1/2048)
I 20:35:49 Source File Size: 4,610,719,744 bytes
I 20:35:49 Source File Volume Identifier: A Few Good Men
I 20:35:49 Source File Volume Set Identifier: 38BE796B00225A20
I 20:35:49 Source File Application Identifier: IMGBURN V2.4.1.0 - THE ULTIMATE IMAGE BURNER!
I 20:35:49 Source File Implementation Identifier: ImgBurn
I 20:35:49 Source File File System(s): ISO9660, UDF (1.02)
I 20:35:49 Destination Device: [3:0:0] HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GH20NS10 EL01 (I:) (SCSI)
I 20:35:49 Destination Media Type: DVD+R (Disc ID: MCC-004-00) (Speeds: 4x, 8x, 12x, 16x, 18x, 20x)
I 20:35:49 Destination Media Sectors: 2,295,104
I 20:35:49 Write Mode: DVD
I 20:35:49 Write Type: DAO
I 20:35:49 Write Speed: 12x
I 20:35:49 Link Size: Auto
I 20:35:49 Test Mode: No
I 20:35:49 OPC: No
I 20:35:49 BURN-Proof: Enabled
I 20:35:49 Book Type Setting: DVD-ROM
I 20:36:09 Filling Buffer… (256 MB)
I 20:36:22 Writing LeadIn…
I 20:36:26 Writing Session 1 of 1… (1 Track, LBA: 0 - 2251327)
I 20:36:26 Writing Track 1 of 1… (MODE1/2048, LBA: 0 - 2251327)
I 20:41:33 Synchronising Cache…
I 20:41:34 Closing Track…
I 20:41:35 Finalising Disc…
I 20:42:00 Exporting Graph Data…
I 20:42:00 Graph Data File: C:\Documents and Settings\John\Application Data\ImgBurn\Graph Data Files\HL-DT-ST_DVDRAM_GH20NS10_EL01_MAY-31-2008_8-35_PM_MCC-004-00_12x.ibg
I 20:42:00 Export Successfully Completed!
I 20:42:00 Operation Successfully Completed! - Duration: 00:06:10
I 20:42:00 Average Write Rate: 14,714 KB/s (10.6x) - Maximum Write Rate: 16,666 KB/s (12.0x)


#20

Any particular reason to change from SPTI to Patin-Couffin? Just curious is all.

Where are your MCC004’s made? In Taiwan or In India.

What happens when you play the file from your hard drive with say VLC?