Examples of condensation ineveryday life

Hey sorry for the dumb question but my friend is going nuts trying to find an example of condensation in everyday life not using water. Anyone got any ideas?

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Hmm, I guess one such case could be when water appears on your windshield after you park you car outside on a particularly humid night. Condensation also can occur on cold beverages in hot temperatures.

Someone double check this. I failed most of my science classes :wink:

“not using water”

Water can’t condense, but water vapor can! :wink:

Any liquid can condense as long as it is subjected to the right Pressure/Temperature… Think of a substance that exists as a liquid at room temperature, then think of a time that that would be a gas…

Gases condense to become a star. (at least in theory). Electricity condenses into lightning (though I’m not really sure this is called condensation). Salt ocean water condenses into salt crystals in many places. I could shorten this paragraph alot (that would be condensing it). :bigsmile:

Like dhc014 said, ALMOST ALL vapours can condence (i say almost all because im sure there is 1 or 2 elements that dont conform, like the ones that exists for 10000th of a second and cant be weighed.

Thing is, water has the most resonable condense, and evaporate temps. 100 degrees C it boils and evaporates, a temp that is easy to reach in every day life around the home.

Perhaps chlorine would be the next closest, no idea.

How about common house dust, which is very small, but when builds up, can be a little solid ball or something?

Sorry, but there are no vapors besides water and air in everyday life, and you’ll never see air condense. :stuck_out_tongue:

Here’s an example you can observe of a liquid other than water condensing. Gases when compressed and stored under pressure, butane or propane for example, change to a liquid state. When you release it from its container it changes back into a gaseous state. If you release it rapidly, especially when the ambient temperature is warm, you can see it actually condensing into a vapor. If you had enough of it you could literally cause a cloud, albeit an explosive one. Carbon dioxide gas is another example. Dry ice vapor is readily observable at room temperature. A good visual example is to add dry ice to water. The resulting dry ice fog behaves very differently than water vapor. It’s heavier than air, so one can actually pour the fog from the container and see that it behaves like a liquid, although it is a gas in actuality.

Originally posted by iamrocket
Gases condense to become a star. (at least in theory). Electricity condenses into lightning (though I’m not really sure this is called condensation). Salt ocean water condenses into salt crystals in many places. I could shorten this paragraph alot (that would be condensing it). :bigsmile:

You misses one, Milk condenses into a can.:eek:

Your fridge or car air conditioning uses condensation:


Although this is about condensation under pressure really, and I suspect you may be looking for temperature-related state changes.
I have to say, some of the answers here are either very worrying, or on a different plane of irony altogether.

Water is the most abundant thing in this world, We practicaly cant think of anything about condensation without evaporation… If this was a project, Go tell your teacher that.

anielle if this was a project this student failed because this was 7 years ago when this question was ask.

You got me thinking about that question and there would not be condensation without water ,without water the only condensation would be the word (condensation) and we would not be.:eek:


If the OP had limited his question to naturally occurring condensation I agree with marloyd.
Since the limitation was “everyday life” then that depends on who’s’ everyday life.
Almost every gas is condensed for use by humans for some use & someone probably uses that gas everyday .
I guess by technical definition electricity is not condensed because it is not gas condensed to liquid.
But then neither is condensed milk I guess it is misnamed.

Apart from gases, all matter is condensed :slight_smile:

Michael

[QUOTE=marloyd;2561458]You got me thinking about that question and there would not be condensation without water ,without water the only condensation would be the word (condensation) and we would not be.:eek:[/QUOTE]

Alcohol is distilled and condensed in a condenser as are petroleum based products or anything else that is refined by distillation.

I prefer drinking the alcohol based products though. :smiley:

Mercury can be driven off from ore by heating and then condensed to form liquid mercury.

There are loads of examples that don’t involve water.

Even more bizarrely some substances don’t condense but undergo ‘sublimation’ and ‘deposition’ where they change directly from solid to gas then from gas to solid without passing through a liquid phase and this process is used to purify certain crystalline materials such as naphthalene which is used in mothballs.

[B]Wombler[/B]

[QUOTE=Wombler;2561548]
Even more bizarrely some substances don’t condense but undergo ‘sublimation’ and ‘deposition’ where they change directly from solid to gas then from gas to solid without passing through a liquid phase (…)[/QUOTE]This is not bizarre, but totally normal
–> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_transition
:smiley:

Michael

[QUOTE=Prowler;373052]Here’s an example you can observe of a liquid other than water condensing. Gases when compressed and stored under pressure, butane or propane for example, change to a liquid state. When you release it from its container it changes back into a gaseous state. If you release it rapidly, especially when the ambient temperature is warm, you can see it actually condensing into a vapor. If you had enough of it you could literally cause a cloud, albeit an explosive one. Carbon dioxide gas is another example. Dry ice vapor is readily observable at room temperature. A good visual example is to add dry ice to water. The resulting dry ice fog behaves very differently than water vapor. It’s heavier than air, so one can actually pour the fog from the container and see that it behaves like a liquid, although it is a gas in actuality.[/QUOTE]

Dry Ice Vapor (Actually CO2 /Carbon Dioxide) doesn’t form the visible cloud you see… it causes water in the air to condense, the CO2 remains invisible.

You can however sometimes see hydrocarbon vapors condense on a fuel filler nozzle while refueling your car in cold weather…

AD

[QUOTE=mciahel;2561550]This is not bizarre, but totally normal
–> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_transition
:smiley:

Michael[/QUOTE]

It’s natural but it’s a very unusual behaviour under normal atmospheric pressure.

In fact there aren’t that many substances that do that under normal conditions.

Iodine, naphthalene and dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) are the only ones that I can think of off the top of my head.

Normal ice will do it too but at a very slow rate.

There may be more, but out of the billions of chemical substances and molecular structures that can exist that’s really very very few indeed.

[B]Wombler[/B]