Every movie i go to back up seems to be dual layered?

vbimport

#1

Is it just me or every movie i go to back up seems to be dual layered???

Even my daughters movies that we have got for her, I cant even back them up. Bring on the coasters

Is there something im missing or am I just going to have to pay $5 each for dual layerd disks??


#2

The fact the original movies are Dual Layer (DL) does not mean you can’t back up to Single Layer (SL) media. In fact, DL media quality is still far behind SL media, as the DL media 1st layer might record very well, but then the layer break and 2nd layer records a lot more errors than it should. Just get a good SL media, like Taiyo Yuden OEM or Verbatim, with some saying RicohJPN being pretty good, and even some Moser Baer India (MBI/MBIP) (there are some others, but those are the better/best ones around; good places to check would be the “Blank Media” forum, the “Bargain Basement” forum for examples of burn scans that help show what is quality media and what is not). I’ll simplify it a little for you: DO NOT BUY ANYTHING RITEK, as the DVD fails within months to 1 year, and it carries NO warranty.

If you do not have the software to decrypt and compress movies to SL media, I would recommend AnyDVD and CloneDVDII from www.slysoft.com. They have very good tech support, you can get both for a ‘bundle’ deal (under $60), and both effectively have lifetime free updates. Also, both are actively developed to keep up with new encryptions.


#3

Almost every movie is dual layer now. To back them up, use a a
compression prog like DVD2One (has never failed me) or Shrink or
umpteen others, many of which can be downloaded free from this
very site.


#4

I use Dvd Rebuilder to compress most of the larger DL movies. Its slow but for quality i think its worth it.


#5

Hello I have just downloaded the CloneCD software and I am pretty new to using the computer. Also I am use to getting writen directions. So is there a place or can someone tell me the step by step on how to get started and use the CloneCD software, This may sound easy to some but I can not seem to get going, Thank you for any help…


#6

I actually get more SL movies than DL, but then I get older movies and a lot of foreign stuff.


#7

Do a search and you’ll find all and more than you need to know. I think we have a Clone forum here in this site also. I use Shrink and Decrypter and they’re great plus free.


#8

It depends on which discs you are trying to back up (obviously), and you may just have a preference for the types of releases that are being released on dual layer original discs.

These tend to be the major releases, the newer, mainstream “hollywood blockbuster” type of fare. This is because the industry knows that extras sell, and that a certain segment of the market is also prone to buy based on the picture quality (and if less compression is used on the transfer, the film might take up more than a single layer). There is a somewhat sizable market for the “Superbit DVDs,” as we have seen. And, there is a much larger group that is fascinated with extras, so much that they will buy a release from Best Buy or Circuit City merely because they are offering an additional “bonus” disc with even more and more extras, regardless of the obvious fact that these are the extras that were so ho-hum that they did not even make the cut…

Independent films tend to end up as a single layer DVD release more often. Foreign films tend to end up as a single layer DVD release more often. Older films, and even classic films tend to be end up as a single layer DVD release more often. The family that purchases a lot of these might well have posted here that they almost never see a “dual layer” store bought disc.

Also, those films which were released early on, and have not had any re-release are going to be on a single layer disc, since early on this was the only thing coming out of the factories.

Now, you may be frustrated by this… but here are a few thoughts that may (or may not) be important:

-you can always try to eliminate any stuff which you deem NOT important on a backup, which sometimes can make the entire thing fit with no compression. When this works, this means no compression, the backup looks as great as the original.

-you can always try to eliminate any stuff which you deem NOT important on a backup, which will always mean you are left using less compression. In many cases, depending on your needs you end up with very, very little compression. A lot of people do not the DTS sound, if they do not have the DTS-capable system. A lot of people do not need the foreign language soundtracks, or at least those in four languages they do not speak. A lot of people do not need the subtitles, or at least those in seven languages they do not read. A surprising number of people realize that they can also eliminate the cast bios, and “Making of Featurette,” and the "Making of ‘The Making of’ featurette. Many people eliminate the deleted scenes. It is only a backup, right? Some people find they can live without a director’s commentary. Many more people discover they can live without the commentary by the second unit photographer, the guy in the bunny suit in scene 3, and the assistant sound editor, who also helped on some of the Foley. Those storyboards might have been the reason you bought the disc in the first place, but maybe seeing them the first four times was enough, especially since you still have them on the original disc, right? And, especially since the movie is only “Halloween 15: Jason Does Dallas.”

-you can always choose to “split” the dual layer discs to two blank DVD single layer discs. This is actually my own personal preference. The only real compromise is that we get up once and change a disc, but this can be pre-set at a comfortable chapter break, and it has become the “bathroom, replenish the snacks and refreshment, and change the disc” break. No compression, the backup looks as great as the original.

-you can do any of the above, or even mix and match from the above, while you wait and watch those dual layer blank discs begin to continue to fall in price. In 18 months, they have gone from $13.99 per disc to $13 per disc to $10 per disc to $8 per disc, and then $7 per disc. Then, it was $6, and as you have noted, $5 per disc (especially in retail stores.) The going rate for the very best ones – (Verbatim DVD+R) – on-line, right now is between $4 and $4.60 per disc. There were two recent sales where they sold for $3.99 per disc. They will hit $1.00 per disc, and I recall not too long ago when single layer blanks were much higher than that.

Of course, by the time that day comes, propbably this winter, or early spring, we will suddenly begin the tiniest speck of interest in a new, seductive enticement… Blue-Ray… HD-DVD… and, of course, the inevitable Blue-Ray writers. And burners. Not to mention, the inevitable HD-DVD writers. And burners.

All of this, while we eagerly anticipate the Special Edition re-release of the classic 1960s sit-com “My Mother the Car” on DVD, along with that special bonus disc featuring the documentary “Body Shop: How The NBC Censors Made Me Tone Down Those Huge Headlamps for PrimeTime Television.”

Keep it all in perspective,

-Bruce


#9

I personally use DVDFab, it spans a DL disc over 2 SL discs…
May be a hassle to change discs during the movie, but at least I do not have to settle with less (compressed) quality.


#10

I personally use CloneDVD to strip out anything I don’t want to when backing-up a DVD-Video disc. Usually, for me, this means that I remove everything except the main movie, main audio track and the Dutch subtitles. This usually means that either none or a little compression is needed to fit the DVD9 disc on a DVDR5 (single layer). When compression does not fall below 80% you won’t notice any difference. If you go below that you might see some pixelation if you use an encoder like CloneDVD or DVD Shrink. If you use an application like DVD Rebuilder then you will get better results when using a high(er) compression level but encoding takes a lot of time.

I guess it all depends on personal preference. I personally don’t care much about extra’s, DTS sound, etc. and am only interested in the main movie.


#11

-you can do any of the above, or even mix and match from the above, while you wait and watch those dual layer blank discs begin to continue to fall in price. In 18 months, they have gone from $13.99 per disc to $13 per disc to $10 per disc to $8 per disc, and then $7 per disc. Then, it was $6, and as you have noted, $5 per disc (especially in retail stores.) The going rate for the very best ones – (Verbatim DVD+R) – on-line, right now is between $4 and $4.60 per disc. There were two recent sales where they sold for $3.99 per disc. They will hit $1.00 per disc, and I recall not too long ago when single layer blanks were much higher than that.

Retailers are ripping people off as far as DL disc prices. i work at BB and a 15 pk of Memorex DL discs just dropped to $59 (i know some of you have memorex discs, so do i but…) and with my discount i only paid $31. So you know they’re going to sell at a profit still, so it makes me wonder what the real cost of these dvds are. :a


#12

CloneDVD2 or DVDShrink would do a great job on shrinking ur dvds but if u want to keep the quality go with dvdfab as Da_Taxman mentioned splittting it into 2 dvds


#13

sikoone:

Just like most new forms of technology, the costs are very high early on as the developers and manufacturers try to recoup the initial costs of R & R (research and development), and the initial design costs, and the re-tooling which might be required in some cases for factories. They rely on those “early adopters” to try to recoup most of this. So, the answer to this question – “so it makes me wonder what the real cost of these dvds are” – would depend completely on whether you had to include those costs, or not. The actual manufacturing costs, even today, are probably not dramatically different from that of single layer discs. However, somebody must pay the salaries of those who did the initial research, and the checked and double-checked the specs, and tested, and re-tested, and designed…

This, of course, is why the first HD-DVD players and the first Blue Ray players will be around $1000. It is why the earliest VCRs were $2000. It is why the earlist DVD players – that I can recall – were around $1400. It is why the first DVD recorders were around $1800. This why that same Pioneer 60 inch plasma set sold for $15000.00 eighteen months ago, and yet you can now buy it right now, and with improved specs, for only $6200.00. Yes, the actual costs of manufacturing have come down, but only very slightly. All of the guys who did the design, the research, the original “spec”-ing, the testing, the re-design, the problem-solving, have to be paid for. Once that happens, the manufacturers can relax, and the competition drives the actual street prices steadily down.

-Bruce


#14

Is this DVD Fab program user friendly as I am a Noob and have been using DVD Shrink and as well Clone DVD along with Any DVD.

What I guess I am asking is if when the split of a movie is done onto a second DVD disc is there a default setting so that it will be done at a reasonalbe point in a movie or is there a possibility that you may end up with 10 minutes as an example on the second disc and the major portion of the movie on the first disc.
I burn as a rule the movie and not all the extras.

I look forward to a reply, thankyou,.
This is the first time in my cruising of Forums and seen a mention of DVD Fab, I also should imagine that it is compatible with Any DVD???
once again thankyou


#15

Don’t know much about the compatibility with other programs, but DVDFab allows me to use a wizard or manual setup of backing up a dual layer disc onto 2 single layer discs. It is a few click program and very easy to use (wouldn’t use it otherwise, as non-technical person :wink: ).


#16

Agreed. Put it upto 3 pass VBR with CCE 2.50 and even at a birtrate of 2500kbps it will look great. Thats around 60% quality reduction.

Ben :slight_smile: