European Cybercrime Centre: don’t use free anti malware products

We’ve just posted the following news: European Cybercrime Centre: don’t use free anti malware products[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/08/Malware-Thumbnail.png[/newsimage]
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Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/european-cybercrime-centre-dont-use-free-anti-malware-products-71621

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

I don’t see any real reason given in the article why the free versions of commercial products don’t provide adequate protection.

In my experience, the paid for versions of anti-virus programs (I use a paid for version of Avast at work and the free version at home) don’t provide any greater protection than the free versions; the only real difference is that the commercial product generally has extended and additional features and the free version often is free only for personal use.

Certainly, in the case of Avast, the definitions are identical.

I have yet to see any commercial anti-virus guarantee no infections or total immunity from all malware.
Also they didn’t mention which particular products that were superior to all others.
I find it hard to believe that any paid for anti-virus is necessarily better than any free anti-virus.

At present, I am not aware of any desktop antivirus product (paid or free) that offers decent e-mail protection, at least not to the extent that Gmail offers.

For example, Malware distributors regularly distribute their infections as e-mail claiming to be bank statements, overdue invoices, voice messages, customer complaints and so on, which usually contain a zipped executable file attached. Now, can someone name just one desktop virus checker that can automatically quarantine e-mails that contain any executable files in its attachment? :slight_smile:

As I own a domain name, I regularly get such e-mails, usually sent to non-existant e-mail addresses of my domain (support@, info@, etc.) and I usually upload the attachments to VirusTotal which checks them against 54 products. Generally just 2 to 4 of them show the attachment as infected and these 2 to 4 vary, so there’s no virus checker that detects them all. Usually if I retry the attachment a day later, the majority show it infected.

I do know many of the e-mail server based virus protection offer such attachment filtering, but very few consumers are going to run their own e-mail server just to get that type of protection, which is also quite expensive. Even businesses moving to the cloud lose out, as there’s no way to install e-mail server protection with most hosted e-mail services, such as Office 365.

Has anyone ever heard of Matousec.com’s [url=http://www.matousec.com/projects/proactive-security-challenge-64/results.php]Proactive Security Challenge 64? They test Host Intrusion Prevention System (HIPS) methods, to see which one can prevent a computer from getting infected in the first place.

That said, Comodo Internet Security, a freeware anti-virus program for Windows, always seems to waste the competition by a landslide. When I say “competition”, I am referring to several name-brand programs like McAfee, ESET, AVG, MalwareBytes, Norton, ect.

Of course, the best way to prevent an infection is to only use freedom-respecting software, whose source codes can be studied. Otherwise, you may not be aware of the the fact that Windows itself comes with malware which cannot be disabled.

[QUOTE=Seán;2728088]At present, I am not aware of any desktop antivirus product (paid or free) that offers decent e-mail protection, at least not to the extent that Gmail offers.

For example, Malware distributors regularly distribute their infections as e-mail claiming to be bank statements, overdue invoices, voice messages, customer complaints and so on, which usually contain a zipped executable file attached. Now, can someone name just one desktop virus checker that can automatically quarantine e-mails that contain any executable files in its attachment? :slight_smile:

Generally just 2 to 4 of them show the attachment as infected and these 2 to 4 vary, so there’s no virus checker that detects them all. Usually if I retry the attachment a day later, the majority show it infected. [/QUOTE]

1st of all,I can’t recommend an antivirus that meets your requirements…:disagree:
But,IMHO,you rely too much solely on an antivirus program to serve your needs…
There are programs like BlueRidge’s AppGuard or NoVirusThanks Exe which can cover your needs without the fear for being compromized…

[QUOTE=roadworker;2728207]1st of all,I can’t recommend an antivirus that meets your requirements…:disagree:
But,IMHO,you rely too much solely on an antivirus program to serve your needs…[/QUOTE]

I’m not talking about my requirements here, but what virus checkers should be capable of doing for everyone.

It doesn’t really make sense that many antivirus products offer solutions like cleaning the registry, performing PC start up optimisation, etc., yet require third party products such as what you mentioned just to protect themselves from e-mail attachment infections.

[QUOTE=Seán;2728217]It doesn’t really make sense that many antivirus products offer solutions like cleaning the registry, performing PC start up optimisation, etc., yet require third party products such as what you mentioned just to protect themselves from e-mail attachment infections.[/QUOTE]

Agreed!:iagree:
Makes people wonder if that isn’t on purpose…:bigsmile:

The only negative common in free versions, is that often the update frequency is limited, so the free will not be as up to date as the paid.

:clap:
IMHO what I see as the difference between Paid and Free versions is Paid versions come with “Support” - (if you can call it that).
If you’re infected there are plenty of trial versions to help you out. If the software you use doesn’t do the trick, just keep trying others until you get what you need.
I believe most malware is created by the developers of ANTI-whatever programs to justify their existence (and the price).:rolleyes:
A good firewall - one that reports unknown outgoing Internet connections and simple protection practices will prevent most infections.

  1. Don’t open email from unknown senders.
  2. Don’t click hyperlinks unless you are familiar with the website you are on.
  3. Block pop-ups.
  4. Be careful using websites containing questionable material.

[QUOTE=philamber;2728078]I don’t see any real reason given in the article why the free versions of commercial products don’t provide adequate protection.

In my experience, the paid for versions of anti-virus programs (I use a paid for version of Avast at work and the free version at home) don’t provide any greater protection than the free versions; the only real difference is that the commercial product generally has extended and additional features and the free version often is free only for personal use.

Certainly, in the case of Avast, the definitions are identical.[/QUOTE]