EFF: Sony PS3 hack lawsuit sends a "dangerous message"

vbimport

#1

EFF: Sony PS3 hack lawsuit sends a “dangerous message”.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2011/01/Q21fXL.jpg[/newsimage]The lawsuit brought by Sony against hacking group Fail0verflow and George “GeoHot” Hotz is the most recent in a series of legal actions by electronics manufacturers in an attempt to control the way in which an end user can utilize a product. In a new commentary, the Electronic Freedom Foundation (EFF) explains why this latest lawsuit filed by Sony sends a “dangerous message” and could have some serious repercussions for consumers in the future if the company gets what they’re asking for.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/eff-sony-ps3-hack-lawsuit-sends-a-dangerous-message-39043/](http://www.myce.com/news/eff-sony-ps3-hack-lawsuit-sends-a-dangerous-message-39043/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

no one should have the right to tell a person what they can and cannot do with anything that the person has bought. it is theirs. they paid good and often hard earned money for the item. the only thing the manufacturer should be allowed to do, is to invalidate the warranty on that item if it is altered in a way that it should not be. using it in a way it is intended is not altering it.
Sony need to think back as to why this all happened. they used the Linux feature on the PS3 as a way of encouraging sales of it. then they took that feature away which really pissed a lot of people off. if Sony continue down the route of suing Hotz and the others, for doing nothing illegal, they are going to piss people off even more, damaging their own image and sales.


#3

I agree. I think microsoft handled their situation much better then Sony is now handling theres. The 360’s dvd drive was hacked within a year of the 360 getting released.

Microsoft does there best to patch the security hole, hackers find new ways around it. Microsoft bands people from the “Live” experience.

The only MS did that really pissed people off was during one banwave, they changed settings (also referred to as corruption) so you can’t move your gamertag or saves to other consoles. That didn’t go down well, so they backpedaled.

Look at all the negative stigma against the RIAA from a decade of lawsuits, its had a negative impact on that industry. I’m not sure what Sony itends to gain from all this or that crazy plan to start using serial numbers.


#4

Publicity is going to be the defendants best weapon. Having consumers rallying against Sony’s Draconian style of consumer oppression should be Sony’s worst nightmare.


#5

[QUOTE=kevpc;2570935]no one should have the right to tell a person what they can and cannot do with anything that the person has bought. it is theirs. they paid good and often hard earned money for the item. the only thing the manufacturer should be allowed to do, is to invalidate the warranty on that item if it is altered in a way that it should not be. using it in a way it is intended is not altering it.
Sony need to think back as to why this all happened. they used the Linux feature on the PS3 as a way of encouraging sales of it. then they took that feature away which really pissed a lot of people off. if Sony continue down the route of suing Hotz and the others, for doing nothing illegal, they are going to piss people off even more, damaging their own image and sales.[/QUOTE]

Before I get flamed for this let me give you a counter point…If I go and legally purchase a firearm, load it, and then leave it unattended in public, am I responsible for anything that may be done with that firearm? The answer is yes. Is hacking a PS3 the same as a firearm not really, BUT if someone circumvents the factory security settings for the system, it does give them the ability to effect other users. So, lets look at the ramifications when someone hacks the system for reasons other than having a non default OS. Modern Warfare 2 has become an unplayable joke, and users that may or may not have honestly progressed in the game are losing their stats. Piracy has become a problem, and although many feel that piracy is “no big deal” I honestly believe that they would feel differently if something they made or designed was given to others without any compensation. The whole point of my rant is…Yes if you purchase something, it becomes your property, however as the owner the you have the responsibility to ensure your property doesn’t cause problems for other people.


#6

My take as a gearhead is from the car hobbyist standpoint. Look in any car or truck magazine and you will find dozens of products allowing you to reversed engineer your car. That is perfectly legal (depending on your state vehicle code). What’s the difference?


#7

[QUOTE=fyrdawg589;2577018]My take as a gearhead is from the car hobbyist standpoint. Look in any car or truck magazine and you will find dozens of products allowing you to reversed engineer your car. That is perfectly legal (depending on your state vehicle code). What’s the difference?[/QUOTE]

Step 1, the source

Say your car comes with an advanced electronic system (computer chip) that handles the fuel/air ratio and other stuff like ABS, headlights, tire pressure, etcetera.

A lot of programmers worked hard programming that chip and they consider themselves as the author of their programming. The code is theirs. They want to sell it to car companies to make a living. They love cars. They love making it safe. They love they can make money with their passion.

Step 2, making money!

They sell this chip, with the code, to some major car manufacturers, which happily pay the license fee and install that thing in their cars. The manufacturer is happy. The chip checks everything and the car works perfectly. This investment will benefit the company.

Step 3, it’s mine!

Now you suddenly decide to build or modify a car yourself. You are not in the mood to buy a licensed chip and can’t really get the hang on how to handle the fuel/air ratio, ABS, headlights, tire pressure, etc. But you know of this chip from another car. You copy the content of that chip to another chip using a programmer and install it in your car. Much cheaper.

Step 4a, sale!

Now you sell that car to your customer.

Step 4b, happy hobby!

Now you give away the method of making your own chip to your friends. They all can make cheap chips now.


You may think there is nothing wrong with this. Perhaps there isn’t anything wrong with it.

Now re-read the story and pretend you’re the programmer.

Now re-read the story and pretend you’re the car manufacturer

Feeling screwed yet?


#8

Yep, one product is called FlashPaq and is available from Superchips.com. Ask any gearhead and they will tell you they know what it is, love it, hate it, used it, etc. It backs up the old tune program before uploading the new one. They can move shift points, adjust air fuel mixtures, and spark ignition points to custom tune for any application such as towing, racing, fuel economy. Some systems even have dash switches to change modes on the fly. You can also use them to re-calibrate speedos to compensate for different tire sizes. And yes the manufacturer will tell you, the Flashpaq, pocket tuner, etc. is available and does work, but it will void your vehicle’s warranty. As both a gearhead and a computer geek, there is no difference as I see it. The only difference between auto makers and computer makers is auto makers aren’t offended when you modify their stuff. Check any aftermarket auto catalog, JC Whitney, LMC Truck, Jeg’s High performance, etc. just to see how many mods are out there. Plus there is a similar aftermarket for computers, how many of us have computers that have the same video card, sound card motherboard, processor, etc. that our boxes came with? Chances are few if any.


#9

[QUOTE=fyrdawg589;2577346]

The only difference between auto makers and computer makers is auto makers aren’t offended when you modify their stuff.[/QUOTE]
Because they make lots of money with the car itself, not programs (on a chip).

Software (game) companies make a lot of money with programs.


#10

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2577502]Because they make lots of money with the car itself, not programs (on a chip).

Software (game) companies make a lot of money with programs.[/QUOTE]

True, they do make money if it’s an engine from someone like MOPAR, GM performance or Ford racing, however if it’s an off brand for the engine such as Edlebrock, Merlin, or DART, or for the aforementioned chip or engine computer from someone like Painless or MSD, the big three do not make money off of those at all.

In that same vein, Sony may be shooting themselves in the foot, I remember decades ago when the IBM PC decided to unbundle the OS and other software from the desktop computer. Apple decided not to take that route. While Apple is still in business and making money, take a look at the market share of PC vs. Apple MAC.