EA hit with two more lawsuits over use of SecuROM

vbimport

#1

Spore has seen its share of disgruntled customers over the game’s use of some very intrusive DRM, but now more gamers have started to seek a legal remedy to their problems with SecuROM. At the end of September a class-action lawsuit was filed claiming that SecuROM did everything but set the users’ houses on fire, and now two more class-action lawsuits have been filed against EA.

Link: http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20081110-ea-hit-with-two-more-lawsuits-over-use-of-securom.html

:cool::cool:


#2

Spore … the game evolves … but the distributors don’t :stuck_out_tongue:
I was considering buying this game … but not now.

I guess I’ll just have to look for the DRM free version :stuck_out_tongue:


#3

This type of thing has to stop I just wish I could be on the Jury there would not be enough money in the company bank account to pay off what I would give the people bring the suit.


#4

Granted I see why there are pirate or hackers out there breaking their copy protection scheme has a legit reason for this instance. EA hasn’t learned anything have they from the Sony Rootkit debacle have they and think oh it’s their problem and not mine. Endusers buy their program for the enjoyment and having to deal with copy protection and securom defeats the enjoyment purpose of buying and playing the game. Atari is also in the same boat as well with NWN 2 securom. I have the game but man just hate having to have the disc in the drive constantly. When, I want to do something else I have to take it out. Why does the buyer who bought the game have to deal with all those securom when they own the game. It’s just like DRM all over again, the industry hasn’t learned at all that doing such measures will make end users choose other means illegal or legal to get better use of software product they buy or purchase. But that is my opinion.


#5

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2155218]It’s just like DRM all over again, the industry hasn’t learned at all that doing such measures will make end users choose other means illegal or legal to get better use of software product they buy or purchase. But that is my opinion.[/QUOTE]
If you have to f#$k around to use a game you’ve bought (or anything for that matter) the way you want … why buy it at all?

Buying their products means you are supporting a company dealing in a way that you disagree with.

And that’s the way most young people think. Add in overtones of down with the big guys … they’re got too much money … and all this DRM & copy protections is just gonna end in tears … for the producers.


#6

Ubisoft is another company that is treading down this slippery slope, an example would be Far Cry 2

Installs DRM on your computer.

You have 5 activations on 3 separate PCs.

  • Uninstalling the game “refunds” an activation. This process is called “revoke”, so as long as you complete proper uninstall you will be able to install the game an unlimited number of times on 3 systems.

  • You can upgrade your computer as many time as you want (using our revoke system)

  • Ubisoft is committed to the support of our games, and additional activations can be provided.

  • Ubisoft is committed to the long term support of our games: you’ll always be able to play Far Cry 2.

Remember when you could just buy games and play them whenever you wanted without publisher consent?

:cool::cool:


#7

[QUOTE=platinumsword;2155393]Remember when you could just buy games and play them whenever you wanted without publisher consent?[/QUOTE]

Mininova/Demonoid/<insert Warez Torrent Sites> are the new virtual malls :slight_smile: