DVD Surface Rotting (for a better word)

vbimport

#1

Hi,

Can someone explain why the surface of my DVDs are disintergrating

The above are just two discs taken at random.

The discs have full cover adhesive labels, and have been stored vertically in CD paper envelopes in very low light since being burnt.


#2

[QUOTE=in2it;2598299]Can someone explain why the surface of my DVDs are disintergrating

[…]

The discs have full cover adhesive labels[/QUOTE] The adhesive labels are the likely culprit, see this thread:


#3

Yeah you should never use adhesive labels.

Use a CD/DVD pen to write the names on the discs or if you prefer a fancier label then use printable media with a suitable printer.

Degradation of the dye occurs with all discs and for best results you should use discs with proven longevity such as Taiyo Yuden or Verbatim Azo.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#4

Thank you. Your replies are what I feared would be the case.


#5

Accepting that the label is the culprit for the damage:

At 5750 feet above sea level (Johannesburg) the atmosphere is too dry for the paper for the paper to shrink, and hence warping the disc. Anyway, there is no visual evidence of such damage.

The pattern of damage rather suggests that the polycarbonate disc, to which the label has been attached, is porous, and, over time, an organic part of the adhesive has migrated down to the dye.


#6

I must be lucky all of my DVDs(Taiyo Yuden & Verbatim) that I burned 6-7 years ago all have the adhesive type labels and they still play great, I never use paper envelopes or plastic sleeves.


#7

[QUOTE=in2it;2598373]The pattern of damage rather suggests that the polycarbonate disc, to which the label has been attached, is porous, and, over time, an organic part of the adhesive has migrated down to the dye.[/QUOTE]

That is exactly correct.

Discs are also vulnerable to hydrogen sulphide which is a naturally occurring air pollutant and a combination of oxygen and moisture which migrate through the polycarbonate.

These are the primary causes of ‘DVD rot’ which is damage/degradation of the metallic reflective layer.

BTW labelling discs can also have an adverse effect on your hardware as it unbalances the discs and puts greater strain on the drive components.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#8

Perhaps the answer is to use re-writable discs, recording on a metal alloy instead of problematic dyes.


#9

[QUOTE=StormJumper;2598375]I must be lucky all of my DVDs(Taiyo Yuden & Verbatim) that I burned 6-7 years ago all have the adhesive type labels and they still play great, I never use paper envelopes or plastic sleeves.[/QUOTE]

Yeah sometimes it’s amazing what you can get away with. :slight_smile:

Labels don’t always cause problems and if they did then there wouldn’t be a market for DVD labels.

If you understand the risks and you’re prepared to take the chance then that’s fair enough. :iagree:

From a best practice point of view though they’re not recommended.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#10

[QUOTE=in2it;2598382]Perhaps the answer is to use re-writable discs, recording on a metal alloy instead of problematic dyes.[/QUOTE]

Re-writeable discs use a phase changing metal film which isn’t as stable as the dye types used on write once media.

For this reason they’re not recommended for archival purposes.

[B]Wombler[/B]