DVD-Ranger releases CinDe, a free tool to detect whether a movie is Cinavia protected

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: DVD-Ranger releases CinDe, a free tool to detect whether a movie is Cinavia protected[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/09/myce-cinex-logo-95x75.png[/newsimage]

DVD-Ranger today released an utility that can be used to detect whether a movie is protected by the audio watermark based copy protection Cinavia. The utility is called CinDe and is free and available for everyone to download.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/dvd-ranger-releases-cinde-a-free-tool-to-detect-whether-a-movie-is-cinavia-protected-78064/](http://www.myce.com/news/dvd-ranger-releases-cinde-a-free-tool-to-detect-whether-a-movie-is-cinavia-protected-78064/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Dont all Cinavia protected movies have a little logo on the back of the video container? Have they stopped letting people know that the disc is Cinavia protected.?


#3

[QUOTE=alan1476;2764765]Dont all Cinavia protected movies have a little logo on the back of the video container? Have they stopped letting people know that the disc is Cinavia protected.?[/QUOTE]

Not all do, alan1476. Furthermore, DVD-Ranger hasn’t shied away from making their software work with torrents in which case people might not even have a box to refer to.

In theory, this could be a useful too for some people however he fact that it is a command-line application is a negtive, IMO.


#4

I don’t have any Cinavia compliant hardware or software myself. It’ll be nice to finally be able to detect it. Could be fun to play around in an audio editor to see what kind of distortion it takes to hide the watermark.

If I ever encounter such a file, that is. I haven’t bought into Blu-Ray because of AACS (which is technically still uncracked) and the general evil of big media.

The command line nature isn’t that much of a drawback.

Just create a text file containing the following:

@echo off
"C:\Program Files (x86)\CinDe\CinDe.exe" %1 -t 0
pause

Save it to the Desktop as “CinDe”. Rename it from CinDe.txt to CinDe.cmd (Read this if you can’t see the .txt part.)

Whenever you want to test a file, just drag it onto that file.

This assumes you’ve copied the CinDe folder from the zip file into C:\Program Files (x86). Edit that line to match wherever you’ve put it.

EDIT: It appears the front page version of this post has eaten all of my backslashes. Go to the forum version to see this correctly.


#5

NO only Sony

[QUOTE=alan1476;2764765]Dont all Cinavia protected movies have a little logo on the back of the video container? Have they stopped letting people know that the disc is Cinavia protected.?[/QUOTE]


#6

[QUOTE=DrinkLyeAndDie;2764773]Not all do, alan1476. Furthermore, DVD-Ranger hasn’t shied away from making their software work with torrents in which case people might not even have a box to refer to.

In theory, this could be a useful too for some people however he fact that it is a command-line application is a negative, IMO.[/QUOTE] I know it has to be easier than this, I think and its a big think LOL, I understand this but not quite sure.:disagree:


#7

yea

just use the original CMD , Win 10 makes it so easy

CinDE geeez