DVD-RAM questions

I’m thinking of getting a DVD-RAM drive, but had a few questions first.

Does anybody have any experience with the LG Electronics GSA-4167B? I have seen a pretty good review for it, and it’s only about 50 bucks.

Would anybody recommend a different drive over this one that supports DVD-RAM?

Is there any reason you couldn’t put an internal DVD-RAM drive in an external enclosure and make it a USB drive?

Would transfer speeds suffer very much by going USB instead of internal IDE?

If I wanted to transfer data to another system, will it be recognized as soon as it’s plugged in, or do you need special software/drivers?

Thanks!

-Eric G.
www.cybergooch.com

not used my 4167 for dvd-ram yet, but it burns dvdr nice and its quick, good with dual layer too :slight_smile:

i`am sure someone will post about the dvd-ram soon.

& welcome to cdfreaks

nice web-site m8 love the intro on the main page :clap:

Yeah, very nice art on this site!

LG was the first manufacturer releasing Multi-DVD-Burners. Panasonic & Hitachi only supported DVD-RAM before. From my point of view, the 4167 is a good choice.

If you ever want to make it external, make sure you get an enclosure with USB2 (or/and Firewire) connection, not usb1.1. LG even offers the external version of this drive, ready to use.

One thing to note, winxp has native dvd-ram support and should see the external drive fine. Older operating systems like 98se and winME will probably recognize the drive fine as an external burner dvd-/+r, but will need a driver for dvd-ram support.

Excellent site…:slight_smile:

Thanks guys.

What’s the deal with different DVD-RAM disc formats?

I’ve seen single sided, double sided, in a case or bare disc, 4.7, 9.4 gig, how do you know which drives can use which discs?

tia

-Eric G.
www.cybergooch.com

I would use single-sided ones, and with no cartridge. The cartrigded ones are mainly for standalone recorders.
I use 3x and 5x rated here, no problems so far.

So, what is the benefit of using -RAM actually? Mainly for easy backup purposes I presume?

i hate sounding like a noob, cause i’m really not, but i am new to the world of dvd-ram. i just got an lg-4167b, one of the reasons being because it could handle dvd-ram, and i like the idea of using it for backups.

my noob-like question is this: how the hell do i use dvd-ram??? from an earlier post…

…it sounds like if i’m using xp (which i am), i can just open an explorer window, and treat it like a hard drive or flash drive. is this the case? or do i have to use burning software? if the latter is true, do i burn a udf disc, or just a normal data disc or what?

again, please excuse my utter ignorance in this area - my efforts on google have been unfruitful, and this site seems to be the best place for resources of this type. be kind! :bow:

I found this:

No DVD burning software required – discs can be used and accessed like a removable hard disk. Windows XP supports DVD-RAM directly; earlier versions need device drivers or InCD.

actually, forget my previous post - a little more strenuous searching on this very site uncovered this:

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?p=643752#post643752

the last post on page three has a link to a page that basically answers my questions as if it had been written just to answer my question! it also provides download links for drivers too. i promise i shall never be so frivolous with a post again. :o

edit: good link, schweino. missed that one myself. that’s why forums are such useful resources - many minds applied to the same problem!

Windows XP will use your drive without the need of writing software if you use FAT32 formatted discs.
For UDF formatted discs you will need a RAM-Driver (Panasonic’s will allow UDF 1.5 and 2.0) and will allow the same under 98SE or 2k. Be careful if you have other packet writing software, as they may conflict with the RAM-driver.
External enclosures, will not limit you RAM present speeds, as the maximum is 5x and both USB 2,0 and firewire allow much higher.
If you record video streams (like DV files) go for firewire instead, from editing software to file.