Dvd-ram question

vbimport

#1

I record a lot of old movies on TCM and right now I set the timer and when it’s finished I edit out the promos and anything at the end if the time ran over. Next
I copy it to the hard drive and burn it with Recode. So using this method I waste a disk. Can I record them to DVD-Ram and transfer them to the hard drive without finalising them.
thanks, foghat


#2

[QUOTE=foghat;2552232]I record a lot of old movies on TCM and right now I set the timer and when it’s finished I edit out the promos and anything at the end if the time ran over. Next
I copy it to the hard drive and burn it with Recode. So using this method I waste a disk. Can I record them to DVD-Ram and transfer them to the hard drive without finalising them.
thanks, foghat[/QUOTE]

I don’t exactly know what you mean TCM what is that? I probably hear or seen it before but could you tell us what is exactly? Also what software are you using to edit and recode the movie as well? Not knowing what software your using makes it hard for others to know exactly what to look for that is the problem or tell you what else to do.


#3

Turner Classic Movies (TCM)…I’m guessing that’s what the OP is referring to…
According to the wiki, finalizing is not needed to transfer from DVD-RAM disc(s), since they can be accessed like a HDD…I’ve never actually used DVD-Ram discs, so someone else that has will surely chime in…
What exactly is the burning problem?..Wasting disc in which way?..


#4

[QUOTE=t0nee1;2552301]Turner Classic Movies (TCM)…I’m guessing that’s what the OP is referring to…
According to the wiki, finalizing is not needed to transfer from DVD-RAM disc(s), since they can be accessed like a HDD…I’ve never actually used DVD-Ram discs, so someone else that has will surely chime in…
What exactly is the burning problem?..Wasting disc in which way?..

You are correct I’m recording movies on Turner Classic Movies. As for wasting a disc, I record it to a dvd-r and if the movie is less than two hours long
I record the full two hours since the movie never starts at the listed time. After it’s through recording I finalise it, copy to my hard drive, edit the start finish and save it. I use a new disc to burn th one on my hard drive. Then i throw away the original since it has unneeded video on it.
foghat


#5

Hi,

for that purpose, I’d rather use DVD+RW (rewritable), or - perhaps even better - a virtual DVD writer. This is a piece of software emulating a DVD writer that stores the data into ISO disc images. Much better than a pile of thrown-away DVD discs.
I had been successfully using “Phantom Drive” for a task that required a DVD writer. :slight_smile:

Then i throw away the original since it has unneeded video on it.
Perhaps not a good idea - factory pressed discs [I]usually [/I]last longer than the stuff on DVD-R/+R.

Michael


#6

I regularly record from Turner Classic Movies, a great source for early talkie movies through movies of the film noir era. This month TCM (USA) is showing 320 titles made from the silent era through 1960 and 97 titles made after 1960. Very few post-1960 titles are of interest to me.

With my Panasonic DMR-ES and DMR-EZ series recorders I record direct to DVD-R discs. Generally I use the LP recording mode (D1–500 lines–at four hours per disc) or Flexible Recording but I try to limit the FR content to no more than 4:20 per disc to stay as close to D1 resolution as possible.

With my Panasonic DMR-EH50 HDD/DVD recorder I record directly to hard drive, edit/divide recordings and high speed dub the hard drive recordings to DVD-R discs. Generally I use the LP recording mode (D1 resolution up to about 4:11 per disc). Since high-speed dubbing does not require re-encoding there is no loss in picture quality when using high-speed dubbing.

With my Philips and Magnavox HDD/DVD recorders I record directly to hard drive, and since TCM shows movies "uncut and commercial free” my editing usually consists of no more than a front and end cut edit or title dividing if I wish to preserve interstitials as separate titles. Then I do a high-speed dub of the hard drive recordings to DVD-R discs. With Philips and Magnavox recorders I generally use one of three recording modes, SP (D1 up to 2:07 per DVD), SPP (half-D1 up to 2:46 hours per DVD) or LP (half-D1 up to 3:20 per DVD) when using high-speed dubbing. Since high-speed dubbing does not require re-encoding there is no loss in picture quality when using high-speed dubbing.

For archival use (beginning in 2008) I standardized upon Taiyo Yuden 8x Premium Line DVD-R discs with all my Panasonic, Philips and Magnavox recorders. (8x media is less stressful than 16x media for use in stand-alone recorders where all of my Panasonic, Philips and Magnavox recorders have proprietary DVD Drives.) For duplication or computer work I use 16x Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim AZO series DVD-R media. It’s easy and inexpensive to replace generic computer-type DVD burners when they suffer laser assembly or other functional failures.


#7

I think it depends first where you live and second HOW you get that channel…fibre, cable, air, satellite, streaming…
I watch TCM since the analogue days some 10+ years ago, I love to see classic movies without ads breaking them apart and also watching them for my personal education - learning kinda proper english. :wink: