DVD-RAM catching on in US and especially Japan

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article DVD-RAM catching on in US and especially Japan.

 Here's an article indicating DVD-RAM is gaining  favor among recordable formats in the US and especially in Japan. According to  the author at the Presentation Master website,...
Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10477-DVD-RAM-catching-on-in-US-and-especially-Japan.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10477-DVD-RAM-catching-on-in-US-and-especially-Japan.html)

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#2

I like and use DVD-RAM. Currently I am using an Iomega drive that supports it but only at 2.4X. DVD-RAM to me is like having an optical floppy if you will and comes in handy with large projects over Gigabyte in size. I archive most documents in folders using DVD -/+R. I plan to upgrade to a newer, faster DVD-RAM drive that supports DL -R/+R as well for better DVD-RAM performance.


#3

The problem is that the distribution doesn’t offer the format at all. We have at least LG SuperMulti drives for a long time in the market. They sell them with no blank DVD-RAm discs, and if you want to buy them you have to look hard to find them, and I haven’t seen a 5x disc yet in a shop! And when they are on the shelfs, most of them are just 2.4x… DVD-RAM has the advantages pointed out by Wesley - ease of use. But you can write them up to 100 000 times, compared to the 1000 times for a -/+R(W), and if we had the old ones with a cartridge (you can take the disc out and use it bare, anyway), the disc wouldn’t fingertips/dust and would last much longer. Anyway, studies indicate 100 years for them, compared to 30 years for DVDs. If prices were convenient, it would be the choice for keeping files in a better way. Its curious that JVC and Panasomic allways used them in home DVD recorders. So, we should think about the reasons for the format being so popular in the fareast and almos inexistent in Europe.


#4

Yeah, I like DVD-RAM. Using with my LG 4082 and JVC DVD-Recorder. RAM is more reliable than all pure optical media


#5

JVC and Panasonic use RAM drives since they allow the use of time shift with TV recording and viewing. I don’t think +/- R can do that.


#6

But why should it be more reliable (last longer) than normal -r/+r? I understand it has a higher re-write capability, but that would seem to suggest that such media is re-written more often and used as temporary storage - strange that is supposedly keeps data more secure and for longer than write-once media.


#7

The structure of the disc is different, and maybe the same aplies to the materials and the way the laser burns it.


#8

I’ve been using RAM disks both cartridge and non cartridge for a couple of years now, just like a portable hard drive. Go here http://www.ramprg.com/en/a/main.html to find out more about RAM disks and their uses.


#9

Bit late isn’t it? We have new formats on the horizon and by 2009 DVD formats will be beginning to be replaced I reckon… As for DVD-RAM, naaaa, it’s not for me…but my friend uses it to capture TV programmes and then after processing records the output back to DVD±R…


#10

DVD RAM has been the most popular DVD format in Japan since the first Panasonic DVD Recorder over five years ago. I have two Panasonic DVD Recorders and I will be using RAM for a long time.


#11

not for everything, but since ram is more reliable than other rewritable dvd media/format, i use them to backup small files. ram’s availability is better than more reliable/expensive mo drive/disks


#12

I like the format. I use it for backup. I find RAM to be more reliable than optical technology.


#13

DVD-RAM is simply the best thought-out DVD format, all-round. However, much like Blu-Ray, I’m dismayed to see them dispense with the cartridges. Also, more RAM-capable drives might be shipping soon. They also might be shipping in record numbers. Who cares? As long as the benefits aren’t explained to the consumer (and in 99.9% of cases they’re not), Joe has no clue about this format. He gets his new PC or RAM drive and has no idea about this ‘mystery’ format because the benefits aren’t explained in the manual (unless you’re Panasonic). So really, it means nothing that they will be shipping in record volumes, and speaks nothing about how many actually make use of the RAM capability. Only sales of blanks can really answer that. It will be interesting to see whether all these new RAM-capable drives ship with Matsushita’s (Panasonic’s) UDF driver to format & write to the discs in DVD’s native UDF format. Not having it bundled would be disappointing, to say the least. All that said, at least we will have more RAM-capable drives hitting the market. Which is definitely a good thing.


#14

Pioneer supports Time-shifting with 4x DVD-RW


#15

Where do you live? 5x DVD-RAM media are now sold in South Korea. They’ve been in Japan for much longer. Thanks god, 5x DVD-RAM doesn’t cost much more than 2x or 3x DVD-RAM. I haven’t bought any yet because I can always have 4x DVD+RW media at just 1/10 cost and for speeds and flexibility, I can always have more HDDs. Like what’s already said, DVD-RAM’s like big and robust floppy disk.